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Why I Own So Many Movies.

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Mike Frezon, Sep 18, 2018.

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  1. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    The idea of having that much space to be able to do that makes me happy. I wish I did!

    On the other hand, nothing is forever and I’m getting a rude reminder of that as I’m transferring much of my collection to a HTPC. There are several discs of mine that have gone bad. It’s not a huge percentage but it’s unpredictable as to when a problem will strike. Best cases have been movies that are readily available and inexpensive to replace. But I also had one disc from a long out of print and outrageously expensive to replace set go bad, and some individual discs from TV on DVD/BD sets.

    So I see those shelves and they make me smile but also make me feel a little worry too. Most will be fine; some won’t; and you won’t know about it until it’s too late.
     
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  2. titch

    titch Supporting Actor

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    The gentleman in the YouTube video is not concerned about everything being functional. The point of this collection is a display of everything that he has purchased, from VHS cassettes, through obsolete video disc formats, to the latest 4K UHD discs. In addition, he has mounted a sizeable collection of memorabilia, which wouldn't look out of place in Guillermo Del Toro's house. It is quite beautifully laid out, all the better to display wonderful cover art. It's like a museum showing a lifetime passion. I'm sure I could wander around that basement for hours. It's like bygone days in the early 1980s, when I would peruse all the videos in the store, thrilled by discovery.
     
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  3. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    And that’s the part that I totally love. And I think I always will.
     
  4. Ronnie Bernier

    Ronnie Bernier Auditioning

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  5. Ronnie Bernier

    Ronnie Bernier Auditioning

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    Have been collector thru vhs,laserdisc up to current blu/ray 4K. Meeting with other film buffs, they revealing 3 to 4 thousand discs, I thought my 500 or so collection was too much. Funny how when people see my collection now, they reply...” OMG..are those all movies? But...if it was a (book) library..they excitedly say...Wow. Are those all books? It’s great to have your own personal film library. Whatever the reaction, it’s nobody’s business. Hell, I knew somebody who collected meat grinders. Check on Theo Kalimorakes website and see how many he has. from Ronnie Bernier
     
  6. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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  7. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    That's an interesting article, Carlo...with a very interesting take on the topic.

    Although it might be better served in one of the threads on physical media vs. streaming.

    Personally, I'm hoping to do a complete overhaul of my collection in the next few months (a good winter's project!). This will include a thinning (more of a massive purge, actually) as I remove films that I know I won't want to watch again. This has nothing to do with an uptick of streaming on my part. While I got in on that great introductory price to Disney+, I doubt I'll even bother to renew it when it expires. I also have access to Amazon Prime but watch very little there.

    For me, it's more a case of space limitations and continued disc purchases. And, most importantly, the realization that I am getting of an age where I need to lighten my load and realize I just don't need to keep certain films on my shelves that I am never going to take down to watch again. And while I am NOT obsessing over what's going to hap-pen to my collection after my death, I realize that neither of my kids will have the slightest interest in any of it. And my wife might have an interest in keeping maybe a couple dozen titles that she would ever pull out to watch.
     
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  8. Worth

    Worth Producer

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    It's already in this one:

    https://www.hometheaterforum.com/community/posts/4824468/
     
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  9. timk1041

    timk1041 Second Unit

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    Sad, but true.
     
  10. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    I figure my collection will not be considered a family heirloom either. My wife will probably grab the copy of “Princess Bride” that she brought into the relationship and that’ll be that.

    I think I had a really great collection that perfectly suited my tastes and interests and needs until about 2014 or so, and then I just went crazy and justified buying things instead of renting because I had just gotten better gear to watch on and was getting a lot of great deals. But my collection took up two shelving units for nearly the entirety of my collecting life, and then in five years blew up to needing six units. That was just dumb on my part. In hindsight, for occasions when I bought discs because they cost the same or less than a rental, I should’ve considered them rentals and sold them off after viewing. Now I’m stuck with stuff I’ll never watch again that no one else wants either. Lesson learned.

