1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

What's cooking?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by DaveF, Aug 24, 2014.

  1. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 1997
    Messages:
    27,570
    Likes Received:
    4,837
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
    Real Name:
    Sam Posten
    DaveF likes this.
  2. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    17,143
    Likes Received:
    20,640
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Josh Steinberg
    I’m a crazy person because I decided to make a new addition to the plate like four hours ago and have it on the stove now. If it comes out, I’ll describe it, if it fails, it’ll never be spoken of again :D
     
  3. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    22,252
    Likes Received:
    3,711
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    Spatchcocking and dry brining the turkey
    63A6C2A3-9B59-4F30-81AD-1E6522AD90E8. 4A88D7A0-D8D4-4C50-8DE3-BB8C31DD0D78. 00AA787D-05D1-4F90-A000-A283C619EA42. C2E7E980-C54F-436F-A9D5-187C4E01C6F5. B93D7244-8F58-43D0-930B-0C3B0DCD4720. 32C29F7F-2AA7-4139-9D71-ABCE43C1810A. F087DBCE-D10B-4243-A505-02E3D5A2A6B1. B8CEC0FC-454D-44EB-98A7-E0F4475AD13E. 346AE630-F4DC-4821-BBAF-4FA188BFC8BC. F7520DAF-FDD0-4407-89EE-35F27F3090A1.
     
    KPmusmag likes this.
  4. Message #1224 of 1303 Nov 27, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2019
    DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    22,252
    Likes Received:
    3,711
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    Got over half of prep done tonight. In particular I made the rolls tonigh. Unfortunately, I’m not impressed with them. I may jam in another rolls recipe tomorrow.

    Otherwise, tomorrow I have to do turkey, gravy, and mashed potatoes. Which is a pretty full morning of cooking.
     
    KPmusmag and Josh Steinberg like this.
  5. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    17,143
    Likes Received:
    20,640
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Josh Steinberg
    When I was a kid all through my first post-college decade, Thanksgiving was indisputably my father's holiday. The day was more or less traditional (at least, regionally traditional), beginning with Alice's Restaurant on the radio early in the afternoon (and "The Last Waltz" on TV later in the day) as all sorts of sides were assembled to complement the main bird, which would have been carefully chosen and ordered in advance, and prepared with whatever trend was in vogue at the time (there were the spatchcocking years, the brining years, the smoking years, etc). Family would gather round the table, and even though my parents were divorced, my mother and stepfather were always invited and often joined in. Dinner was usually around 6pm, so as to allow us non-morning folk to work up an appetite during the day, while also allowing the elderly guests to depart by 8pm.

    The main meal was always a delight, and my father always outdid himself balancing must-have traditions with new experiments, and I always did the mashed potatoes. No one can quite remember when I started doing them, but long after I moved out, my little brother would start calling me in the days before the holiday to make sure that I was still planning on doing them.

    But the real fun was always after the main meal. When the family left, that's when the friends would start pouring in. For my brothers and I, especially as we got older and friends started moving away to college or post-college careers, Thanksgiving was one of the few times when everyone would come back to town at the same time, and most of them celebrated earlier in the day than we did. So a second tradition was born, wherein friends new and old, some we'd see all the time, some we'd only see this one day a year, would pile in. We'd always put an old movie on the TV, the kind of thing you could pay attention to when you wanted to, but no one would be upset if you talked, because it was more about being together than watching TV -- the choice was usually a Sean Connery 007 because we had all seen them enough but also still enjoyed them enough that it just always worked. And then, my dad would go into the kitchen and start making turkey and gravy sandwiches on fresh rolls while the movie started, and at some point, trays or paper plates filled with sandwiches would start appearing.

