Cats and Speaker question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Louis Di, Jul 31, 2001.

  1. Louis Di

    Louis Di Auditioning

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    Im considering adopting a cat; in the process im trying to figure out how "cat proof" my house is. So far my only worry is my Sub and speakers. They have a thin cloth face that looks like it can be torn easily (especially for a cat). Any advice on what to do to prevent the inevitible coming home to a shredded sub and speakers.
    Will buying one of those cat scratching posts help?
    do they sell protective covers or something that you can wrap the speakers in. (i have the speakers that came with the kenwood htb-502 unit).
    thanks
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Louis,
    Is this a full-grown cat, or a kitten? If it is a kitten I highly recommend having him de-clawed. The vets say that removing only the front claws still allows them to climb trees and fight, since they primarily use the back claws for these purposes.
    However, it usually is not good to de-claw a full-grown cat, as they may not adjust well to the change. If this is a mature cat, perhaps the previous owner trained him to use a scatching post. If not, you I’m sure there are some pet forums somewhere on the web where you could get some advice.
    It is more likely that the cat will damage the speaker grills than actually rip them. It took a few years before my speakers started looking bad. I simple replaced the grill cloth.
    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. Marianne

    Marianne Supporting Actor

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    Declawing doesn't just remove the claws, it also removes the equivalent of the top of the finger to the first knuckle. Veterinarians in Britain will not do it.
    Please don't declaw if the cat will be going outside. It won't be able to protect itself from another cat with full front claws.
    Cats can be trained not to scratch inappropriately and you can trim the claws yourself using special clippers. I trained my cat not to scratch the sofa by putting double-sided tape where it tried to scratch (they don't like anything sticky on their pads). After a while you can remove the tape because the cat will have 'learned' not to scratch there. A scratching post will help too.
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    Marianne
    "Gentlemen, you can't fight in here,
    this is the War Room Home Theater Forum!"
     
  4. Danny R

    Danny R Supporting Actor

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    Most pet stores sell small cardboard scratch pads that lie on the floor. These have catnip sprinkled on them, and our cats just love them and use nothing else. I almost feel guilty for bringing a fresh one home because they act like they are snorting drugs.
    Keep their nails trimmed helps as well. One reason cats scratch is in order to break off the excess nail coat (a fresh nail grows underneath).
    Also there are products like "Bitter Apple", which basically puts down a strong scent and taste that cats don't like, but is odorless to humans. Spray it around the speakers and they will avoid them.
     
  5. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    i've got two cats and amazingly they've never touched my speakers which sit directly on the floor. i have also heard that the double-sided tape manouver works pretty well.
    also, using some kind of deterrent when you see them in the process of going near the speaker helps. a very common technique is the "shake can" - which is a soda can filled with pennies. when you see the cat go near the speaker, shake the can. it scars the crap out of them and soon they learn not to go near the speaker. the key is to only do this at the right time - when you see them going near or actually scratching the speaker.
    cats are pretty cool...i think you'll enjoy having a new pet.
    ------------------
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    But the water has moved on.
    This page is not here.
     
  6. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    If your cat is going to spend some time outside, de-clawing it can be a bad idea, but anyway back to HTF question from the Home Cat Forum [​IMG], a scrathing post is certainly a way to handle the situation as it attracts the cat's attention from the sub and speakers. Your speaker grills are the culperit for cat scratching. For your front speakers if they are on stands that put them at least 3 feet above the ground then your problem will solve itself. As for the sub, I built my own subs and I use the protective metal grill you get from radio shack. I makes it look like disco speakers but it does the job.
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    If loving Home Theater is
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    right!!!
    [Edited last by Jerome Grate on July 31, 2001 at 11:49 AM]
     
  7. Eugene Hsieh

    Eugene Hsieh Supporting Actor

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    Heh. A few people have reported that after playing their subs loud with the cat in the room, the cats won't go anywhere near them.
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    Eugene Hsieh, VisorCentral FAQ Editor
    1000 km on a tank of gas??? Check out the Prius and drive the future now!
     
  8. Joseph Howard

    Joseph Howard Stunt Coordinator

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    My two cats leave all my speakers alone. For most cats,
    it seems to be a "discovery" issue. If you let them
    first "discover" a scratching post or beat up old chair
    that they can claw, then they will leave the speakers
    alone. If they first "discover" the speakers as the place
    to claw, then you will have a hard time breaking them
    of it.
    So, show them were to scratch first. And, they need the
    clawing option. You can't prevent the clawing so you must
    give them the location they can claw.
    Also, I agree that de-clawing is a brutal procedure for a
    cat. I've actually assisted in the operating room during
    many cat declaws (back when I was thinking about being
    a vet). It is tough on the cats and nerve damage complications
    can occur.
    --Joe
    [Edited last by Joseph Howard on July 31, 2001 at 11:58 AM]
     