    I’ve been working on thinning my collection for a year and trying to return it to something more reflective of its original intent (movies I love that I enjoy rewatching, not simply movies that I’ve seen). It’s really rewarding to see my favorites up there standing out instead of buried in between a sea of titles I’m indifferent about.
     
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  11. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    At least you learned it at a young age. I'm too old to do much about it. Although my thinning-out project is due to begin soon. :thumbsup:
     
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  12. Message #212 of 228 Jan 26, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020
    jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    (More generally).

    I've generally always considered my "stuff" will likely not become a heirloom at all. I never owned much of anything that was valuable.

    Going back further in time, I encountered this first hand when my relatives were cleaning out the house of a then-recently passed away grandparent. By coincidence it just happened that I was visiting these relatives at the time, and noticed there was a stack of old technical books which caught my interest. I asked them about these books, where they mentioned that they were just going to throw them away since nobody in their extended family in the region was a technical / engineering type of person. I mentioned that I was an engineering major in college, where they just gave me this big box of ancient technical / math books.

    (On a closer inspection when I tried reading these books, they were in German with writing that stated dates from 1931 to 1933 and the University of Berlin. I then realized these books were sitting in Israel on a bookshelf for over 60 years, and that my granduncle and grandaunt lived in Berlin, Germany in the early->mid 1930s).
     
  13. John Dirk

    John Dirk Cinematographer
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    Wow! That sounds like some valuable content to me. I've never even given much thought to what might happen to my collection after my departure from this existence. I do worry about my journal entries as I've made it a habit to write one pretty much every day for over 20 years. On the one hand, it would be nice if my family could have this content available for posterity but, on the other, a few of them might not like some of it's content. :) What can you do???
     
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  14. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    The family historical context was interesting. The actual content of these books wasn't as interesting. As far as I could figure out, it was stuff that would be covered in college subjects like calculus, algebra, physics, mechanics, etc ... that an engineering major would cover in freshman and sophomore years nowadays. (I recognized the equations right away).
     
  15. cineMANIAC

    cineMANIAC Cinematographer

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    When did owning a large collection of movies become something akin to a mental disorder? That's how it feels listening to people whimsically talk about those of us who "still" collect physical media and predict the end of it. I'm sorry the general public is no longer enamored of their video libraries (absolutely no one complained about it 20 years ago) but I would never give up my collection for ANYTHING. Crazy, eh?
     
  16. Worth

    Worth Producer

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    I think there's a false assumption at play here - I don't think the general public ever collected. The average person might have had a handful of favourites, but most people were always primarily renters.
     
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  17. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    Probably the lumping/conflating in of generic hobbist collectors (whether movies, comic books, etc ....), with the extreme hoarding types on reality tv.
     
  18. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    I think a lot of people dabbled and did impulse buys when DVD first came out, was easy to find in stores, and was cheap and hassle free compared to going to a store, hoping they had the title you wanted, renting it and then having to return it. But I think people realized they weren’t watching their purchases enough to justify continuing to make them, and the Netflix-by-mail model ended up being a great innovation for many people. Disc sales peaked in the early-to-mid 2000s.

    Once something came along that made it possible to watch what you wanted without owning it, that was the end of the mass public’s flirtation with ownership. Buying a disc was always a mean to an end for most people; the disc collecting part wasn’t the actual hobby, the watching a movie with less steps than a VHS rental was.
     
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  19. JohnRice

    JohnRice Executive Producer

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    When I was doing Architectural Photography full time, I shot a lot of multi million $ houses during a time when it was fashionable for them to have dedicated theaters. Later, that changed to multi-use rooms. There was a lot of money put into the theaters. One family had spent well over $100K on theirs. The seats cost $7K each, it had silk wall coverings, gold accents, and so on. It was a very large front projection system... using a $500 data projector, a mid-line Denon receiver and lower end Polk speakers and a single 10" Polk subwoofer. They owned maybe 5 movies on DVD total. I never saw a single house, no matter how fancy their theater was, where they owned more than a handful of movies.

    ...just sayin'...
     
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  20. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    Of course. The video store and Netflix by mail works just as well for rich people as it does for working class people. I would imagine that you’re gonna find far more people in those scenarios using those rooms to watch the big game than anything else.
     

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