mutiple speakers/crossover

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Howard Halligan, Dec 9, 2001.

  1. Howard Halligan

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    I would like to put identical midrange and tweeters in a custom cabinet above and below my TV monitor. The two woofers would be in the lower part of the cabnet. My question is: should I run these speakers in parallel off of one crossover (designed for one set of speakers) or use two crossovers and make the parallel conections at the receiver? Since parallel conections reduce the impedance - what would be the effects on crossover frequencies?
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Another option is to keep the bottom speaker just as it is with the same crossover. For the top speaker, construct the same crossover, but leave out the woofer portion of it (the midrange would have its highpass and lowpass filters, and the tweeter would have its highpass filter in place). Then, just hook up the top and bottom speakers in SERIES, not parallel.

    In series wiring entails just hooking up the receiver's positive to the bottom speaker's positive, hooking up the bottom speaker's negative to the positive of the top speaker, and then hooking up the negative of the top speaker to the receiver's negative.

    That would preserve the original crossover without having to re-invent the wheel, and the amp would not be overworked, but you won't gain any additional sensitivity/efficiency for this setup.

    But I have doubts on whether this setup would sound good (just my gut feeling).
     
  3. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Patrick is correct splitting the drivers is not a good idea, unless the upper speakers have strong output to 100Hz. Then the bottom is effectively functioning as a sub
     

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