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jim_falconer

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Jerry Seinfeld must have been a huge fan, as he performs the entire “This Is It” song on one of his Seinfeld shows (I don’t recall which one).
 

Mark Y

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On December 20, 1960, Bugs introduced Porky Pig as host of the 11th episode of The Bugs Bunny Show.
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Porky is continually interrupted by Charlie Dog, who is still looking for a master. Chuck Jones' unit recycles some of the animation and dialogue from Awful Orphan(1949).

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Claude Cat finds that Two's A Crowd when dealing with the frisky puppy disturbing his domestic idyll.

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Charlie Dog tries to show Porky all of his finest canine attributes.


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Sylvester and Tweety are All A Bir-r-r-d a train as the cat continues his efforts to catch the bird.

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Porky finally blows his top and ejects Charlie Dog from the studio.

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Bugs introduces his encounter with Commander X-2 as the Martian tries to collect a typical Earth creature for examination in The Hasty Hare.

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Jones' unit even included a caricature of Friz Freleng as an exasperated astronomer in The Hasty Hare.

The Bugs Bunny Show
(1960-1962) was before my time, but I came of age watching The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show every Saturday, which preserved many of the same interstitial sequences prepared originally for the prime time version of the show. Bugs Bunny is my personal favorite, but I still do not want to watch 10 or 20 Bugs Bunny shorts in a row, which is how these cartoons are typically spooned out to us on home video. But take the same 10 or 20 Bugs Bunny cartoons, and mix them up with Porky, Daffy, Pepe Le Pew, Speedy Gonzalez, Foghorn Leghorn, Sylvester, Tweety, Claude Cat, Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner, and I could watch these cartoons all day long.

This is the genius inherent in the concept of The Bugs Bunny Show and its various successor shows. A mixed presentation of these great characters makes the sum of entertainment value greater than the individual parts. The eleventh episode of The Bugs Bunny Show was a great example of this. Start with Claude Cat, then Sylvester and Tweety, and cap it off with Bugs Bunny, and you leave the audience wanting more.

Who wants to see more of this great show?
I certainly do! Where are these stills from the stage scenes coming from?
 

Timothy E

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I certainly do! Where are these stills from the stage scenes coming from?
Some of the interstitial scenes for the episode from December 20, 1960, can be seen on the Facebook page of GoldenAgeCartoons.com. Unfortunately, the studio does not allow full episodes of The Bugs Bunny Show to be posted online, and attempts by others to post full episodes online have resulted in copyright infringement claims by the studio and removal of the footage from YouTube and other sites. The irony is that the studio seems to have no interest in releasing The Bugs Bunny Show in any form, but it will not allow others to share full episodes online so that all the people who want to see the show can enjoy it,

The stills being posted in this thread do not constitute copyright infringement, and are actually protected by the Fair Use doctrine of copyright law.

I hope that discussions of this show will help educate the studio about the interest in and popularity of The Bugs Bunny Show and persuade it to finally release the complete shows for all to see.
 

Timothy E

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On January 24, 1961, Bugs introduced Foghorn Leghorn as host of The Bugs Bunny Show in bridging sequences created by the Robert McKimson unit.
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Foghorn Leghorn introduced Miss Prissy and hammed it up for her and the audience.


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Each of the cartoon shorts included in this episode was created originally by Robert McKimson and his unit. In The Leghorn Blows At Midnight, the Barnyard Dog and Foghorn were up to their usual pranks against each other, with Henery Hawk being manipulated by each of them.

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Foghorn reenacted a great tragic romance, while playing all of the parts, before Porky Pig and Daffy Duck appeared as Boobs in the Woods.

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Foghorn's multitasking efforts went awry as Miss Prissy introduced Bugs in Hot Cross Bunny.

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McKimson's cartoons often featured some distant views of the action, rather than remaining focused on closeup shots throughout. I appreciate the artistry of these establishing shots, a few of which are in display in this post.
 

Timothy E

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On January 31, 1961, the 17th episode aired of The Bugs Bunny Show. Robert McKimson's unit created the bridging sequences for this episode which, like the previous week, featured Foghorn Leghorn in a prominent role. Although it was the 17th episode to air, McKimson's script indicates that this was the 16th episode in production order. Below are pages from Robert McKimson's script for this episode. It is interesting to see how the original shooting script was altered with dialogue changes by McKimson.

