Why I Own So Many Movies.

Worth

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You know why I have so many movies, and TV shows ? I enjoy watching them!
Sure, but you can enjoy watching them just as much without owning them.
 

Rodney

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I cannot speak for Lou, but for me, part of the enjoyment is the owning, and for me makes it even more enjoyable.

Knowing I can watch it even if my internet connection is down, and knowing that it won't be tampered with, augmented, changed, enhanced, enlightened, or made no longer available, which cannot be said for a copy that isn't in my physical possession (no matter what the form, a physical disk or a copy on my computer or NAS device).

These are some of the emotional and rationale reasons I enjoy owning films.
 

HawksFord

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Sure, but you can enjoy watching them just as much without owning them.
I'm probably an outlier because the number of movies I own is small (by the standards of this site, I mean) and I've increased my buying in the last few years. But what moved me from streaming to disc was how frustrating it was to find something I wanted to watch. We'd be in the mood to watch an older film, but Netflix (which I canceled a couple of years ago) and Amazon Prime (which I still have) would be pushing TV series and recent films. We'd spend too much time flipping between the apps and navigating their selections. For me, it's a much more enjoyable experience to pull something off the shelf and pop it in the blu-ray player.
 

Josh Steinberg

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But that’s sort of an apple to oranges comparison. The digital equivalent to discs isn’t a streaming subscription from Netflix or Prime; those things are akin to an HBO subscription in the days when cable ruled supreme. The equivalent to an a la carte purchase of an individual title on disc is an a la carte purchase of an individual title on a digital storefront like iTunes or Vudu.

That’s not to say that there isn’t an intangible joy in curating a collection of discs when doing so is your hobby; but it’s a misconception to suggest that only discs allow you to have the choice of what title to view when you want to view it.
 

HawksFord

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it’s a misconception to suggest that only discs allow you to have the choice of what title to view when you want to view it.
Of course, and I didn't say anything like that. All I'm saying is that for me it's a lot easier to enjoy watching the movies if it's easy to get to them.
 
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LouA

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Sure, but you can enjoy watching them just as much without owning them.
Fine . You stream and I'll watch my discs . I'll bet a lot of the stuff I have on DVD isn't available to download or for streaming . Things like the People's Choice ( I have almost every episode ) The Gray Ghost , etc.
 

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I'm probably an outlier because the number of movies I own is small (by the standards of this site, I mean) and I've increased my buying in the last few years. But what moved me from streaming to disc was how frustrating it was to find something I wanted to watch. We'd be in the mood to watch an older film, but Netflix (which I canceled a couple of years ago) and Amazon Prime (which I still have) would be pushing TV series and recent films. We'd spend too much time flipping between the apps and navigating their selections. For me, it's a much more enjoyable experience to pull something off the shelf and pop it in the blu-ray player.
I have commented on this problem with streaming myself.

I have yet to try streaming but I will at some point in the future.

But which one do I use?

Hulu, Netflix, Disnep +, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, ITunes, You Tube & Vudu.

All with their own unique content and some with titles which are only on a few channels and other channels that have titles you can't watch on others.

It's a mess!
 

The Drifter

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After thinking about doing this for a while, I recently got a couple of nice Binders and decided to transfer most (but not all) of my DVD/Blu collection to these. Wow. What a huge improvement this makes!! This is a game-changer for me, and I wish I had done this a long time ago. The benefits are amazing:

-No longer do I have boxes of bulky, ugly packaging taking up valuable room in my place. Given that I have so many disks, I had a lot of my TV shows/movies scattered/stored in various places, making it tough to remember what I even had at times.

-The binders are compact, and obviously take up a lot less room than the DVD boxes/cases. Going along with the above, it's a hell of a lot easier to find shows/movies in binders because everything is right there in front of you. This is especially true with TV shows, when you're not sure how many disks are in a boxed set unless/until you open this up.

For the most part, I also find having the Disks in binders aesthetically nicer than TV shows on DVD/Blu sets, DVD/Blu cases, etc.

-I feel the Disks are safer this way than they would be in a lot of the packaging I have, especially TV shows on DVD. In a lot of cases, these TV Shows were inserted into tight plastic tabs that damaged (in at least one case) or could potentially damage the disk itself. Back in the days when I was renting DVD's, there were numerous times I got a DVD out & there were hairline cracks in the plastic off of the circular hole in the middle; this was obviously due to tension caused by the DVD being inserted/taken out/re-inserted into the plastic tab.

