What's new

When are the Vintage Technicolor Movies Going To Be Released ? (1 Viewer)

Chris55

Agent
Joined
Nov 18, 2019
Messages
49
Real Name
chris
I'm sorry, but I don't think that's actually the case, Chris. Vagabond King (1956) was shot in VistaVision and all of the VV productions were shot using a single Eastmancolor negative and then processed in Technicolor (for standard vertical prints) via the dye transfer method. No VV production ever used a three-strip Technicolor camera for filming.
Thanks Will. Surprised at that, as the colour in "White Christmas" was stunning on the BD.
 

Chris55

Agent
Joined
Nov 18, 2019
Messages
49
Real Name
chris
As a "Technicolor enthusiast" myself, I'd love to see another UCLA two-color restoration, Follow Thru, see the light of day but I doubt that's going to happen. Who knows though? We waited nearly 40 years for the UCLA restoration of Becky Sharp to get a commercial release, but it finally happened.
Yes, I have seen "Follow Thru" in it's original Technicolor and it is wonderful, especially the outdoor scenes and, of course, the spectacular musical numbers. One wonders what they are keeping those Technicolor movies for, locked away in vaults.
 

Robert Harris

Archivist
Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 8, 1999
Messages
18,381
Real Name
Robert Harris
Yes, I have seen "Follow Thru" in it's original Technicolor and it is wonderful, especially the outdoor scenes and, of course, the spectacular musical numbers. One wonders what they are keeping those Technicolor movies for, locked away in vaults.
Possibly because of some underlying rights problem.
 

Drew Salzan

Second Unit
Joined
Apr 22, 2004
Messages
444
Yes, I have seen "Follow Thru" in it's original Technicolor and it is wonderful, especially the outdoor scenes and, of course, the spectacular musical numbers. One wonders what they are keeping those Technicolor movies for, locked away in vaults.
Yes! I saw it at the Film Forum in New York City about 10 years ago. It’s one of the few early two color Technicolor features that still survive with the original negative.
 

Rob_Ray

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2004
Messages
2,141
Location
Southern California
Real Name
Rob Ray
Yes! I saw it at the Film Forum in New York City about 10 years ago. It’s one of the few early two color Technicolor features that still survive with the original negative.
I remember seeing it at Cinecon in the early 90s and, later on, at UCLA's Melnitz Theatre. Both times there was a audible collective gasp from the audience at Nancy Carroll's introductory closeup, showing her large, expressive brown eyes and that luscious red hair.
 

Bartman

Supporting Actor
Joined
Aug 5, 2017
Messages
757
Real Name
Trevor Bartram
I believe the best you can hope for is consumer voting lottery of a list of titles deemed suitable by WAC or somesuch. Hopefully viewers at this site will make us aware of any lottery. My vote goes to:
Northwest Passage
Captain Horatio Hornblower
 

cinefan

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Messages
111
Real Name
Stephen
I remember seeing it at Cinecon in the early 90s and, later on, at UCLA's Melnitz Theatre. Both times there was a audible collective gasp from the audience at Nancy Carroll's introductory closeup, showing her large, expressive brown eyes and that luscious red hair.
I had to laugh at this because that first closeup literally took my breath away a little the first time I saw Follow Thru. I just saw it again at Capitolfest in Rome, NY a couple weeks ago. I remembered that first reaction (at an earlier Capitolfest screening I think?), so I braced myself for the closeup this time so I didn't get light-headed again :). I'm happy to report I remained conscious.

I would dearly love a nice disc of this, and of Northwest Passage that was just mentioned as well.
 

Jeff Heise

Grip
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
23
Real Name
Jeffry Heise
Correct me if I'm wrong (and I know Robert Harris will do it kindly) but, since a lot of early talkies are coming out of copyright over the next few years, will that ease getting some of these films onto home video? Say, in 2026, when FOLLOW THRU would become PD, could a company like Kino, Flicker Alley, Viavision or any of them go to the UCLA archive (which preserved it) and lease it from them for sale on the home video market? I can't imagine that the music rights would still be under copyright if the film is not, although I could be wrong. Granted, it would be catering to a niche of a niche market, but perhaps something along the line of Warner Archive's MOD program would make it possible. Just tossing it out there...
 