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The theatrical shorts included in this episode were all directed by Robert McKimson. In "Lovelorn Leghorn," Miss Prissy is looking for a husband, and Foghorn attempts to divert her by convincing her that the Barnyard Dog is a rooster.

In "Who's Kitten Who," Sylvester and Junior go mouse hunting and find a kangaroo.

In "Windblown Hare," Bugs Bunny gets swindled by the Three Little Pigs with houses of straw and sticks before Bugs has the last laugh.

The bridging sequences included one of the rare instances where Daffy Duck and Foghorn Leghorn interact together in the golden age of animation. Daffy had been a foil to Foghorn Leghorn earlier in "The High and the Flighty"(1956). It would be nice to see these shows released by Warner Archive or popping up on HBO Max.
 

Timothy E

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On February 14, 1961, the theme of The Bugs Bunny Show was the creation process of animation, with Bugs sitting at a drafting table drawing a dumbbell duck.

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After Bugs transformed a dumbbell into Daffy Duck, the bridging sequences introduced other cartoons with illustrations of an elephant and a roadrunner.

In the first cartoon short, Bugs was shanghaied by Sam, and turned the tables on his captor in Mutiny on the Bunny.

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Various "normal" people could not believe their senses when they spotted a tiny elephant in Punch Trunk.

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Finally, Bugs introduced the Roadrunner with assistance from an unseen animator, as the Coyote tried in vain to catch the bird in Fast and Furryous.


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It might have been appropriate to have Pepe Le Pew host the episode airing on Valentine's Day. The third episode, which aired originally on October 25, 1960, had the theme of love with Pepe as the host. (See post #29 in this thread.) In any event, the shorts included in this episode made for an entertaining episode.
 
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Timothy E

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On February 21, 1961, Elmer Fudd entered the studio of The Bugs Bunny Show to interrupt Bugs in his hosting duties as the story segued into The Rabbit of Seville.

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Following that presentation, Daffy found himself over his head as he tried to sell himself in a swashbuckler to the head of the studio in The Scarlet Pumpenickel.

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The episode closed out with the Coyote persisting in trying to obtain a meal in Stop! Look! and Hasten!

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Chuck Jones' unit created all of the additional animation for this episode, which included exclusively cartoon shorts directed by Jones.
 

Timothy E

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On February 28, 1961, Bugs yielded the stage to Mac and Tosh as the hosts for that week's episode of The Bugs Bunny Show. The Goofy Gophers were so agreeable that they could not agree on which of them would go first in hosting the show.

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Ultimately, Bugs introduced his own cartoon set during the hunting season in the Ozarks in Hillbilly Hare.


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Following further negotiations between Mac and Tosh, Sylvester found that his domestic life was affected by events down at the docks in Hippety Hopper.

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Finally, Daffy tried to win a big prize despite interference from Henery Hawk in You were Never Duckier.


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Timothy E

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On March 14, 1961, the Goofy Gophers returned as hosts for that week's episode of The Bugs Bunny Show. As before, Mac and Tosh cannot agree on anything, leaving Bugs to introduce all of the cartoon shorts.

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In Big House Bunny, Bugs found himself imprisoned in Sing Song Prison and turned the tables quickly on jailer Sam.

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Sylvester was left home alone with an abundance of tuna cans and a mouse to tease him with the only can opener in the house in Canned Feud.

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Bugs was so irritated with Mac and Tosh that they would never again be asked back as hosts of The Bugs Bunny Show.

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After failing to get the can opener from the mouse, Sylvester did not have any better luck in having Tweety for lunch in Home, Tweet Home.

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The Friz Freleng unit produced the bridging sequences for this episode, which consisted entirely of cartoon shorts directed originally by Friz Freleng for theatrical release.

Wouldn't it be nice if all of the episodes of The Bugs Bunny Show were available for streaming on HBO Max?
 

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Timothy E

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On March 28, 1961, Daffy Duck's efforts to host The Bugs Bunny Show were thwarted by the Tasmanian Devil. The cartoon shorts intended originally for inclusion in the episode were Henhouse Henery(1949), Curtain Razor(1949), and Devil May Hare(1954). The Robert McKimson unit created the bridging animation for this episode. Below is a copy of McKimson's original script for the episode, which shows later dialogue changes interlineated on the pages.

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The script pages also show the placement of the cartoon shorts between the interstitial sequences created specifically for the episode. The handwritten inclusion of the titles of the cartoon shorts suggests that the selection of the shorts, and their placement within the episode, were decided later in production, otherwise, the titles of the shorts would be typed rather than added later in handwriting. It is interesting to see the original dialogue in the script and compare it to the new dialogue.
 

