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how should i split my CATV (1 Viewer)

hoamskilet

Grip
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
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Nate
Right now I've got my CATV line comming into my basement, going into a two way splitter. One way goes over to my computer for my cable modem and the other feed goes to this amp/splitter box (plugs into AC power) On a couple of my TV's I have these horizontal lines (not bad, just enough to be noticable) that are spaced about 12" apart that scroll up my screen. I did some isolating last night and figured out that I have the lines when the cable is plugged into the splitter box, but they go away if I have the line plugged right into the cable before the splitter box. I'm doin a bit of an overhaul on things anyway, so i wanna figure out how to do this right so I have best picture possible on my tv's. My modem and router are going to be moving into the utility closet where everything splits. So I plan on using a two way tap with one short feed going to the modem, and the other feed going to however the lines are splite to the rest of the tv's. I have six jacks that will be in use immediately and may add a 7th out in the garage later. What is the best way to split the signal up and retain picture quality? Should I have some kind of amp in the line between the two way tap and the splitter for the tv's? Any help/recommendations are appreciated.
 

Bob McElfresh

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 22, 1999
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5,182
Hi Nate.

Lines are often caused by reflections in the cable. This can be caused by a splitter with a 'open' output. Radio Shack sells "Resistor Caps" which you should use on any un-used outputs of your splitter.

Since your cable modem is on the other leg of your 2 way splitter - this wont help much. You may need to call a CATV service guy.

6 way splitter

This is tricky. Each split cuts the signal strength in half. You may need to invest in a "Distribution Amp" which amplifies and splits the signals. The better ones have some of the outputs for longer runs and other outputs for shorter ones. A company called "Channel Plus" used to make some great amps. I used a 6-way amp for my home. But be prepared to spend $120 on the unit.
 

hoamskilet

Grip
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
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19
Real Name
Nate
I had caps on unused ports when they weren't being used. I picked up a standard 8 way splitter and am going to get an amp to put inline before the splitter. I'm hopin that the amp/splitter unit that I'm currently using is just a cheap piece of crap and that's what's causing the trouble.
 

Patrick Sun

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jun 30, 1999
Messages
39,650
I will only offer that if you are going to feed one of those HD DVR/Cablebox from the cable company, don't feed it an amplified signal as it can interfere with the box's 2-way communication. That's what the cable guy told me when he came out to get me up and running (and I had a small 20dB amp inline with the feed going to the cablebox, and 3 analog boxes (1 VCR, 2 ReplayTVs). Can't remember if he replaced any of the splitters with gold plated ones that were rated for 1100 MHz (not the typical 900 MHz splitters you also find in the stores).
 

LewB

Screenwriter
Joined
Feb 11, 2002
Messages
1,282
Could the 'rolling line' be caused by a ground loop ?
Try getting one of those plugs that takes a 3 prong plug and has 2 prongs with a ground tab on the other side). Plug the amp into that and do not connect the ground tab to anything. If the bars go away, you have a ground loop (I think). That means that the ground of the cable system (coax) is at a different level than that of your house.
In any case, let the cable Co. figure out how to get you on the air. And do not rely on the lack of a ground to the amp to be the fix. Grounds are there for a reason.
 

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