Receiver + Integrated amp?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by BrentCrick, Oct 9, 2002.

  1. BrentCrick

    BrentCrick Extra

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    Hi all! First post, but I've been hanging out here for a while, absorbing info & buying stuff like there's no tomorrow...

    My current setup is a Denon 1802, Axiom m22s, vp150, qs4s, & Adire Rava. I really like this for HT. However, I recently listened to and was very impressed by the musical performance of an NAD C 370 integrated amp.

    So now I'm thinking of getting the 370 and using it with my current mains+sub, but I also still want to use those for HT. My proposed solution would be to run the L+R pre-outs of the 1802 into a line-in pair on the 370. That would result in the following:

    DVD--->1802--->center+surrounds
    .........
    ..........
    ...CDP--->C370--->mains+sub

    (dots added to make diagram readable)

    My reason for the somewhat convoluted setup is so I can listen to music with the CDP+C370 only. Ideally, I'd just get another set of speakers, but space & cost make this less feasible. Another thought is to ditch HT and go strictly 2-channel, but I'm fond of surround & especially my vp150.

    Has anyone here done anything like this? Seems logical enough to me; please let me know what you think or if there are potential issues here that I've missed.

    Thanks,
    Brent
     
  2. RobertSchaez

    RobertSchaez Stunt Coordinator

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    Why not get a power amp instead? You shouldn't need the pre-amp section of an integrated if you are going to use the Denon as your pre-amp. I would think a power amp would be cheaper than an integrated.
    R
     
  3. BrentCrick

    BrentCrick Extra

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    I guess that's the logical solution, but I'm not sure about the Denon's abilities as a pre-amp. As I mentioned also, I'm also considering going strictly 2-channel or eventually breaking out a separate stereo rig. If I decide to do that, I don't want to force myself to spend another $600 (SRP) for the NAD pre-amp. The difference between the SRP of the C370 & C270 (equivalent power amp) is only $100, so the integrated route is a bit cheaper looking ahead.
     
  4. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    I have a setup similar to yours because I could no longer put up with the pre-amp of my denon 3802.

    On my integrated amp there is a button to change from separates to integrated. when in separates mode it is nothing more than a power amp and is feed by the 380s, when in integrated it is a pre-amp/amplifier.

    So when I'm listening to music I switch it to integrated and turn off the 3802. beautiful music abounds.
     
  5. BrentCrick

    BrentCrick Extra

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    That would be ideal, but I don't think the NAD has that feature. It has main-ins for use with a separate pre-amp, but in normal (integrated) use these are connected to one of the 370's two sets of pre-outs. I assume that using the main-ins for the 1802's pre-outs would disconnect the 370's pre-amp section from its power amp section. I may stop by my local hi-fi shop this afternoon to see what suggestions they have. Will update if so.
     
  6. Rob Rodier

    Rob Rodier Supporting Actor

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    Getting a 2ch amp might not be the best short term solution but it probably will be the best in the long term. Put up with the Denon until you can get a preamp with a ht bypass.

    In addition, upgrading down the road will be easier with seperate boxes. That is my 2 cents.

    -rob

    "...and I never slice!"
     
  7. BradJudy

    BradJudy Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't recall what the setup is like on the C370, but there might be a simple way to set it to a unity gain (possibly just a particular volume position). The trick is remembering to set it back once you switch to the Denon so you don't double amplify.
     
  8. Mike_Ch

    Mike_Ch Stunt Coordinator

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    Brent,

    Just my 2 cents, but I have heard a number of Denon receivers using the pre-outs (I have a 2801 myself btw) and in terms of stereo, they performed rather poorly. A bottom-of-the-line Rotel integrated stereo amp using its preouts handily bested the Denon 2802 preout section, and to my ears, made even more of a difference than using the analog outs of the Arcam 72T cdp compared to the internal dacs of the receiver. I decided not to go for an integrated amp, partly because I got a great deal on Rotel's previous flagship power amp, and because separates give you greater flexibility and performance. That said however, the Nad is a brilliant amp for the money and can be easily integrated with a receiver. Not sure if the Nad has 2 sets of preouts, but if not, you'll have to use the high-pass X-over of your sub. Use AVIA/VE/internal test tones to calibrate the integrated's volume control for HT and you're all set.

    Cheers,
    Mike
     
  9. Michael Roderiques

    Michael Roderiques Stunt Coordinator

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    Brent

    Depending on how your sub is set up, you may have an alternative that can work very well and is not expensive to do.

    I had sort of a situation like you in that two systems are located in the same space and shared the sub and speakers.

    Run a second set of speaker wires.

    All I did was at the speaker end, put a set of banana plug on each set of speaker wires, marker them as to what amp they connected to and when needed just switched the wires.
     
  10. BrentCrick

    BrentCrick Extra

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    Mike, the C370 has two sets of pre-outs, one of which is usually connected via a jumper to the main-ins of the amp section. These can be used to bypass the pre-amp for use with an external one. This would almost be perfect, except I'd wanna use the pre-amp still for CD listening.
    Regarding sub connection, I'm currently using the pre-outs on my receiver to feed the sub a full signal & using its crossover; receiver is set to no sub & mains=large. I'm using L+R ext. in for my CD player, so I should be getting a pretty clean signal to my amps. Maybe the signal to a power amp would still be pretty clean this way.

    Michael, that hadn't occurred to me. Switching out wires might get old, but it'd be an acceptable interim solution. I'm also thinking more about Rob's suggestion of getting a power amp for now with an eye to the future. My local shop has an Anthem PVA-2 and an out of production Marantz stereo amp (don't remember model #) that I'm planning to listen to shortly & compare with the NAD stuff. Course then I start to wonder about the electronics outrunning my speakers...

    I may just go with the 370 & see how it works out. If it doesn't, I can still get a 100% exchange credit for the next year.
     

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