Transfer of a Huge .avi File Between Computers

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Lawrence Lin, Dec 12, 2002.

  1. Lawrence Lin

    Lawrence Lin Auditioning

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    What is the best way to transfer a huge (~30g) .avi file from one computer (with CD_R but without DVD writer) to another (with DVD writer)? Can the .avi file be saved as a MPEG2 file and then written to CDs through CD_R while maintaing the MPEG2 quality, and then imported to another computer? The two computers are in two different locations. Is online transfer a viable option?
     
  2. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    If transporting it over a network isn't an option, I would probably use Ghost or Drive Image to make an image file directly onto CD-R. Mind you, 30gb is going use a lot of CD-Rs!.

    Is sending the hard drive through the mail an option?
     
  3. Jeff Peake

    Jeff Peake Supporting Actor

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  4. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    You could use an AVI splitting program, then re-assemble it on the other end. Not sure how well that would work having to split it so many times, but I've done it 2 or 3 times on the same file and it's worked well.
     
  5. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    If the eventual goal is DVD- I can't see any reason to leave it AVI. Just compress it to MPEG2 and see what you end up with. You might still need to break it up into multiple sections to get it on CD (using ghost for example)-- but it will likely take 1-2 instead of 1-2 dozen.

    -Vince
     
  6. Robt_Moore

    Robt_Moore Stunt Coordinator

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    How about physically taking the hard drive out, and putting it in the other, making the hard drive a slave of the second computer. Have done this before when I don't want to haul someone's system around.
     
  7. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    Before you send the AVI, make sure that the other computer has a matching codec. For example, if you used a capture card with a particular MJPEG (note the "J") implementation, you might need that same card in the other computer. If necessary, you can convert the AVI from whatever format it is to a non-proprietary one, like Huffyuv
    You can chunk the AVI and convert it at the same time with VirtualDub. It reads segmented files, so you don't have to reassemble them on the other end, just copy them over from the CD/DVD.
    If you're going to DVD, you could convert to MPEG2, but then you're locked into that particular conversion, and there are many variables (unless you're OK with recompressing). The conversion would have to be DVD-compliant. Is it constant bitrate or variable? Do you intend to put chapter stops; if so, you need the GOPs to start in the right place, with scene change detection and/or markers in your converter program. Stuff like that.
    //Ken
     
  8. Rob FM

    Rob FM Second Unit

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    Ken's got the right idea with "Vdub".

    I assume that these computers are too far apart (physically) to hook up a crossover cable? 2 nics, & 1 cable is a pretty cheap solution nowadays. I've used 100'+ cables rather than move the computers.

    Taking out the HD would be another quick fix.

    You *could* upload to a website (FTP) if you've got a FAST connection on BOTH ends.

    Let us know what you ended up doing!

    ~Rob
     
  9. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    You could get a USB2.0 external hard drive (or just the enclosure, and use one of your own spare hard drives). USB2.0 is backwards compatible with USB1.1.

    It will take forever to copy with USB1.1 (1 megabyte per second if you're lucky), but at least it would be portable, and be a lot faster than using the internet. It would be safer than taking out the hard drive and reinstalling it on the other machine.

    If you don't want to spend the $$$, you could try borrowing a laptop off of someone, and transfer it over the local network.

    Remember, never underestimate the bandwidth of a car going 50mph loaded with 120gb hard drives!
     

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