  9. Howard_A

    Howard_A Stunt Coordinator

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    We have five cats and all of them but one still have their claws. Scratching is a serious concern in our house. [​IMG]
    The best advice I can give is to provide a variety of surfaces for your cat to use. Cats definitely have preferences and the only way you'll know what they are is to experiment. We've had good luck with sisal doormats, posts wrapped with sisal rope, and posts covered in carpet.
    You might cringe at paying $30 for a piece of wood covered with scrap carpet, but preventing ruined furniture, carpets, and curtains is well worth the expense. If you're handy you can probably manufacture your own scratching posts.
    That being said...I won't let my cats near my speakers. I only allow one cat in the theater at a time and only if he/she sits on my lap during the movie. [​IMG]
     
  10. Marty M

    Marty M Cinematographer

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    Howard_A has the right idea. If you give a cat an alternative to speakers and furniture it will be a great help. Be sure to have the scratching surfaces at your home when the cat arrives and place the cat near these surfaces.
    We have been fortuneate at our house we have a cat with claws but has not bothered my floor-standing speakers. I also agree that de-clawing is not a humane idea at all.
     
  11. Dennis Nicholls

    Dennis Nicholls Lead Actor

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    Also consider adopting an older cat (say 3 years old). They have outgrown the "kitten" stage where most of the damage occurs.
    ------------------
    Feline audience members Katie, Susie, Fluffy Pumpkin, and Naughty Tuxedo
     
  12. Andrew B

    Andrew B Agent

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    Here is my 2 cents, after living with a "problem" cat these suggestions should help [​IMG] I would have to vote against getting the cat declawed, its just too mean. I have 3 cats and so far they leave my speakers alone. I have found that giveing them something more preferable to scratch on works great. We have one of the cardboard scratching posts with the catnip on it. The cats love it and it only cost $15 Canadian [​IMG] We also had one of the cats (Bruce) chewing on the window blinds, shoe laces, any thing paper, power and speaker cords, etc.. (just like a dog). So I went to the dollar store and picked up a few small squirt guns [​IMG] Needless to say after a few squirts the cat no longer bothers with chewing on anything. This squirting method could also be used to discourage any intrest the cat may show in your speakers, and is much less cruel than getting it declawed (Bruce would not be able to chase deer without his front claws.... did I mention that Bruce is a bit weird?) Anyway I hope this helps
    Andrew
    PS Putting some funtack (the blue poster goo) under your front speaker will keep it from sliding off the top of the TV if your cat decides to go climbing across the top of your TV [​IMG] It saved my center speaker from a drop after Bruce decided to try and climb the TV/Wall one night... Think he was chasing a flying bug...
     
  13. Louis Di

    Louis Di Auditioning

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    Thanks for all the replies everyone.
    I'm not going to get him declawed,
    The scratching post and the cardboard catnip box sounds like a good idea.
    I'll probably get them before the cat .
    once again thanks to all
    lou
     
  14. Nicholas A. Gallegos

    Nicholas A. Gallegos Stunt Coordinator

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    I have two cats in my place, and I guess I'm lucky that they're both very gentle. They don't scratch ANYTHING but their post and pieces of cardboard I leave for them.
    About the declawing of a cat: I wouldn't do it. IMHO, it's inhumane. Declawing is generally done by people who refuse to take the time to properly train their cat. If you don't have time to train an animal, maybe you shouldn't be owning one to begin with. Like I said though, it's just my outlook on that and you don't necessarily have to agree with it.
    ------------------
    [Edited last by Nicholas A. Gallegos on July 31, 2001 at 03:20 PM]
     
  15. Jeremy Anderson

    Jeremy Anderson Screenwriter

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    The only part my cat can reach in my HT is the sub... and as luck would have it, the first time she sniffed around it and put her paw up, I had Fight Club paused right at the scene where the planes collide. After pressing play, let's just say that the cat now has the proper fear and respect for my sub... She hasn't touched it since. [​IMG]
     
  16. DaleB

    DaleB Stunt Coordinator

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    One 'cure' for subs on the floor is a metal grille in place, or behind the cloth covering.
     
  17. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    CATS: ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US!!!
    YOU HAVE NO CHANCE TO SURVIVE MAKE YOUR TIME!!!
    ------------------
    Philip Hamm
    AIM: PhilBiker
     
  18. Zbigniew

    Zbigniew Stunt Coordinator

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    2 cats, none declawed (both enjoy roaming outside the home); 1 subwoofer, 6 floor towers speakers, 1 CC.
    Older cat just loves to sit on top of amps and warm herself there. No speaker scratching noticed - they have a scratching post, and like to use door mat as another one.
    Oh yes - they like loud music.
    _zjt
     
  19. Eugene Hsieh

    Eugene Hsieh Supporting Actor

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  20. Louis Di

    Louis Di Auditioning

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    Where would i get a metal grill for my sub? Would i have to construct it,. or are they made to fit specific subs
    thanks again
     

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