need new reciever want true 5.1

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David Kyser, Apr 16, 2002.

  1. David Kyser

    David Kyser Agent

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    I have had an old pioneer reciever for several years (VSX4400) this thing has done well for me but it is just surround (no center or sub.) I have a good 4 ohm passive sub, a pair of nice infinity speakers (8" 8 ohm) and a pair of focal (6.5" 4 ohm.) I have been looking for over three years for a reciever that is capable of driving the above speakers + a center speaker. Anyway, I can't find anything in the retail stores in my area, most of the salepeople are uneducated in the products they carry. I have found that with many 5.1 recievers the .1 sub is just an rca out. I want to avoid a separate amp for my sub if possible.

    Any sugestions for a reciever that will drive 5 full range speakers and 1 sub high out (internal xover in the reciever) with mixed 4 and 8 ohm.

    thanks

    Dave
     
  2. Frank Zimkas

    Frank Zimkas Supporting Actor

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    Since your old Pioneer gave such great service I would suggest sticking with the same brand! Upgrading is great as long as your expectations are met. Stick with the Pioneer or better yet look at the Pioneer Elite models. Yea I've got one and I think its great, even though I had to buy a separate amp for my rear channels!
     
  3. Denward

    Denward Supporting Actor

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    David,

    Most, if not all, receivers require a separate amp for the sub. I believe that it has to do with the large amount of power that subs can require. If they built a second amp into the receiver box, it would be big, expensive, and the heat dissipation would be difficult.

    If having an amp and a receiver is aesthetically impossible, then you're stuck with getting a powered sub that has the amp built in.

    If cost is the issue, once you buy your new receiver, you can most likely use your old receiver as a dedicated amp for your sub.

    As for crossover in the receiver, I believe that any receiver with the Dolby Digital logo on it will have the appropriate bass management circuitry built in.

    As for product recommendations, how much do you want to spend? I'm not really up on the latest products but there are many HTFers who will be glad to help you spend your money.
     
  4. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    "True 5.1" is all in the decoding and has nothing to do with how the power is supplied.

     
  5. Richard_s

    Richard_s Second Unit

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    I too am replacing an older but great Pioneer VSX-602s. I am concidering the Denon 1602 since it has DD5.1, DTS and DPL II. What I don't know is how good the Bass management is.

    Anyone know how good the Bass management of this unit is the price is in the $350 range so David maybe this is a fit for your needs as well. The 1602 is 70w/channel and for $100 more one can get the 1802 and that gives you 80W/channel.

    From what it appears the 1602 subwoofer output does not set the crossover internally even if one sets the speakers to small but I may have read the manual at the store wrong. This is part of my question on the bass management of the 1602 beeing good or not.
     
  6. Paul Clarke

    Paul Clarke Supporting Actor

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    I believe the 1602 has a fixed 100Hz crossover. Many entry level and even some lower mid-level receivers have only this setting as well. I hear people bemoan the lack of choices but there is nothing wrong with a 100Hz crossover with the vast majority of speaker set-ups out there...of course, providing you're running 'Small'.

    [Edit]...after reading the manual online: it looks like the 1602 has an 80Hz crossover. My bad. But I still stick with my opinion on the 100Hz X-over.
     
  7. Mike Veroukis

    Mike Veroukis Second Unit

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    I believe Yamahas have a 90Hz fixed crossover. Sure choice is always good but I believe few would actually play with the cross over setting much anyway. 90Hz or 100Hz seems pretty standard so I wouldn't place too much weight on such a feature.

    I think a higher cross over is probably better when you're running satellite speakers, but bookshelves or towers would probably sound better with a lower setting. Just my opinion of course.

    - Mike
     

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