componant synergy

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Red Spencer, Aug 22, 2002.

  1. Red Spencer

    Red Spencer Agent

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    I did post this elsewhere, but if you have some wisdom...
    What part does synergy play in the whole, when it comes to componants,cables, and speakers. I went to a really classy hi-fi retailer (the kind that don't try and sell you anything) and their perception was synergy plays a signifigant role in your total sound. And if this be true, then how do you know which manufactures synergize best with each other.
    If you know any proven combinations that synergize well, please list them [​IMG]
     
  2. Matt Jesty

    Matt Jesty Second Unit

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    Synergy ,imo, begins with matched speakers and then goes to finding a rcvr/amp(then pre-amp) that sounds good with them...that is as far as most people take it, but then you can demo differant source components with this set-up to find which are complimentary....then cables and interconnects......etc ad nauseum
     
  3. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

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    Red, component synergy is simply balancing out the sonic attributes of all your audio gear. For instance, you wouldn't necessarily want to run a bright CD player into a bright receiver that goes into bright speakers. The result would probably be too screechy for most of us. But, like all things audio (and video), synergy is a highly personal and subjective thing. Someone with extreme tinnitus might find the above example to sound great!

    As a personal example: I love the clarity and detail of my Norh 4.0 speakers, yet I find them a bit on the harsh and sterile side. My purchase of a Harmon/Kardon preamp, known for its warm presentation, softened the speakers up just to my liking - making the sonic presentation very smooth and liquid without sacrificing too much detail.
     
  4. Red Spencer

    Red Spencer Agent

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    Thanks guys...thought nobody wanted to respond[​IMG]
     
  5. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    would someone explain to me just what attributes of a decent middle of the road cd player or solid state amp make it bright or warm or tepid? just how would the signal be affected in order to achieve this?
    with respect to your question though Red, I would say its largely based on the individual coming to an understanding of what makes it for them insofar as speakers go and then expending the necessary effort to get them to behave in the room they're placed in. after that its simply choosing components with the appropriate features and capabilities to work with those speakers.
     
  6. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

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    Well Chu, your question is a bit more complicated. The main thing is the design of the component. All those little caps, resistors, and inductors work together - not just providing voltage and current sources for the next device, but boosting some frequencies and attenuating others. A certain circuit may be primarily designed to output a specific voltage or current to the next stage, but also may form a filter that affects the frequencies of the transmission. Many circuits are also designed for the express purpose of audibly altering the signal (again as in filters) to the designer's idea of what the component should sound like. I hope this helps, as it's a bit difficult to explain in Plain English!

    The materials that the devices are made of can also affect the sound. For instance, silver wire has a brighter tone than copper. If the component is point-to-point wired this example can come into play.
     
  7. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    well sure, if the amp or pre has been designed to alter the frequency response, but really, is that the mark of a well designed component or one that's been intentionally colored? regardless of how one achieves the signal that's output, a flat frequency response with inaudible distortion is simply that. the only thing silver has going for it is about 6% less resistivity which in and of itself doesn't mean a whole lot.
     
  8. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

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  9. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  10. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    I respect your experiences, but what does any of that have to do with your typical modern solid state amp/receiver? virtually all of them have flat requency responses and inaudible distortion levels. all i can say is that based on various level matched tests i've done over the years, i can't ascribe such characteristics. to me, people who've bought certain speakers and then look to 'correct' their sound have either bought the wrong speakers or haven't addressed room issues.
    I quite understand how some might intenionally seek out a coloration as a matter of preference however i've not seen it in onkyos, marantz, sony, bryston, yamahas and i'd imagine a host of other too such as odysseys, levinsons, etc.
     
  11. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    well saurav, are you talking solid state and if so then did you reconfirm the linearity? if not, who really knows what you did, yes?
     
  12. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  13. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  14. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    well that's cool! nahhhhhh...not directed towards you.
    i'll read the link Luis..thanks...btw, how do those tube hold up on nyc streets?
     
  15. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

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  16. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Well Tim, one day when you've got nothing else to do take the Yamaha and say a Marantz, level match them at the speaker terminals, and with someone else doing the switching and you not knowing which is being played, try and figure it out. What people perceive as differences suddenly become not so different when that's done. If anything, it's my opinion, that it be done once in a person's life as the lessons gleaned tend to give a refreshingly new perspective on components.
    I'm well aware that many people are of the opinion that mainstream, and even not so mainstream amps and receivers, speaking solid state, have a warmth to them. However this opinion has not been able to be verified under controlled testing conditions suggesting the perceived differences are based upon something other than sound. As far as the ear being able to detect differences, I'm a little unclear as to what you mean. The ear is decidedly non-linear with its ablility to discriminate between differences in levels. For example, in the range of say 1-4(5) kHz, the ability to detect a difference is about 1/4 of a dB. In the upper frequency ranges, a few dB are required. Keep in mind this is determined using test tones and headphones. The discriminatory differences need to be larger once we're dealing with music and are of course a function of the ambient noise in our homes. There are companies that will take a non-standard implementation of things and perhaps roll off a bit of the top end with perhaps a modest boost in the middle and yes in the areas of say CD players there is a difference. Everyone will interpret that difference in their own way...warm, engaging, call it what you will. Myself, I object on principal to someone f*cking with the frequency response curves and then charging me a premium for that. We've got equalizers and tone controls if we wish to contour the music to our tastes. That and effort, if one wishes to expend it, on our rooms and speaker positioning.
     
  17. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

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  18. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  19. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    i can see or is it hear your point Saurav of course even with odd order harmonics, there's a point, even if they were dominant, where they're inaudible. regarding speakers trained listeners have been used in work done in Canada where their comments regarding a speaker's performance have been found to correlate with measured frequency response curves. i posted the link once some time back. if interested i'll dig it up and repost it if anyone's interested.
     

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