Why I Own So Many Movies.

jcroy

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But most movies I tend to only watch once, so a rental is fine.
I don't even bother doing this anymore for most recent/current films.

I can wait for such stuff to show up on basic cable or even network tv. It may not be "fresh" anymore two+ years later, but now I can see the actual film without any then-current hype from media coverage.

In the end for most stuff I wait 2+ years to watch in this manner, it turns out they were largely mediocre or outright crap. Not even a worthwhile $5 (or less) dump bin impulse buy bluray.
 

Robert Crawford

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I don't even bother doing this anymore for most recent/current films.

I can wait for such stuff to show up on basic cable or even network tv. It may not be "fresh" anymore two+ years later, but now I can see the actual film without any then-current hype from media coverage.

In the end for most stuff I wait 2+ years to watch in this manner, it turns out they were largely mediocre or outright crap. Not even a worthwhile $5 (or less) dump bin impulse buy bluray.
If you don't want to own any movies any longer, isn't it strange to participate in a thread just for that purpose?;)
 

jcroy

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With all that being said, my disc purchases these days are mostly dvds of D-list (or lower) scifi movies released by bottom feeder movie companies/distributors such as The Asylum, etc ...

At $2 a pop (or less). (Such stuff isn't even released on bluray for many years).

Basically scifi stuff which is so horrible that they don't even show up on on basic cable channels.
 

benbess

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After slowing my buying of blu-rays during the past year to something close to zero, recently I've been on a buying binge. I've been rewatching my current collection at a pace of 1-2 movies a day during the quarantine, and I'm glad for the titles that are just sitting on the shelf waiting. Recently I've purchased 14 more Twilight Time blu-rays that should be delivered in the next week or so, and I have my eyes on some titles from Warner Archive and Criterion. Anyone have any guesses as to when the next Criterion sale might be? And does Warner Archive still do sales?
 

OLDTIMER

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Although I watch a lot of free-to-air movies (which I record on my PVR to skip the ads) plus a few streaming, I'm still buying Blu-rays. For one thing, picture quality is almost always better, plus I can watch them at leisure. If I buy a disc that's a bummer, I don't worry about waste of money because it's always cheaper than taking my wife to see the movie at a cinema.
 
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Pupp

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I don't have a gazillion movies, but I do tend to buy movies faster than I watch them. LOL

Back in the DVD days, it was cheap to buy DVDs in discount bins, then eventually move them to the basket of DVD's for exchange at the DVD store.

Now that I'm into collecting 4k movies, I have no intention of taking them to a movie rental place for credit. I don't just buy movies to own movies though. I generally have watched at least 90% of what's on my shelf, but I'm always looking for a bargain.
Once in a while, I'll go on a bender and watch like 5 unopened movies in 5 days, or even more if it's a holiday weekend.
 

English Invader

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Now that I'm into collecting 4k movies, I have no intention of taking them to a movie rental place for credit.
Good luck with that. I don't think those places even exist anymore (even online rental services like LoveFilm are gone).

There are a few resale joints like Cash Converters and CEX (in the UK) but you're not going to get very much for them because they don't sell - why pay £18 for a used UHD when you can buy a brand new copy elsewhere for £25?
 

Carlo Medina

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As I mentioned, I'm still primarily a physical media purchaser. But I do have a Netflix and HBO Max (through my phone provider) subscription. It seems that Charter (Spectrum) which is my cable and ISP company, is now looking to increase data fees for streaming services:


For those who rely primarily on streaming, this would be an unwelcome development.
 

Pupp

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I live in the sticks. I have a data limit that would be sucked bone dry in a few days if I was streaming movies.
 

Worth

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As I mentioned, I'm still primarily a physical media purchaser. But I do have a Netflix and HBO Max (through my phone provider) subscription. It seems that Charter (Spectrum) which is my cable and ISP company, is now looking to increase data fees for streaming services:


For those who rely primarily on streaming, this would be an unwelcome development.
That's interesting. The opposite seems to have happened in Canada, where unlimited plans are far more common and less expensive than they were a few years ago.
 

Carlo Medina

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What's infuriating about the Charter move is that when they were lobbying the FCC years ago, before the current Chairman was the Chair (google Ajit Pai if you aren't familiar with him and the beef that many people who support internet access and freedoms feel about him) is that they specifically cited their lack of data caps when they were attempting to acquire Time Warner and were being scrutinized over the acquisition.

Now that they have successfully acquired it, they're reversing field, and Pai is much more friendly to their request (he was in the dissenting camp back then) so this seems likely to go through.
 
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Mysto

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What's infuriating about the Charter move is that when they were lobbying the FCC years ago, before the current Chairman was the Chair (google Ajit Pai if you aren't familiar with him and the beef that many people who support internet access and freedoms feel about him) is that they specifically cited their lack of data caps when they were attempting to acquire Time Warner and were being scrutinized over the acquisition.

Now that they have successfully acquired it, they're reversing field, and Pai is much more friendly to their request (he was in the dissenting camp back then) so this seems likely to go through.
That is why the "cut the cord" gambit will only be short lived. The cable companies own the river and can dam it and charge for the stream any time they desire. Less revenue from programs will result in higher fees for internet at some point in the future.
 

