Should I buy an HDTV?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Josh Miller, Nov 6, 2001.

  1. Josh Miller

    Josh Miller Auditioning

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    Hello, I'm new to the hdtv stuff. I'm moving out and I want to get a new tv. I want to know weather I should buy a big screen tv, or go with an hdtv. I mostly watch dvd's and sports, and a couple of tv shows. Here are some of my questions:
    1)If it says the tv is hdtv ready, does that mean I have to buy the set top box and antenna to actually be able to watch shows in hdtv?
    2)When I watch a regular show that is not in widescreen what does the picture look like? Does it have the black bars on the side or does it stretch the picture, abd if it stretches the picture does it still look good?
    3)What are the best hdtv sets?
    4)When will all tv shows be in hdtv, and is a sure thing that they all will?
    5)Can I play video games on my hdtv?
    Thank you for helping me out.
     
  2. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    Josh: What did you expect and how valid did you think your answer would be???
    Regardless, I'll try to answer as best I can.
    1. You must own a TV, digital tuner, and input component signal in order to watch HDTV shows.
    2 Still, much better than regular SD TV.
    3. For me it was the Pioneer 643HD5 RPTVs
    4. No, nothing including HDTV is guaranteed!!!
    Good Luck!
    ------------------
    Take Care,
    merc
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    [​IMG]
    God Bless America!!!
     
  3. Mike I

    Mike I Supporting Actor

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    Most HD tv's have various stretch mode options for 4.3 programming to stretch 4.3 programming to fit a wide screen set or you can choose to watch 4.3 programming with black or gray bars....
    Right now there is a great deal of network programming in HD..All of CBS's and ABC's prime time shows are HD....HBO and Showtime have a HD channel..
    NBC has one primetime show in HD which is Crossing Jordon as well as the tonight show..
    Fox is totally useless when it comes to HD..They beleive that 480p is good enough...While this is still much better than NTSC, it is still does not come close to HD...
    You can play vidio games on HDTV's
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    [Edited last by Mike I on November 07, 2001 at 06:12 AM]
     
  4. JasonKrol

    JasonKrol Supporting Actor

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    yes
     
  5. John Tillman

    John Tillman Supporting Actor

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    "Should I buy..."
    You will buy one eventually. The VHF frequency will be sold to wireless appliance operators within the next five years. At that time the new system will be on the UHF frequency where 16:9 with 5.1 audio is the standard.
    Start by finding out what programming is available in your area and take it from there. If you live in the USA then you should at least have a satellite signal available.
     
  6. Stephen Tu

    Stephen Tu Screenwriter

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    1)Yes you need set-top box + antenna. Also a satellite dish (+set-top with satellite functionality) if you want HDTV from satellite as well.
    2)Standard shows can be displayed with either gray side bars (on most CRT projection sets), or stretched/cropped. The quality of the stretch modes varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. If you are watching the DTV broadcast from some stations, upconverted from their normal 4:3 feed, sometimes the station broadcasts 4:3 in a 16:9 window, with black side bars, which your set can no longer manipulate since from its point of view it is seeing a 16:9 picture already. Some stations broadcast these stretched into a compromise 14:9 frame or other weird distortions. (I wish they'd just broadcast 4:3 as 4:3).
    4)All shows "HDTV"? Never. There will always be a number of shows broadcast in "SDTV", lower resolution DTV formats. At some point in time, everything will be DTV of some sort, digital but not all high-def; analog broadcasts will cease. But it's almost certainly not going to be by the originally planned year 2006 cut-off date.
    5)Video games can be played (X-box will offer some games with HDTV resolution support), but on a CRT projector you should avoid leaving static images (score bars/lifebars/pause screens, etc.) on the screen for long periods of time, as you can get a ghost image "burned-in". This is not a concern on direct-views or on some of the newer display technologies like DLP.
     
