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Press Release WHV Press Release: Max Fleischer's SUPERMAN 1941-1943 (Blu-ray) (1 Viewer)

Colin Jacobson

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HZW3KwK.gif
 

RICK BOND

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I noticed yesterday that the SD Max Fleischer Superman shorts I purchased last year on Prime Video have Upgraded to the New Clean versions ! :D All those specks, and dirt are Gone. :) Getting the Bluray from Amazon on Tuesday 5-16.
 

jbirdp

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My copy was waiting when I got home late tonight. After dinner I had time to view the first 11 titles and all 3 bonus features. I viewed the disc on a 4K projector & video processor combination.
My impression is based on just watching the films for their artistry and emotional power...not the techical process of getting these ancient and poorly preserved relics onto HD media.
From my perspective...they look gorgeous! A true joy to watch. The color and shadow work is true artistry and for the first time after a lifetime of seeing badly decayed variations, I felt the power and the landmark place of honor these shorts hold...not just the development of Superman, but SciFi in general. Clearly...even the design of Godzilla is inspired by one of these shorts! There are several more standard SciFi tripes that are equally obvious.
As for technical flaws, the most jarring are certain spliced on ending titles which include random music cues in conflict with the music concluding the final scenes.
I watched the new bonus featurette to pay particular attention to the extra clarity various reviews have described. All I can say is for whatever additional clarity (it's minimal) the price is a filthy looking image! During WWll, animation studios were forced to wash and reuse cels to save on the use of plastics. If ever there were examples of well worn cels creating a dirty looking image, this is it. True, all the filth, grain and negative damage is very clear, but if your reason for owning these films is to enjoy storytelling, artistry and a style likely to never be seen again...it's well worth the buy!
Now about the flimsy eco case...you will need to move everything over to something more befitting of such artistic wonders!
HALLELUJAH!!! A positive review! Everyone can now sleep well at night…

Thanks so much, Indy Guy! I’m with ya!
 

Nelson Au

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Guys, the YouTube AI suggested this Fleischer Superman 4K restoration video for me. It’s from 2 years ago and was sourced from the DVD for the upscale and clean up. Looks pretty good. I’ll should be getting the Blu ray today, so I’ll be able to see how the new blu ray looks.

 
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Stephen_J_H

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Guys, the YouTube AI suggested this Fleischer Superman 4K restoration video for me. It’s from 2 years ago and was sourced from the DVD for the upscale and clean up. Looks pretty good. I’ll should be getting the Blu ray today, so I’ll be able to see how the new blu ray looks.


Nope. Watching on a 24" monitor from a distance of ~ 1.5 screen widths, the artefacting is awful, the highlights are blown out, and it looks smeary.
 

Nelson Au

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Nope. Watching on a 24" monitor from a distance of ~ 1.5 screen widths, the artefacting is awful, the highlights are blown out, and it looks smeary.
I just took a look on a 50” display. There is some smearing that looks like it was from the grain. Not sure about the blow-outs from my viewing. I’m not an expert of these films. Agreed though it’s not great from a critical view point. From an initial viewing of it, I was looking at the artistry of the work that was done when they made these. I appreciate the original artwork created at the time for these films. I’m looking at the brush strokes and line work.

I don’t mean to sound contrarian, I’m curious about the film grain scrubbing that everyone is talking about. When Warner released The Flintstones on blu ray, I was very impressed with the image quality. To see the artwork so clearly is amazing. I could not really see a lot of film grain in those though. Perhaps it was due to a different film used in 1960 verse 1941. I could see some grain in the opening credits of the first season. But in the episodes, I felt like I was seeing each animation cell directly! So was the grain the result of the animation being made from the negatives or a duplicate of a print. I’d think the duplication from a print would introduce grain. But I’m just thinking out loud, I don’t know how animation of that era goes from artwork on a cell to film.
 

Stephen_J_H

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I just took a look on a 50” display. There is some smearing that looks like it was from the grain. Not sure about the blow-outs from my viewing. I’m not an expert of these films. Agreed though it’s not great from a critical view point. From an initial viewing of it, I was looking at the artistry of the work that was done when they made these. I appreciate the original artwork created at the time for these films. I’m looking at the brush strokes and line work.

I don’t mean to sound contrarian, I’m curious about the film grain scrubbing that everyone is talking about. When Warner released The Flintstones on blu ray, I was very impressed with the image quality. To see the artwork so clearly is amazing. I could not really see a lot of film grain in those though. Perhaps it was due to a different film used in 1960 verse 1941. I could see some grain in the opening credits of the first season. But in the episodes, I felt like I was seeing each animation cell directly! So was the grain the result of the animation being made from the negatives or a duplicate of a print. I’d think the duplication from a print would introduce grain. But I’m just thinking out loud, I don’t know how animation of that era goes from artwork on a cell to film.
It helps to look at this for comparison. Same era, same studio.
How they should look.

 

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