    But nothing lasts forever, and for a multitude of reasons, that tradition came to an end several years ago. This year, I'm doing a small gathering, and I wanted to make turkey without doing a full bird - not enough space, not enough people, not enough interest in having turkey as many days in a row as making the full bird would entail. Last year, I hosted a similar small gathering and made turkey cutlets with a madiera wine reduction for the white meat, and empanadas stuffed with shredded leg meat and gravy for the dark meat, and that was a great success. But I didn't feel like doing empanadas two years in a row, and with my dad and my youngest brother both coming this year, I wanted to do something in addition to the turkey cutlets to pay tribute to those wonderful years we had at our old house. I also know that no one will be staying late enough for there to be midnight turkey sandwiches.

    Around 6am this morning, the brainstorm hit, and I ran off to the store hoping I wasn't too late. I snatched up some giant turkey drumsticks, some onions, leeks, herbs and stock, and rushed home. Seasoned the turkey, browned it in a dutch oven, removed it temporarily, browned the onions and leeks, added back the turkey, added stock and wine and herbs, and I let those monsters braise at a low simmer for 12 hours. I just tasted the meat and it's the most tender and flavorful turkey I've ever had - it's as if it radiates gravy from the inside. Shredded it, picked out all the bones, and put it in the fridge soaking in that wine and stock reduction. I also bought a bunch of slider buns, and this afternoon, as everyone arrives, I'll serve little dark meat turkey sliders while they wait on the main event. A nice throwback to years past an a slightly new way.

    And I'm definitely braising turkey legs again like this, because it's unbelievable - like I said, it's as if the gravy has been somehow beamed inside the meat, so that when you bite into it, it's a complete turkey-and-gravy mouthful in one tasting.
     
  6. Kevin Hewell

    Kevin Hewell Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2003
    Messages:
    2,468
    Likes Received:
    256
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Real Name:
    Kevin Hewell
    Wonderful story, Josh, and those turkey legs sound delicious.
     
    Jeff Flugel and Josh Steinberg like this.
  7. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 1997
    Messages:
    27,570
    Likes Received:
    4,837
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
    Real Name:
    Sam Posten
    Darth Cobbler success!
    82E85AAA-D73F-4785-AE6A-BCE67109289F.
     
    Josh Steinberg and DaveF like this.
  8. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    22,252
    Likes Received:
    3,711
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    Here’s most of my thanksgiving cooking, plus the ever-optimistic scavenger. Turkey was good, rolls were good reheated and slathered with butter. I also whipped up some buttermilk drop biscuits. Mashed potatoes were grainy, so not my best. And then derby pie and eggnog among other things for dessert. (Also not shown, a Moscow Mule a friend made me, much appreciated after a long morning of cooking. :) )
    F138FD06-1B8C-45EF-8A90-C10809BA3951. 7E812A59-6E6A-4D56-9017-ADECF3DD2172. 71C4CBE0-7A60-4B91-A1E3-AF70B8C90299. EF550A7E-F702-4171-89A2-FDB8E5D84E92. 0F147F08-9EF6-4B89-886F-26E5462352DB.
    CC27052E-5CCD-4885-842B-50EC5A6DA0D5. ADCEA02F-7904-4F54-AA06-920797A6DDB6. B7EF522B-4904-447C-AB4F-FABD400D0463.
     
  9. Johnny Angell

    Johnny Angell Played With Dinosaurs Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1998
    Messages:
    11,282
    Likes Received:
    3,561
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    Real Name:
    Johnny Angell
  10. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    22,252
    Likes Received:
    3,711
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    Anova Culinary Sous Vide Precision Cooker | WI-FI + Bluetooth | 900W | Anova App Included https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HHWSV1S/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apip_UqlzQWCwTr7Ei

    it’s the only one I’ve ever used so I can’t compare the relative benefit of a little more or little less power. I read the reviews and bought one that seemed good and am willing to spend a little more to help guarantee I’ll be happy with what I bought.
     
  11. Johnny Angell

    Johnny Angell Played With Dinosaurs Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1998
    Messages:
    11,282
    Likes Received:
    3,561
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    Real Name:
    Johnny Angell
    Amazon has a link on your model to a newer version which is the one I bought. $128 minus some Amazon bucks. I’m glad you’re still happy with yours. Looking forward to trying it out.
     