Timothy E

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Documentation tells us that the shorts featured in episode 25 of season 1 were Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare. This documentation includes Robert McKimson's script included above in post #52 of this thread. The extant 16mm prints of The Bugs Bunny Show that I have seen so far do not support that these shorts were included in the episode, even though the script pages state that they were part of the show.

In the preceding episode of the first season, no. 24, the coming attractions portion at the end of the episode on the 16mm print that I reviewed showed previews of Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare. I have reviewed a print of the next episode, #25, but the shorts included were All Fowled Up, Dog Collared, and Bunny Hugged. (Note that both sets of cartoons include a Foghorn, Porky, and Bugs cartoon in the same order.)

I know that the 16mm prints made in the mid to late 1960s did switch out some shorts. For example, a 16mm print of season 2, episode 7 ("Ballpoint Puns") from 1966 replaced Claws For Alarm with Room and Bird. I can verify that Claws For Alarm was the original short because the closing credits remain unchanged, and Claws For Alarm was clearly indicated in the closing credits on the print. (Did the network decide that Claws For Alarm was too creepy for children in the audience on Saturday morning?)

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In the 16mm print for episode #25, the shorts indicated in the closing credits are All Fowled Up, Dog Collared, and Bunny Hugged.

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Since there is no evidence that the networks ever changed the closing credits when switching out shorts, this suggests that Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare were not featured originally in episode #25.

Is it possible that there were 2 network versions of episode #25? The episode might have aired originally with one set of cartoons, and aired in reruns with a different set. In the original script pages for episode #25, McKimson or another producer had interlineated the margins with placement of shorts entitled Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare. This strongly suggests that these particular shorts were contemplated to be the shorts included with this episode originally, even though the closing credits do not support that.

It is noteworthy that the dialogue changes made on McKimson's script pages, which are the final versions recorded with dialogue and animated with those script changes, are repetitive and duplicative of Bugs' dialogue in Devil May Hare. In the script for #25, Bugs is speaking about Taz, following the conclusion of Devil May Hare, and says words to the effect of the whole world loves a lover, but in this case I will make an exception. Bugs says the very same thing at the closing of Devil May Hare, immediately preceding this portion of the script. The producers may have realized this repetition either before or after the episode aired originally, and then switched out the shorts so that Bugs was not repeating the same dialogue that he did in the short immediately preceding it.

It would be very interesting to see which shorts the studio has in its prints of episode 25. It seems that the studio does not even know which interstitials belong to which episode, since the version of episode 23 included on the Saturday Morning Cartoons 1960s DVD set mixed in bridging animation from episode 21 with episode 23. Admittedly, this can be confusing since both of those episodes featured Mac and Tosh as the hosts. I now know definitively which animation belongs in episode 21 and 23 thanks to another complete 16mm print of episode 23. By process of elimination, this print also shows which footage belonged properly in episode 21. This print also has a variant of the closing of episode 23, different from the version presented on the Saturday Morning Cartoons 1960s DVD, which featured Mac and Tosh prominently on the closing curtain call. If there are variants of the closing credits for episode #23, then it is not a stretch to consider that there are variant versions of the show that aired or were rerun in its primetime seasons. Are there any film collectors out there in possession of other possible variant prints of this episode, or others? We may never know for sure which shorts aired originally with episode #25 unless the studio sees fit to release this series from its vault.
 

Mark Y

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I believe that many of the changes made to the episodes (as far as the cartoons featured) were due to cartoons featuring Porky Pig and others being pulled out and moved to the "Porky Pig Show" in 1964. I have VHS dubs of a few shows which have a cartoon switched out compared to the list in the Beck/Freidwald book, but the original cartoons are still listed in the closing credits.

The reconstructed episode on the SMC 1960s set was probably assembled the way it was because they happened to have color elements for those segments, but I'm just guessing. I also note that in a "Porky Pig Show" in one of the sets, there is a segment featuring Bugs Bunny with footage apparently rotoscoped from "Rhapsody Rabbit," which I think is clearly from "The Bugs Bunny Show."
 

Timothy E

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The second and final season of The Bugs Bunny Show in prime time premiered on the ABC Network at 7:30 p.m. on October 10, 1961. Today marks the 60th anniversary of that date.

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Unlike the first season, the second season episodes had titles with title cards included on the screen. This episode, entitled "Bad-Time Story" had Bugs hosting an introduction in which he demonstrated some of the gravitational laws of cartoon animation. This is a theme that was repeated throughout a number of episodes of the second season.

