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Troubleshooting subwoofer amp / receiver

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by dekayed, Feb 5, 2017.

  1. dekayed

    dekayed Auditioning

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    Alexander
    Hi, I have a subwoofer (Dayton Audio RSS315HFA-8) that is connected to a subwoofer amp (Dayton Audio SA230), which is connected to a receiver (Sony STRDG920). At some point a little while ago, I stopped getting any sound through the subwoofer (i.e. it had previously been working fine). I am trying to figure out the issue, but I am not really sure how to go about determine whether the issue is the amp or the receiver without needing access to an additional amp or receiver.

    I was able to hook up the subwoofer to another source, so I am confident that it is not the issue. Also, I confirmed that the receiver is set up for 'small' speakers and the crossover frequency is 80Hz.

    What other steps would you take to determine the problem? Is there some type of equipment that I could get that is relatively cheap that would help me diagnose things further?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Moderator

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    The quickest and easiest way would be to take the driver out of the cabinet (typically 8 screws, be carefully using a battery-powered drill not to have it slip and poke a hole in the cone) and then connect another one to see if you get any sound.

    If there is o other speaker available, then check for continuity across the terminals with an ohm meter. You should get a figure close to 8 or 4 (depending on if it’s an 8- or 4-ohm driver). If you get no digital readout, it means the voice coil is open and hence the driver is bad. You can get volt-ohm meters fairly cheaply. At a hardware store.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. ArmSC

    ArmSC Supporting Actor

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    1. What source did you use? What happened when you hooked it up? Did you get the sound out of the subwoofer? if you did then it seems to the AVR is not feeding it the low end. Sounds like a bad sub out on the AVR at this point.
    2. What happens if you put the sub output of the AVR into the line in input of the sub amp same thing or different? Have you switched subwoofer cables? Have you checked to make sure the sub channel in on in the AVR? Maybe it got turned off somehow.
    3. If the sub makes noise with another source then I think the driver is fine no need for a multi meter. If it doesn't then you could use one to check the driver like Wayne explained.
    If the other source didn't make the sub produce sound it could be the sub, amp or the signal from the AVR. Again if the second source made the sub work it's the AVR. If it's the AVR then it's either a setting stopping the sub out from working or it's a faulty connection in the AVR.
     
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt likes this.

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