The Carol Burnett Show - Complete Series on Shout Factory TV

RBailey

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Shout Factory TV and Amazon Prime has added episodes of THE TIM CONWAY SHOW, his two-season series for viewing. Also, Tim's very short lived series, ACE CRAWFORD, PRIVATE EYE is available as well (all 5 episodes).
 

Larry.P

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If I may ask, where do you get detailed info on which skits go to which?
There is a book published by Bear Manor Media called "The Carol Burnett Show Companion" by Wesley Hyatt. It has detailed info on a majority of the shows. Using that and recognizing which season and which guest star helps complete the picture. Also, Folk keeps going back and re-structuring the format. They initially showed four episodes over 2 hours (each 30 minutes w/ commercials). Now they are mostly showing 3 episodes over 2 hours. Sometimes an episode lasts almost a full hour (w/ commercials), and sometimes much shorter depending on how music- heavy the episode originally was. Most of the episodes that they originally showed as half-hours they have also shown in these extended versions which place all the skits together properly. Crazy enough, a few of the extended versions are missing things that were in the 1/2 hour version.
 
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RedPenguin

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There is a book published by Bear Manor Media called "The Carol Burnett Show Companion" by Wesley Hyatt. It has detailed info on a majority of the shows. Using that and recognizing which season and which guest star helps complete the picture. Also, Folk keeps going back and re-structuring the format. They initially showed four episodes over 2 hours (each 30 minutes w/ commercials). Now they are mostly showing 3 episodes over 2 hours. Sometimes an episode lasts almost a full hour (w/ commercials), and sometimes much shorter depending on how music- heavy the episode originally was. Most of the episodes that they originally showed as half-hours they have also shown in these extended versions which place all the skits together properly. Crazy enough, a few of the extended versions are missing things that were in the 1/2 hour version.
Thanks for the info!

I just wish they cut better before and after breaks.

On Carol but mostly Red Skelton, there many times isn't really a smooth transition to/from commercials so it's jerky during the transition and sometimes bits of audio are lost.

So far I've just been keeping both versions of the eps like a 22min and a 35min or longer.

The endings often are strange because Carol often will be dressed entirely different than any skit you seen for the sign-off but I guess from a musical number. The sign-offs are the worst for bad transitions after commercials.
 

Mark Y

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There is a book published by Bear Manor Media called "The Carol Burnett Show Companion" by Wesley Hyatt. It has detailed info on a majority of the shows. Using that and recognizing which season and which guest star helps complete the picture. Also, Folk keeps going back and re-structuring the format. They initially showed four episodes over 2 hours (each 30 minutes w/ commercials). Now they are mostly showing 3 episodes over 2 hours. Sometimes an episode lasts almost a full hour (w/ commercials), and sometimes much shorter depending on how music- heavy the episode originally was. Most of the episodes that they originally showed as half-hours they have also shown in these extended versions which place all the skits together properly. Crazy enough, a few of the extended versions are missing things that were in the 1/2 hour version.
This is certainly interesting. I am curious though -- in the case of episodes released on DVD by Time-Life, do these showings include any material cut from the DVD releases of the same episodes? Apparently they are showing episodes (or "versions of" episodes) which weren't released on DVD at all.
 

RedPenguin

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Well I don't have any clue what is going on with Carol Burnett's Show lol.....

First it was confusing enough that MeTV, Shout, and Folk TV don't always show the same skits in the same "episode".

Now Shout airs sometimes different episodes live than they even have online.

Tonight they had S11E07 and called it "The Family Show" and aired as expected The Family playing Password.

Yet their website S11E07, while also called "The Family Show", has absolutely no The Family skits and just regular ones.....

Can't we just get a 100% uncut release? This is getting confusing......
 
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JohnMor

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Well I don't have any clue what is going on with Carol Burnett's Show lol.....

First it was confusing enough that MeTV, Shout, and Folk TV don't always show the same skits in the same "episode".

Now Shout airs sometimes different episodes live than they even have online.

Tonight they had S11E07 and called it "The Family Show" and aired as expected The Family playing Password.

Yet their website S11E07, while also called "The Family Show", has absolutely no The Family skits and just regular ones.....

Can't we just get a 100% uncut release? This is getting confusing......
I can’t speak to the differing content, but I can tell you that a “Family Show” has nothing to do with the presence of any Family sketches. A “Family Show” was what Carol called the episodes that featured no guest stars, only Carol, Vicki and (in their respective seasons) Harvey, Tim, Lyle and Dick Van Dyke.
 

RedPenguin

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I can’t speak to the differing content, but I can tell you that a “Family Show” has nothing to do with the presence of any Family sketches. A “Family Show” was what Carol called the episodes that featured no guest stars, only Carol, Vicki and (in their respective seasons) Harvey, Tim, Lyle and Dick Van Dyke.