Robert Harris

Archivist
Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 8, 1999
Messages
18,381
Real Name
Robert Harris
Correct me if I'm wrong (and I know Robert Harris will do it kindly) but, since a lot of early talkies are coming out of copyright over the next few years, will that ease getting some of these films onto home video? Say, in 2026, when FOLLOW THRU would become PD, could a company like Kino, Flicker Alley, Viavision or any of them go to the UCLA archive (which preserved it) and lease it from them for sale on the home video market? I can't imagine that the music rights would still be under copyright if the film is not, although I could be wrong. Granted, it would be catering to a niche of a niche market, but perhaps something along the line of Warner Archive's MOD program would make it possible. Just tossing it out there...
Much of this is dependent upon the agreement under which the elements were deposited, which run independent of copyright.
 

GerardoHP

Supporting Actor
Joined
Jan 10, 2001
Messages
799
Location
Los Angeles, California
Real Name
Gerardo Paron
Universal has the rights for a number of 3-strip Paramount productions but they have done nothing to bring them back, much less bring them back in all their glory. Frenchman's Creek, Lady in the Dark and the DeMille color titles come to mind.
 

bujaki

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2012
Messages
7,128
Location
Richardson, TX
Real Name
Jose Ortiz-Marrero
Universal has the rights for a number of 3-strip Paramount productions but they have done nothing to bring them back, much less bring them back in all their glory. Frenchman's Creek, Lady in the Dark and the DeMille color titles come to mind.
The DCP of Frenchman's Creek exists. Restored by Paramount/Universal (?) and The Film Foundation. I've seen it and it's very beautiful.
 

Robert Harris

Archivist
Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 8, 1999
Messages
18,381
Real Name
Robert Harris
Universal has the rights for a number of 3-strip Paramount productions but they have done nothing to bring them back, much less bring them back in all their glory. Frenchman's Creek, Lady in the Dark and the DeMille color titles come to mind.
Where are you getting your information? It’s incorrect.
 

Robert Harris

Archivist
Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 8, 1999
Messages
18,381
Real Name
Robert Harris
There are only about 30 3-strip Tech Paramount films owned by Universal. Probably half of those would not sell numbers enough to break even.
 
Last edited:

Cleopatra

Grip
Joined
Sep 3, 2019
Messages
22
Real Name
Jean
Like others here, I'm afraid the market is just not there anymore for a proper release of vintage 2-strips technicolor movies... individual release that is.
On the other hand, a technicolor themed boxset featuring at least 2 or 3 movies would look more attractive to me.

It's in comprehensible to me that they actually released "Mysterious Island" onto DVD in b/w

I totally agree on this one though. A restored color print was screened more than 5 years ago, and I can't believe this is still only available in B & W and SD to this day. The restoration is done and the print available, so what's the issue here? What's the point of restoring a movie and not release it?
 

Cleopatra

Grip
Joined
Sep 3, 2019
Messages
22
Real Name
Jean
A projection of potential sales that would not be sufficient to recoup the additional expense of producing a disc, perhaps.
I don't think so. The most expensive step in (seriously) releasing old films on BD is the restoration. Once that's done, a limited release (like the Twilight Time or Imprint models), or better, on demand production doesn't cost that much, and is usually recouped by the sales.

I totally understand why pre-40's, obscure technicolor films are not released if they require a restoration (especially tedious and costly with Technicolor), but not releasing an already restored film is incomprehensible to me.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Sign up for our newsletter

and receive essential news, curated deals, and much more







You will only receive emails from us. We will never sell or distribute your email address to third party companies at any time.

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
356,982
Messages
5,127,708
Members
144,224
Latest member
OttoIsHere
Recent bookmarks
0
Top