  7. Richard Burzynski

    Richard Burzynski Second Unit

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    Josh:
    I am in the minority on this topic but I will give you my unpopular opinions anyway. I am a naysayer when it comes to buying an HD set today. I don't always recommend a 'no' but most of the time I do. In your case, I think you're a 'yes.'
    I'll give you my short version:
    Depends on your usage. You wrote, "I mostly watch dvd's and sports, and a couple of tv shows." Watching mainly DVDs is a great reason to buy an 16:9 HD set. Nothing will give you greater pleaseure when watching DVD's than on a HD set + good progressive DVD player. It is the ultimate. This is perfect type of set for your *primary* usage.
    Sports (4:3) on a 16:9 set is also OK, as the stretch modes are very hard to detect on this type of material.
    Regular TV on a 16:9 HD set. I think this stinks. I don't like short fatty characters on my TV. And I have seen the better stretch modes. The center is fine but when the character exits stage right, he/she puts on 25+ lbs. Annoying!
    Ease of use is another issue w/ 16:9 sets. Try teaching your sig. other how/when/what stretch modes to use & not use for what types of program material and you'll learn very quickly that you'll be the ONLY person that knows how to use the set correctly. Can be good or bad depending on how you look at it. [​IMG]
    Line doubler. If you will watch analog source material (DVD's not included) just realize your line doubler quality is greatly affected by the brand of TV you choose. Some are good - very good. Others stink. Can be very annoying, but not so much an issue if you're mainly watching DVDs any way.
    HD material. Program options are growing fast, just realize that separate tuner is $500-1000 and that rooftop antenna and/or satellite may be necessary. More money and complications (A/B/C switches) for other family members to contend with.
    HD Future. Likey that premiuim HD material will be encrpyted in near future and hardware is not backwards compatible - except for Mits who is promissing a hardware upgrade.
    Good luck w/ your decision.
    Rich B.
     
  8. PaulKH

    PaulKH Second Unit

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    Richard - complexity for significant other can be greatly reduced with a well programmed remote like a Pronto / Marantz.
    I have a Marantz RC5000 remote (almost identical to a Pronto), and on its 'home page' for example, there are BIG 'ON' and 'OFF' buttons. I've programmed the big ON button to turn on the receiver, TV, and VCR, set the receiver input mode to VCR and the TV input to the one from the receiver monitor out. The remote then jumps to the page of favorite channel logos, so after ON you just pick channels - cake. There's also a 'DVD' button on the channel line up which when pressed, tells the TV to switch to a component input connected to the DVD, switches the receiver to DVD audio input, and jumps to a page of DVD transport/other controls. Anyway, that's a sampling... but by programming buttons that do multiple things and carefully thinking out use cases (scenarios/sequences) the home theater operation can be pretty easy, but it does take work to create harmony in the household!
    How's that phrase go, if momma not happy ain't nobody happy? [​IMG]
     
  9. Richard Burzynski

    Richard Burzynski Second Unit

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    Paul:
    Personally, I couldn't agree more. A good remote makes HT much more fun because its EASIER to use. I jut got my first Pronto (actually Yamaha version) but haven't programmed it yet - but I am looking forward to it. This will be replacing my HT SL9000 which has served me greatly for the past 3 yrs. I can't imagine HT control without macros. I especially enjoy shutting off the lights just before we spin a DVD when guests are over.
    The Pronto/Marantz remotes are great solutions to dealing w complex setups. Only 2 things potential owners should know about these uber remotes. They cost $250+ and you need to learn to do some "mini programming." Some truly beneift from computer hookup and file downloads.
    From all the people I've helped w/ HT systems, I haven't been able to talk even ONE into getting a handy remote. They can't get over the price tags / or # of buttons. One friend in particular spent $2500 on total system but won't even spring $25 for the venerable great cheap remote, the One For All 7. These are people who just don't want to be bothered w/ this final step or who are not "good" at playing with these gadget-type items.
    As a result, I've stopped recommending them to friends & family. They just don't get it.
    Rich B.
     

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