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Since the title is "Bad-Time Story", the first story is that of Hansel & Gretel in Bewitched Bunny.

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At the conclusion of Bewitched Bunny, Witch Hazel turned into Brigitte Bunny, and Bugs spends the remainder of the episode reading other stories when he is not pitching woo.

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The second story is Robin Hood in Robin Hood Daffy.

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Bugs closes the episode by telling the story of Tweety and the Beanstalk.

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The bridging sequences for this episode were produced by the Chuck Jones unit.
 

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Timothy E

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On October 17, 1961, the episode entitled Satan's Waitin' aired on the ABC TV network. The bridging footage for Satan's Waitin' was produced by the Friz Freleng unit.

The episode began with Hare Trimmed, in which Yosemite Sam plots to fleece Granny of her newly inherited fortune.

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Bugs steps in to protect Granny, and Sam finds himself in H-E-L-L after receiving the bad end of a safe. Sam begs Satan for one more chance, and he is given the opportunity to return to life only if he will bring another one to replace him.

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Sam has Bugs specifically in mind, and in a flash he finds himself in Hollywood at the studio producing the next Bugs Bunny film. The bridging footage for this sequence uses original footage from Roman Legion-Hare.

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The lions sent after Bugs decide instead to pursue Sam and the director, modeled after Charles Laughton. The result is that Sam finds himself back in the bad place, and is given another chance to bring Bugs back in his place, which segues into Sahara Hare.

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After Sam is blown to kingdom come, he is back where he started from, and he is told that he will get one final chance and that is it. Sam responds that he is through with trying to escape, and tells Satan that if he wants Bugs, he can get him, because "I'm stayin'" as he says with a devilish laugh.

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Satan's Waitin' (1954) was originally a theatrical short starring Tweety and Sylvester. Sylvester's attempts to eat Tweety resulted in him being sent to face Satan for his bad deeds. Sylvester persuaded the dark lord to give him another chance, and Sylvester repeatedly failed in his attempts until he used up all of his 9 lives as a cat.

This was such a good concept that it was modified by the Freleng unit to create a complete episode of The Bugs Bunny Show in 1961. This formula was recycled again in Devil's Feud Cake (1963), which reused footage from this episode for one of the final Bugs Bunny theatrical shorts. Freleng revived this concept one final time as the first chapter of The Looney, Looney, Looney Bugs Bunny Movie (1981).
 

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Timothy E

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I can now confirm that there are 2 different network versions of episode 25, which aired originally on March 28, 1961. In both versions, Daffy Duck's efforts to host The Bugs Bunny Show were thwarted by the Tasmanian Devil. Although the same bridging animation was used in both versions, which was produced by the Robert McKimson unit, the cartoon shorts in each version are different. The shorts included in the first version were Henhouse Henery(1949), Curtain Razor(1949), and Devil May Hare(1954). The second version had the following shorts included: All Fowled Up(1955), Dog Collared(1950), and Bunny Hugged(1951). (Note that both sets of cartoons include a Foghorn, Porky, and Bugs cartoon in the same order, since both versions harmonize well with the bridging animation when substituted in the same order of sequence.)

Until recently, I believed that All Fowled Up(1955), Dog Collared(1950), and Bunny Hugged(1951) may have appeared originally in the episode when it first aired on March 28, 1961. The basis of my belief was the existence of a 16mm network print with these 3 cartoons listed in the credits at the end of the episode. (See below.)

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These closing credits are the most reliable reference for which shorts were included in the episode, and this 16mm print clearly shows the shorts as All Fowled Up(1955), Dog Collared(1950), and Bunny Hugged(1951). Although some shorts were swapped in and out of the episodes when shown on Saturday mornings beginning in 1962, the closing credits were never altered, to the best of my knowledge, and definitely not in any 16mm prints that I have reviewed. For example, a 16mm print from 1966 of season 2, episode 7 ("Ballpoint Puns") replaced Claws For Alarm with Room and Bird. I can verify that Claws For Alarm was the original short because Claws For Alarm was clearly indicated in the closing credits on the print from 1966. Did the network decide that Claws For Alarm was too creepy for children in the audience on Saturday morning? It is possible. Another possibility is that Claws For Alarm had been appropriated for appearance in The Porky Pig Show(1964-1967) and was no longer available in the same package of shorts when this episode aired on Saturday morning in 1966. If this was the case, then it is not surprising that one Sylvester cartoon(with Porky) was replaced with another Sylvester cartoon(sans Porky).

