1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

Tempted to upgrade projector, for the first time in nearly a decade...

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Colin Dunn, Jul 27, 2017.

  1. Colin Dunn

    Colin Dunn Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 1998
    Messages:
    738
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    610
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Real Name:
    Colin Dunn
    I've been using a Panasonic PT-AE3000U projector for a long, long time. Of course, current generation 1080p projectors are brighter and have better color, but with the arrival of 4K, I kept telling myself, "Oh, I'll wait for 4K projectors to come down in price." Problem is, true 4K (3840x2160) projector prices have been stubbornly stuck around $8,000 and haven't come down.

    The pixel-shifting on 1080p LCDs didn't excite me, as the pixels had considerable overlap.

    But now it seems "wobulated" DLPs are coming to market with half-4K resolution (2716x1528 native). Add pixel shifting and you get a lot closer to a true 3840x2160 image. Close enough that for $2,000-$2,500 for an Optoma UHD60 or 65, I'm finally thinking it's time for an upgrade.

    The downside of this wobulated half-4K DMD, though, is that it doesn't support 3D. Having 3D would be nice so I don't have to keep around a 73" Mitsubishi DLP RPTV for 3D content.

    So, my questions...

    1) Is the DLP pixel overlap less or nonexistent as compared to LCD pixel-shifting?
    2) UHD60 or 65? The 65 adds interpolating modes, but I don't use those on the Panasonic (don't like the "soap opera effect"). My viewing is mostly movies, so the slower frame rates (24 or 30Hz) are more appealing to me than smoothing things out at 120Hz. But the 65 has an RGBRGB color wheel, whereas the 60 has an RGBCY wheel (clear segment). I've been living with about 400 calibrated lumens, so even the ~850 calibrated lumens of the UHD65 will be a big jump in brightness. The UHD60 probably doesn't achieve much more brightness when calibrated for accurate color in a home theater.
    3) These projectors don't have 3D. Others coming out soon aren't going to, either. But now that affordable 4K is finally here, maybe I should go to a two-projector setup. A 1080p DLP (needs to support DLP-Link) for 3D content, and then the Optoma UHD60 or UHD65 for 4K content. Any recommendations of a DLP-Link capable 1080p projector that's affordable on the used market?
     
  2. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    22,002
    Likes Received:
    3,580
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    I can't help with the 4K decision. I can only commiserate that this is a tough time for projector enthusiasts. 1080p 3D projectors are high quality and well under $3000, but 4K is still around $10k. Or there's "FauxK" with no HDR for under $5000 with quality options for near $2500 -- what I pad for an HD projector a year ago

    I don't know. I bought HD last year planning to buy 4K maybe in 2019. If I were shopping today...I'd buy a pseudo 4K for $2500, forgo 3D, and plan / hope to upgrade to to true 4K UHD in a couple years.
     

Share This Page