different price points

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Steve_Drake, Feb 18, 2006.

  1. Steve_Drake

    Steve_Drake Stunt Coordinator

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    I work at a Sears, and lately there has been a large number of people interested in HDTV. What are the best buys for consumers at different price points? Lets say 1.5k, 2k, and then 3k+. I just want to provide good customer service and not just push the product of the month. Thanks.
     
  2. Steve_Drake

    Steve_Drake Stunt Coordinator

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    Update: to make it easier, we carry sony, samsung, toshiba and mitsu
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Steve.

    The problem is that televisions out-of-the-box are turned up into "torch mode" so they grab peoples attention. This does not provide the best detail.

    There are LOTS of different factors that can make one television a better-value than the others. This includes:
    • Number of input connectors (think of a HD cable box, Video game system, DVD player - all with component inputs)
    • Upscaling - The Samsung units tend to do a better job with the built-in Farajuda chip with ordinary CATV video. If a customer watches a lot of standard-video signals and does not plan to upgrade to HD for casual television watching, the Samsung is usually worth the few extra bucks.
    • Sony seems to be cranking out outstanding televisions by the gross. They seem to be cheep, reliable and solid units.
    • Remote - does the remote have separate buttons to jump to one input or the other? Or do you have to rotate through AntA->AntB->Video1->... with a toggle button? Being able to jump directly to a input makes the television a lot nicer to use, and to my mind - a better value.

    It is strange but you might want to assume that all HD Televisions will look identical once they are brought home, had the brightness turned down, and been calibrated with a setup disk like Avia or Video Essentials. (Assuming the same HD Video source). Look at all the other features except screen-beauty and you may find some stand-out models.

    PS: One suggestion Use this Viewing Distance Calculator to calculate the best viewing distance for a 40", 45, 50, 55 and 60" display. Carry this "cheet-sheet" and a tape-measure around with you. When someone is looking at a television - have them stand at the ideal THX viewing distance for that size television. While it may not impress your boss - it may help settle the husband-wife argument about what size television to buy.
     
  4. Jack Heckler

    Jack Heckler Extra

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    Bob...been in a Sears lately? At least at the one closest to our place, the HDTV's are packed into such a small area that you are hard pressed to get a good line of sight on any HDTV from a normal viewing distance![​IMG]

    Jack
     

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