I recently located a 16mm print overseas which confirms that Henhouse Henery(1949), Curtain Razor(1949), and Devil May Hare(1954) appeared originally in the episode. These shorts are actually on the print, and more significantly, these shorts are listed in the closing credits as well. (See below.)

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Seeing is believing. We now have confirmation of 2 different versions of the same episode with 2 different sets of cartoon shorts used as the featured material.

Before seeing these 2 prints, all of the historical documentation that I had ever seen supported the fact that no shorts other than Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare were ever featured in this episode.

Robert McKimson's original script for this episode, which shows later dialogue changes interlineated on the pages, actually has Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare handwritten onto the script pages to show their intended placement in the episode. (See below.)
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I reviewed a 16mm print of the preceding episode, no. 24, on which the coming attractions portion at the end of the episode showed previews of Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare. This tends to confirm that this version of the episode is the one that aired originally on ABC-TV on March 28, 1961.

How do we explain the existence, then, of this alternate version of episode #25 featuring All Fowled Up, Dog Collared, and Bunny Hugged? I believe that this second version was prepared later, during the original production cycle of The Bugs Bunny Show, for airing as a rerun in primetime on the network.

Why were the changes made to this episode? Note the dialogue changes made on McKimson's script pages, which are the same as the final versions recorded with dialogue and animated for inclusion in the episode. Bugs' dialogue handwritten in on line 36 of the script pages ("All the woild loves a lover...") is almost identical to the dialogue spoken by Bugs in the ending of Devil May Hare(1954), which immediately precedes this portion of the script.

The producers of The Bugs Bunny Show may have realized this unnecessary repetition, either before or after the episode aired originally, and then switched out the shorts so that Bugs was not repeating the same dialogue approximately 1 minute later. This would seem to explain the substitution of Devil May Hare with Bunny Hugged. It does not explain the substitutions of the other cartoon shorts, however, unless that was an aesthetic judgment made when the Bugs cartoons were switched.

Does anyone have any other theories to explain 2 different versions of this episode? I do not know if any contemporaneous documentation still exists to explain this, but it is indisputable that there are 2 alternate versions of this episode. This leads one to wonder if there are alternate versions of any other episodes from its primetime run on ABC-TV from 1960 to 1962.
 

Mark Y

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I can now confirm that there are 2 different network versions of episode 25, which aired originally on March 28, 1961. In both versions, Daffy Duck's efforts to host The Bugs Bunny Show were thwarted by the Tasmanian Devil. Although the same bridging animation was used in both versions, which was produced by the Robert McKimson unit, the cartoon shorts in each version are different. The shorts included in the first version were Henhouse Henery(1949), Curtain Razor(1949), and Devil May Hare(1954). The second version had the following shorts included: All Fowled Up(1955), Dog Collared(1950), and Bunny Hugged(1951). (Note that both sets of cartoons include a Foghorn, Porky, and Bugs cartoon in the same order, since both versions harmonize well with the bridging animation when substituted in the same order of sequence.)

Until recently, I believed that All Fowled Up(1955), Dog Collared(1950), and Bunny Hugged(1951) may have appeared originally in the episode when it first aired on March 28, 1961. The basis of my belief was the existence of a 16mm network print with these 3 cartoons listed in the credits at the end of the episode. (See below.)

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These closing credits are the most reliable reference for which shorts were included in the episode, and this 16mm print clearly shows the shorts as All Fowled Up(1955), Dog Collared(1950), and Bunny Hugged(1951). Although some shorts were swapped in and out of the episodes when shown on Saturday mornings beginning in 1962, the closing credits were never altered, to the best of my knowledge, and definitely not in any 16mm prints that I have reviewed. For example, a 16mm print from 1966 of season 2, episode 7 ("Ballpoint Puns") replaced Claws For Alarm with Room and Bird. I can verify that Claws For Alarm was the original short because Claws For Alarm was clearly indicated in the closing credits on the print from 1966. Did the network decide that Claws For Alarm was too creepy for children in the audience on Saturday morning? It is possible. Another possibility is that Claws For Alarm had been appropriated for appearance in The Porky Pig Show(1964-1967) and was no longer available in the same package of shorts when this episode aired on Saturday morning in 1966. If this was the case, then it is not surprising that one Sylvester cartoon(with Porky) was replaced with another Sylvester cartoon(sans Porky).

