16:9 and 4:3 screen ?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by MarkRoberts, May 1, 2004.

  1. MarkRoberts

    MarkRoberts Stunt Coordinator

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    I am looking at getting mt first front projector. The main use will be for dvd. However I would want to use it for 4:3 material too. Instead of buying a motorized screen. Could two manual screens be placed in front of each other? That way I could just use the appropriate screen for what I am watching. The projector I am looking at is the panasonic PT-500U. It lists similar throw distance's for the size screens I would use.The projector has a manual zoom lens, which I'm guessing is going to be the problem.
     
  2. Jonty Rees

    Jonty Rees Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm just waiting on the arrival of a single, very large screen - 96x72". I don't see that projecting a 16:9 ratio image that is 96x54" on to a 72" tall screen is going to be a problem. If you're really hung up on not having blank screen at the top and bottom, (just like the black bars on a TV set), just don't pull it all the way out.
     
  3. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    You should use variable masking if you don't want the near-black bars. Using two screens, you'll have to refocus between them every time, which wouldn't be too bad with a digital, but you'd also have to pay for the extra cost of two different screens, which you'd probably have to have masked properly anyway. And not to mention the variety of AR that movies are in, not just two.

    I think variable masking is the best way to go.
     
  4. Ruben M

    Ruben M Extra

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    You said that you want the Panasonic?... I am not an expert so correct me if I'm wrong, but, i think that projector has a 16:9 native resolution, which means you can not just change from a, lets say 80" wide 4:3 to another of the same width 16:9 just like that. Unless the distance between the two screens are way apart or you may have a single screen but are able to move the projector back and forth depending on the shape of the projection that you want to enjoy at that moment. Usually, people that want to watch 4:3 material in a 16:9 display(including projectors) have to do it with black bars on the sides inside the 16:9 screen.
     
  5. MarkRoberts

    MarkRoberts Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the feedback. I know there are more than just two AR's. I don't mind the small black bars on the 2.35:1 and so on. I think the bars on the sides of the 4:3 will bug me.
    Refocusing is going to be the real problem I was wondering about that. According to panasonics specs. the throw distance for a 80" 4:3 screen is 9.8'-11.8'. For a 100" 16:9 the throw is 10.2'-12.1'. I thought there might be a place where I could get the best of both without the exspense of a electric masking screen. As for buying two screens I was planning on buying a da-lite electrol. So if this is doable I was going to get two manual pull down screens instead. It sounds like I would have refocus each time.
     
  6. mark alan

    mark alan Supporting Actor

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    The bars will be there whether you have a 4:3 or 16:9 screen. With the 4:3, they will just be projecting on the wall instead of the screen. If you have a white or light wall, it will be exactly like you have a 16:9 screen. You will want a dark wall or screening to avoid this.

    Build or buy a fixed 16:9 screen and make two masks from velvet (or other black fabric) and velcro them to the screen when you watch 4:3 material. problem solved, no zoom or focusing issues.
     

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