Wow, thanks for the clarification! I never actually knew that, and that makes so much more sense.

I'm hoping they re-air it again as I don't very often see the Van Dyke stuff of the show.
 

BobO'Link

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None at all. Too much music to be cleared.

Music rights holders (who are rarely the musicians making the music) appear to be an incredibly greedy lot, holding dozens of TV series hostage with excessive valuations placed on even the smallest snippets of music.
 

Ethan Riley

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None at all. Too much music to be cleared.

Music rights holders (who are rarely the musicians making the music) appear to be an incredibly greedy lot, holding dozens of TV series hostage with excessive valuations placed on even the smallest snippets of music.
Not really. Maybe it's just that the people who created this music want to be paid for it.
 

BobO'Link

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Not really. Maybe it's just that the people who created this music want to be paid for it.
Much of the time the creators of the music hold few, if any, of the licenses involved in music reproduction/performance. Even if they do own a portion they're likely paid little to nothing in royalties due to studio manipulation. Very few artists make money off of the songs they write with the majority of their money coming from playing live performances. Even then they may have to pay a publishing company for the right to perform their own songs.

If the people who actually created the music actually got the money for these licenses I'd not have a problem. The thing is, they rarely do. Look up Paul McCartney, Michael Jackson, and the Beatles catalog as a very good example of just where money is made and who really makes it (here's a hint - it's whoever owns the publishing rights).
 

Josh Steinberg

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It’s often the case with these type of music clearances that the publishers want more money for use of a single song than the entire release could reasonably be expected to make over the entire lifetime of the product.

These are the kind of sets that will sell in the hundreds to low thousands in terms of number of units sold, but the music publishers set asking prices as if it’s an Avengers or Star Wars disc. They also rarely take into account how physical media sales have declined in the last decade.

Its not that musicians shouldn’t be entitled to payment for their work, but what’s being asked often bears no relationship to what the reality of these sets and this market is. And as Howie pointed out, in many cases these rights are controlled by corporate entities that aren’t directly associated with the original artist and the original artist often doesn’t see any payment. On the other hand, when there have been cases where the artists do control the rights to the material, they’re often more willing to come to the table because it’s a real person who either has use for the income or is just happy to have the work they’ve done put back into circulation.
 
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BobO'Link

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Quite a lot of it could easily be written off as promotion. It's quite common for sales of a song/record to increase any time a classic song appears in a TV show, especially those which haven't received "air play" for some time.

I really wish artists controlled more of their own catalogs. If they did we'd see lots of things finally see release.
 

MartinP.

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I've made some posts here and there before with an example of what I think are the most petty or picky or absurd or whatever words you want to use, instances of music rights being the cause of frustration in one way or another, besides the obvious. Five examples:

1.) A few seconds of music coming over the radio in Jaws, probably not even something most would take specific note of, was excised from the film and replaced when it was first put on VHS, because an absurd amount of money was wanted for its use.

2.) In two separate episodes of The Addams Family, after Thing does something for Carolyn Jones, she briefly sings, "It's so nice to have a Thing around the house." Excised from DVD releases.

3.) Sam Mendes related once in a Q&A at a screening that in a scene being filmed in Jarhead, he had Jake Gyllenhaal improvise a spot where he started singing a song, which he told Jake to come up with. (Sorry, I don't recall the song at the moment.) When editing the film he decided he liked this scene a great deal and it would work in the film. Shortly after he was told that to use the song in the film would cost over $500,000. Jake was appalled. "I wish I'd picked something else. Who knew?" Mendes said they paid it (!) and commented, "Goes to show you where a lot of money goes in a lot of films and who makes it."

4.) I was following a baseball fan's videos on youtube that she'd post after attending games. One night she was talking to the camera while fireworks were on in the background, accompanied by music. Her video was taken down for reported copyright infringement. Until the music content was removed, she could not put the video back online.

5.) Warners started their Warner Music company when Tab Hunter recorded a song and started making money off it. Warners said he was under contract to them and couldn't do that. So at some point years later Warner music was sold off and became a separate entity, so that all that Warner Music in Warner movies and especially TV series, like 77 Sunset Strip and other detective shows ended up having to be separate (expensive) negotiations and are why those have never been released.

Maybe it's just that the people who created this music want to be paid for it.
If this is the case, then I don't understand why is music "separate" from all the other crafts it takes to make movies and TV? Alternatively, once music is paid for to be listened to in a movie or tv show, why does it have to keep being renegotiated for every other medium it might be heard in, or occasion it may be viewed?

So, knowing these issues, aren't movies and TV series made NOW with the idea that the music is part of the work and cannot be subjected to these issues in the future?
 

rmw650

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I'll be OK with a Carol Burnett Show DVD set featuring The Family and Mrs. Wiggins and other popular sketches from that show.
 

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