Hanging method for theater posters so they won't fall or rattle?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by JeffHayes, Jul 23, 2003.

  1. JeffHayes

    JeffHayes Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey guys,

    I am in the final stages of decorating my home theater and would like to start adding posters and plaques to the walls. The one thing I am concerned about is having the poster frame or plaques rattle or even fall off the walls during a particularly intense bass scene or audio track. Is there a preferred method of mounting these frames other than the "balanced on a screw or finishing nail head"? I thought maybe adding some small rubber feet to the four corners of the frame's back might help with vibration or rattle, but I'm not real sure of the most secure method to hang these things in the first place.

    Any thoughts?

    TIA,
    Jeff
     
  2. Nick P

    Nick P Second Unit

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    I use picture frame hanging hooks, one on each side of the top, and have never had one fall down. As for the rattling and vibration, I put foam insulation tape on the corners. Works very well in my setup.
     
  3. JeffHayes

    JeffHayes Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks, Nick. Basically heard something similar over at AVS as well. Two picture hanging nails on the top and perhaps those sticky rubber feet/dots you can get at Wal-Mart or Home Depot.

    Thanks again,
    Jeff
     
  4. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    If you want to be fancy, and have flat-hanging picture/poster/otherwise framed things, then there's the trick we use in the museum...

    Take a piece of wood; say a 1"x3". Put it on a table saw, with the blade tilted to 45-degrees. Slit the wood down its length - so your frame-long piece of 1"x3" is now 1"x1.5" with the beveled edge down the middle.

    Screw one piece to the wall, so that the angled face is pointed up, forming a "V" with the wall. Screw the other piece to the frame so that the point will fit into the "V."

    If the frame has a recessed section that you can fit the 1"x3" in, then you're set. If not, you will probably need a balance piece of 1" wood at the bottom to hold the frame parallel to the wall.

    Sounds like a lot of bother, but it works really well.. survives 6 million visitors/year; it can survive your sound system!

    Leo Kerr
    [email protected]
     
  5. MikeWh

    MikeWh Second Unit

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    Leo's solution is aka a "French cleat" and is very useful for hanging heavier things. They are most effective, when they can span the width of two studs (by screwing the cleat into each stud).

    I designed my large wall sconce and poster boxes with French cleats. Here is a picture I posted in another thread, showing how one might be used for hanging a fixed screen: http://home.earthlink.net/~sushinut/screenframe.gif

    It's a very old trick most commonly used by cabinet makers. Also, you can buy steel cleats that mimic this hanging system, if you prefer not to deal with the woodworking.
     

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