Pupp

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I dunno. Some new interlink was invented this year that will allow a massive amount of data to go over the internet backbone, so all the major providers will be installing those once the equipment is in production. The chip was invented, now they have to invent equipment to take advantage of the chip.. all while the pandemic keeps raging on.

That means at some point in the next couple years, the internet backbones will be able to effectively multiply the amount of data they're currently able to handle. From what I'm understanding, the backbone capacity will eventually catch up, then easily exceed the amount of data one could expect if most customers were streaming 4k. Not right away, but certainly between 2025 and 2030, Between now and the end of 2023, it should be enough capacity that the average home user wouldn't notice it. The internet depends greatly on the time of day, so evenings and certain times on weekends, and also certain holidays, is when demand strips out backbone capacity.

So I wouldn't spend too much time obsessing about the lack of backbone capacity, which is the ultimate driver of internet data capacity, since it will greatly improve in the next few years, with year over year improvements every year. Probably not in 2020 though, since the chip was just invented, and I don't think it's in production yet.

I'd say nearly every politician in Washington D.C. knows little if anything about total backbone capacity. It never gets any press coverage unless something is invented that will increase capacity a significant amount. (Even without major developments, backbone capacity grows every year anyway, so it takes something truly monumental to catch the eye of the press.)
 

Carlo Medina

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It's not a lack of backbone capacity I'm worried about. It's my ISP appealing to be able to charge more for use of streaming services.
 

Worth

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It's not new, but anyone interested in the future of physical media should listen to this podcast episode that features an interview with Bill Olsen, who runs the cult-video label Code Red. It's sobering and depressing, but well worth listening to:
 

cinemel1

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In the early days of the Home Theater Forum, moderator Robert A. Fowkes (RAF) posted an essay entitled "Why Do I Own So Many Movies?

It's hard to believe, but that essay was written more than 25-years-ago...in 1992! But a lot of the ideas contained within are still valid for many HTF members today. It was written by Doug Pratt in the introduction to The Laser Video Disc Companion.

As RAF himself noted: "Even though it was written in pre-DVD days, it applies to this format as well and is as relevant as ever."

So let's talk about our collections and why having these movies is so important to us.

Note of warning. This is NOT a thread about physical media vs. streaming vs. digital ownership. Any posts that start to take the thread in that direction will be edited/removed.

This IS a thread about why we love the movies so much and why we want to have them in our personal collections.

HERE is the essay...including RAF's remarks about why he so often referred to it. Maybe you'd like to give some more contemporary examples of certain movies (or performances) that are important to you...and which are "must haves" in your own collection.

Or maybe you've had to answer that very question "How can you have so many videodiscs?!?" when posed by a member of your own family (maybe even your own spouse!) or a friend.

What's YOUR answer? :D
I just love physical media and always have. About 50 years ago a friend was visiting and he marveled at my collection of soundtrack albums. He told me that he thought I would like to own the films for every album in my collection. I laughed and said that could never happen. Little did I know what was coming. Starting in the mid 1970s I began recording movies on videocassettes and also buying them. I’ve been hooked ever since. I always prided myself on having an almost state of the art audio-video system (even tried quadraphonic sound). Then came Laserdiscs, DVD and blu-ray and presently 4K. Of course, now everyone is into streaming. I can’t complain, me too. During the current pandemic and the lockdown streaming was a blessing. I was caught in my annual winter months in Florida, so I didn’t have my extensive collection handy. Now I’m looking forward to going back to NY (LI) and my wonderful physical media collection. There’s something about the mail arriving with a new movie. The special editions of GWTW, Ben-Hur, The 10 Commandments, the Wizard of Oz, The Sound of Music, and Scarface are proudly displayed around my home theatre. When friends come to visit it is such fun to have them pick out a movie to watch. As the collection grows, space to house it diminishes. 2 disc blu-ray cases are used to put sequels (i.e. The Robe, Demetrius & the Gladiators) together. Re-sorting movies by series (Superman, Marvel), release companies (Criterion, Twilight Time), best picture oscar winners, also help out. So there you have it: it’s a hobby and an expensive one, but such fun. A 10 year old member of the family was visiting about 10 years ago and asked me innocently: who’s going to get your collection when you die? I said, as a matter of fact: you!
I’ve given him an appreciation of films and he often borrows them to show his own friends.
It’s been worth every cent!
 

English Invader

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I just love physical media and always have. About 50 years ago a friend was visiting and he marveled at my collection of soundtrack albums. He told me that he thought I would like to own the films for every album in my collection.
I found a copy of the soundtrack for Five Easy Pieces in a record store recently and one of the things that struck me about it is that it seemed to be comprised of the Tammy Wynette songs that are featured in the film, the classical piano pieces and key dialogue moments from the film as though it was intended to re-create the film experience for those who wanted a permanent copy before home video existed.

This was the film that told me that my interest in films was different to other people's. I first came across it as the second film in a double-bill VHS tape with As Good As It Gets and while I loved FEP the rest of my family hated it. They found it dated and boring while I was completely captivated by it and saw so much more in it than they did.
 

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