IR or RF

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Don.l, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. Don.l

    Don.l Stunt Coordinator

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    I am trying to decide on what kind of system I want for remote control of AV components. I could really use some opinions. Let me explain a little. My setup is a follows: HT is app. 11' X 22'. In the back of the HT in a built in shelf unit will be my AV components. I will have a projector ceiling mounted and will be about 14' away from the fron wall. My screen will go up and down and will be motorized. Now, I anticipate the need to be able to control about 8 devices with my remote. I will have 6 AV components and then the projector and also the screen. So, if I go with a IR system I will need to have the eye in the front of the room, and the cable will need to run approximately 35' It will be under the screen and go up the front wall, over the ceiling and all the way back to the box where the emitters will come out. I think that kind of distance isn't good is it? I was looking at the Hot Link system and they have a 25' extension cable for the eye and they don't reccomend going any further.

    So, to avoid all of this problem I was considering RF. Anyone use RF? What are the pros and cons of RF.

    Thanks for any help anyone can offer.

    Don
     
  2. Adam Gregorich

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    I use RF and have no problems. I would run the wire so you can do either. I have worked in some installs where there was too much interference so RF worked poorly (nearby TV transmitters), but it works fine at my house and in the other installs I've used it in. Get one with an addressable RF reciever. The best thing about RF is you don't have to point the remote at the IR "eye".
     
  3. JeffCar

    JeffCar Agent

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    Don, Don't forget about lighting.... it is usually preferred to have the lighting controlled remotely as well. I am assuming that you are thinking of using a Pronto or something like that, and you will want to hook the lighting controls into the remote programming as well. My room is 14X19 and I will be using the Pronto with IR. My components will be up front, and so there will be able to address AV components directly, but my lighting controls are in the back of the room. I will use a remote IR repeater to pick up the signals fom the Pronto so that I don't have to shoot over my shoulder to control lighting. I have not implemented the "system" as yet, because I am still in the final throw s of construction, but it is wired that way and will hopefully perform as I have indicated. I will have glass fronts on the cabinet enclosure at the front of the room, so I won't have to worry about repeaters for the AV stuff.

    I am not a technical wizard when it comes to IR vs. RF, but from what I read, IR is good in a single room until you have a lot of things that are loocated out of your line of sight (solid door cabinets, other rooms, mult-rooms, etc). Then IR becomes more complicated, and RF becomes the choice. Others on this forum can chime in with more concrete information I am sure.

    Jeff
     
  4. Bud Huey

    Bud Huey Stunt Coordinator

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    If you have the ability, I would definately wire for the IR whether you plan to use it or not. Even if you buy a RF component you are still going to have some components in your system that are only IR compatible and not all IR codes work well with the IR-to-RF-to-IR converters.

    Some of the new products coming on the market with RF remotes are not Universal remote friendly. Because of the transmission distance of an RF remote a lot of companies have to use special "user ID" code that prevents problems in MDU (multi-dwelling units) such as apartment complexes. These special "user ID" codes become intellectual property of the code set developer and make it VERY difficult for remote control manufacturers to develop univeral remote controls that are compatible.

    Good Luck,
    Bud
     
  5. Don.l

    Don.l Stunt Coordinator

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    I think I am going to go with IR. The problem is distance. I don't know how it will work with all of components in the back of the room, and the eye in the front. Also, the screen will require an emitter and that will have to run all the way back to the back of the room where the box is located where the emitters come out.

    Here http://www.hometheaterforum.com/gall...g2_itemId=5722 is a link to a rough idea. Any suggestions anyone?

    Thanks
    Don
     
  6. Adam Gregorich

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    Don- use both. Use RF for the equipment in the back, and IR for the screen. Most RF remotes also support IR. You tell the remote which devices you want to control over IR and which over RF. In my master bedroom for example, I have a replay tv, Denon reciever and DVD player in the closet. I control all of these via IR over RF (IR emitters coming from the RF base above the equipment). My TV at the foot of the bed is controlled by IR from the remote, not run back to the closet.
     
  7. Brian Osborne

    Brian Osborne Stunt Coordinator

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    couple of things also on this. Your screen will make a great reflector for your IR signal, and you can hide an IR reciever behind a speaker grill if you don't want it seen.
    I've got my lights on the wall beside and behind the screen and all my equipment hidden in a room behind the screen. My IR reciever is hidden behind my center channel speaker grill. All controls can be done without pointing the remote anywhere but the front of the room. (this made it easier to do macros that included lights and projector)
     

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