Audio decode delay from DVD

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Chris Borbas, Jan 17, 2002.

  1. Chris Borbas

    Chris Borbas Auditioning

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    Hi,

    I have a question regarding a nuisance in my home theater system. In my case, I am using a Onkyo TX-DS777 receiver, Onkyo DV-C601 DVD player and a Sony Wega 32FS17 TV.

    Here's how everything is connected:

    The DVD audio connection to my receiver is by optical link. The video connection is made to the receiver by composite video (I know... very bad), but also directly to the TV by component connection.

    I have followed all of the setup instructions provided by Onkyo for optimal audio performance. But to my dismay, there is a noticeable delay where there is video, but no audio coming out of the system.

    I sent a message to Onkyo regarding this and here is there reply:

    "With the optical connection you me have a slight delay. You could also run your standard AV connection for audio CD. This will not have this lag time."

    My problem is not with CD, but with DVD. Do I follow their advice? Do I switch to the coaxial audio output? Is this a common problem in home theater setup that I just have to deal with?

    Thanks for your help/advice!

    Chris
     
  2. Kris McLaughlin

    Kris McLaughlin Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Chris,

    Do you mean that when you start a movie, for example, that there is a few seconds before the audio kicks in? This is what I gathered from your post.

    If this is the case, it is likely that it is not a malfunction, instead this is simply the amount of time it takes for the receiver to recognize and begin decoding the Dolby Digital (or DTS, or whatever) signal.

    On my receiver (Sony STR-DE925), I know that it sometimes takes up to 3-5 seconds, and it can indeed be annoying.

    The worst is during those cool DTS or THX intro scenes, they are only like 10 seconds long so I lose half the audio.

    One workaround I have found is that as soon as the audio does begin, I can skip back to the beginning of the chapter and enjoy the audio right from the beginning, without having to wait again for it to kick in. This may or may not work for you, but I think it may be worth a try.

    Hope this helps,
     
  3. Chris Borbas

    Chris Borbas Auditioning

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    Kris,

    Thanks for the response. Yes, its that annoying delay for the decoding to begin. It sounds like this is normal, so I guess I'll just have to deal with it.

    If only the studios would put a few seconds of no sound so a recevier can decode before the movie begins...

    Chris
     
  4. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    I find it interesting that playing CDs doesn't result in any delay. On your receiver, is the digital format of that input set to "auto" (vs. PCM, DD, DTS, etc.)? I've run two digital cables from my DVD player... one for CD mode and one for DVD mode. For DVDs, I have it set to "auto" (on my receiver) and for CDs I have it set to "PCM" (CD's digital format). Using this method I don't notice any delay (regardless of source)...
     
  5. Jason_A

    Jason_A Stunt Coordinator

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    Yep My STR-DE925 does the same and its only DVD's. The studios need to have a short audio signal or ping before those logos to tell the receiver which to set.

    Yea otherwise just rewind to the begining of the logos to hear it.

    Very Annoying but hey early(or cheap) receivers do this.
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Actually, there is a current thread about some more expensive Pre/Pro systems that have the same issue with Optical. So it's not isolated to the lower-end of equipment.

    If you have the choice - go with coaxial.
     

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