I recently located a 16mm print overseas which confirms that Henhouse Henery(1949), Curtain Razor(1949), and Devil May Hare(1954) appeared originally in the episode. These shorts are actually on the print, and more significantly, these shorts are listed in the closing credits as well. (See below.)

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Seeing is believing. We now have confirmation of 2 different versions of the same episode with 2 different sets of cartoon shorts used as the featured material.

Before seeing these 2 prints, all of the historical documentation that I had ever seen supported the fact that no shorts other than Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare were ever featured in this episode.

Robert McKimson's original script for this episode, which shows later dialogue changes interlineated on the pages, actually has Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare handwritten onto the script pages to show their intended placement in the episode. (See below.)
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I reviewed a 16mm print of the preceding episode, no. 24, on which the coming attractions portion at the end of the episode showed previews of Henhouse Henery, Curtain Razor, and Devil May Hare. This tends to confirm that this version of the episode is the one that aired originally on ABC-TV on March 28, 1961.

How do we explain the existence, then, of this alternate version of episode #25 featuring All Fowled Up, Dog Collared, and Bunny Hugged? I believe that this second version was prepared later, during the original production cycle of The Bugs Bunny Show, for airing as a rerun in primetime on the network.

Why were the changes made to this episode? Note the dialogue changes made on McKimson's script pages, which are the same as the final versions recorded with dialogue and animated for inclusion in the episode. Bugs' dialogue handwritten in on line 36 of the script pages ("All the woild loves a lover...") is almost identical to the dialogue spoken by Bugs in the ending of Devil May Hare(1954), which immediately precedes this portion of the script.

The producers of The Bugs Bunny Show may have realized this unnecessary repetition, either before or after the episode aired originally, and then switched out the shorts so that Bugs was not repeating the same dialogue approximately 1 minute later. This would seem to explain the substitution of Devil May Hare with Bunny Hugged. It does not explain the substitutions of the other cartoon shorts, however, unless that was an aesthetic judgment made when the Bugs cartoons were switched.

Does anyone have any other theories to explain 2 different versions of this episode? I do not know if any contemporaneous documentation still exists to explain this, but it is indisputable that there are 2 alternate versions of this episode. This leads one to wonder if there are alternate versions of any other episodes from its primetime run on ABC-TV from 1960 to 1962.
Thanks for the info, that's interesting. I am also under the impression that some of the cartoons in the shows were changed in 1964 when Porky Pig was spun off onto his own show. It seems the Porky cartoons on "The Bugs Bunny Show" were replaced with other cartoons, but in a few shows I have which are examples of this, the original cartoon is still listed in the closing credits.

Even as a young kid in the 1970s watching "The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show," I noticed that Porky rarely appeared, though his cartoons were often shown locally on WGN-Channel 9 in Chicago. After "The Porky Pig Show" ended, the cartoons from that show were combined with the infamous "redrawn" colorized cartoons and placed in syndication.
 

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Timothy E

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On October 31, 1961, "Omni-Puss" aired on the ABC Network as the 4th episode of season 2 of The Bugs Bunny Show. The theme of the episode, as suggested by the title, was cats. Bugs began the episode by showing a slide show of different types of cats.
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Each of the theatrical shorts included in "Omni-Puss" featured a cat, beginning with Sylvester showing his son how he guards the County Museum against mice, even giant mice, in Mouse-Taken Identity(1957).
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The next cat to be featured was Pussyfoot, as Marc Antony tried to show their master that the cat is carrying his weight as a mouser in Kiss Me Cat(1953).
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Finally, a cat on the French Riviera was the object of Pepe's affections in Heaven Scent(1956).
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The bridging animation for "Omni-Puss" was produced by the Chuck Jones unit, with many of the cats showing the stylized Jones design.
 

Timothy E

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On November 7, 1961, birds were the theme of the episode of The Bugs Bunny Show in "Tired and Feathered." As with the cat-themed episode of the previous week, Bugs presented a slide show of cartoon ornithology, which led into cartoon shorts featuring birds.

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Tweety was the first bird to be featured in a cartoon short in this episode as Sylvester and Granny dealt with the obstacles to getting food to the house in Snow Business(1953).

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In Two Crows From Tacos(1956), Jose and Manuel chased a grasshopper as their intended meal.

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Wile E. Coyote enjoyed the same lack of success in acquiring his dinner as did the crows in the previous short in Ready.. Set.. Zoom!(1955).

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