    DaveF likes this.
  12. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2001
    Messages:
    51,968
    Likes Received:
    14,514
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Rensselaer, NY
  13. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    5,930
    Likes Received:
    7,132
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    I like the sound of the parchment paper version. I don't know if my wife's tried that method or not (probably has - she tried several before settling on her current method).

    She currently gets aluminum foil (normally using heavy duty foil), accordion folds it, puts it in an edged (i.e. sheet cake) pan, lays the bacon across the folds, and bakes it at 400 degrees until it's done. She pours off the fat into a glass jar for later use. The bacon comes out almost perfectly flat and you can get it all crisp with no "raw" fat parts. I like my bacon crisp - all of it. If the fat isn't crisped I don't touch it. My grandson likes it about half cooked. She can do both easily with this method as she just takes his out early and puts the rest back in to finish cooking. When she does this she'll cook several packages and just puts them in the fridge or freezer for later use. It reheats very easily - either in a skillet, the oven, or, if you're in a hurry, the microwave (just takes a few seconds).

    This method works so well for her that I know I'd use it too. Less mess and easy clean up with the flat bacon I prefer, all without resorting to a press to get similar results in a skillet.

    We purchase *only* Wright Hickory Smoked bacon. We love the thicker slices and the way it cooks up. Excellent stuff.
     
  14. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    17,143
    Likes Received:
    20,640
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Josh Steinberg
    I find that there is no one perfect method of cooking bacon for me - sometimes I want crispier bacon and there are better ways for that, and sometimes I want chewier bacon and there are better ways for that.

    I don’t love the oven methods in practice because of my smaller kitchen - I hate to preheat and turn on the oven just to make one small thing when a stovetop will do, especially if I’m already using one burner. I’ve done the baked on parchment thing and it’s admittedly pretty good, but — then you’re preheating the oven for 10+ minutes and cooking for another 20. Meanwhile, I could make and prepare a batch of pancakes and bacon on the stove in half that time. It’s not necessarily great time management in my case.
     
  15. Johnny Angell

    Johnny Angell Played With Dinosaurs Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1998
    Messages:
    11,282
    Likes Received:
    3,561
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    Real Name:
    Johnny Angell
    What have you cooked with the Anova besides the obvious steak? Also, what happens when you’ve got two steaks, one to be rare and the other to be medium rare?
     
  16. Johnny Angell

    Johnny Angell Played With Dinosaurs Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1998
    Messages:
    11,282
    Likes Received:
    3,561
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    Real Name:
    Johnny Angell
    So I opened up the Anova and got it connected to my wifi. I looked at the recipe for a medium-rare rib-eye. It will take two hours. However, I see nothing in the menu to take into account the thickness of the steak. Won’t the thickness alter the required cooking time?
     
  17. Johnny Angell

    Johnny Angell Played With Dinosaurs Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1998
    Messages:
    11,282
    Likes Received:
    3,561
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    Real Name:
    Johnny Angell
    It occurs to me that the sous vide process is very like a reverse sear.
     
  18. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    22,252
    Likes Received:
    3,711
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    I don’t know what a reverse sear is. :)

    The instructions should say what the thickness of steak expected for the cook is. If not, google it. Or check the Anova forums. Sous vide is Sous vide, and there’s a lot of info and recipes online.
     
  19. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    17,143
    Likes Received:
    20,640
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Josh Steinberg
    I’ve never done it but a reverse sear is where you begin the steak in the oven to bring it to temperature, and then put it on a grill or hot pan at the very end to get that high heat cooking to make a crust. (As opposed to starting on the grill or pan and then finishing in the oven.)

    I generally do my steaks in a cast iron pan so it’s usually a one step process for me.
     
    DaveF likes this.
  20. RobertR

    RobertR Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 1998
    Messages:
    10,638
    Likes Received:
    998
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    I cook all my ribeye steaks using a reverse sear now. Comes out great.
     
    DaveF likes this.

Share This Page