Also, I always hated the TV show(s) packaging when a Disk was overlapping another Disk in the case. Not only did I not like the way this looked, but it's an obviously sloppy design designed to save space - to the detriment of the disk(s) themselves.

-Unlike a lot of people, I don't have these alphabetized (too much time & effort), but do definitely keep TV series/seasons all together.
 
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The Drifter

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Going along with my last post, I am not putting all of my Disks into Binders. I'm keeping some of them in the original packaging, and/or modifying the way some of them are packaged. Among others, I'm keeping:

-The 2011 Taxi Driver Blu; great cardboard packaging with collectible pictures, etc.

--The Fast & The Furious 7-disk set (got for a great price @ Big Lots last year).

I have also gotten rid of all of those crummy Eco cases.

Also, some of my Blu cases carry two Disks (one on either side), and I am combining the following films in one case - this is if I really like one of the covers & want to keep this:

-La Femme Nikita / Point of No Return (re-make)

-Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome / Mad Max Fury Road

-Casino Royale / Quantum of Solace

-Terminator 2 / Terminator 3
 

Worth

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I have commented on this problem with streaming myself.

I have yet to try streaming but I will at some point in the future.

But which one do I use?

Hulu, Netflix, Disnep +, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, ITunes, You Tube & Vudu.

All with their own unique content and some with titles which are only on a few channels and other channels that have titles you can't watch on others.

It's a mess!
If you're mainly interested in movies, I'd get an Apple TV and go with iTunes, which, in my opinion, has the best picture quality - just a notch below blu-ray. It's basically an online video store, not a subscription service, so you rent/buy each title on an individual basis, and it has pretty much every title available on all of those other streaming services, minus a handful of exclusives. It also has a surprising number of classics and a large number of films in HD which are currently only available on DVD.
 

Blu Eye

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If you're mainly interested in movies, I'd get an Apple TV and go with iTunes, which, in my opinion, has the best picture quality - just a notch below blu-ray. It's basically an online video store, not a subscription service, so you rent/buy each title on an individual basis, and it has pretty much every title available on all of those other streaming services, minus a handful of exclusives. It also has a surprising number of classics and a large number of films in HD which are currently only available on DVD.
I will have a look at it.

Sounds expensive if you watch a lot of movies on a weekly basis assuming you rent the film.
 

Worth

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I will have a look at it.

Sounds expensive if you watch a lot of movies on a weekly basis assuming you rent the film.
It's a lot cheaper than buying discs.
 

Carlo Medina

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SeanSKA

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I'm sure the streaming services have tons of stuff from the 80s-2010s, but how are they on films from the 30s, 40s, and 50s, and foreign films ? I stream on Netflix and hulu, and rent an occassional new release on Amazon (caught "Bombshell" last week), but for things I really love, I'd rather spring for a copy that would be mine forever, and I have permanantly, and not be at the mercy of whatever streaming service might have what I'm looking for. And these days, you can find a lot of bargains on DVD and Blu-ray if you wait and look around
 

Clinton McClure

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Doesn't that depend on how often you re-watch the discs?
I have terrible internet and streaming is spotty at the best of times so I regularly rewatch discs from my collection on Saturday and Sunday mornings while my wife sleeps. It’s a relatively small collection compared to some here on HTF (255 titles) but they are movies I greatly enjoy and can watch regularly without growing bored of them.
 

Robin9

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I have terrible internet and streaming is spotty at the best of times so I regularly rewatch discs from my collection on Saturday and Sunday mornings while my wife sleeps. It’s a relatively small collection compared to some here on HTF (255 titles) but they are movies I greatly enjoy and can watch regularly without growing bored of them.
Most of my viewing is also of discs I bought ages ago which Is why I put the question. If a disc costs $20.00, the second time you watch it the cost is $10.00 per viewing. The fifth time you watch it, the cost per viewing has gone down to $4.00
 

Worth

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Doesn't that depend on how often you re-watch the discs?
That's why I still buy discs for films I know I'm going to watch several times. But most movies I tend to only watch once, so a rental is fine.
 

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