What's The Difference Between RG6 and RG59?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chuck C, Feb 8, 2002.

  1. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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    advantages/disadvantages too???

    thanks
     
  2. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    RG6 has a thicker center conducter, 18% on average. It has less loss over longer runs and it a good choice for video distribution or for signals with greater bandwith like HD.
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    RG6 is much better suited for the microwave signals from a DSS/Dish system. And since it does a dandy job with the CATV signals (Radio Frequency), you may as well use it for everything. (It's usually the same price).
     
  4. Jeff Mills

    Jeff Mills Stunt Coordinator

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    I have recently been wondering about this myself.

    Could any of you recommend a place to get RG-6 as well as the connectors? Does brand/quality make a significant difference?
     
  5. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    The Canare stuff is easy to work with if you buy the tools. It can be purchased in places like www.markertek.com or www.haveinc.com. Canare's website is www.canare.com. There are lots of choices to get RG-6. You can look at Belden's website too, www.belden.com and get their stuff from various distributors. www.milestek.com also has stuff that they sell including tools and crimp-on connectors.
     
  6. Jeff Mills

    Jeff Mills Stunt Coordinator

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    Which cable would be recommended and why? Its to be used for DSS.
     
  7. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Radio Shack, Home Depot, etc., are all good sources for RG6 coax. And yes, you must use RG6 coax for DSS systems.
    While the Canare/Belden coax is great stuff, to use it takes about a $200 investment in strippers/tools to get good terminations. You really dont need that quality because:
    • The signals are all digital so they are much less sensitive to the cable than an analog signal.
    • Those signals have just traveled hundreds of miles through the atmosphere. That little bit of coax at the end is a small part of the path.
    But if you really want to go Canare/Belden, try www.markertek.com for the cable and connectors, and this web site for how to get the tools & terminate: http://www.bus.ucf.edu/cwhite/theater/theater.htm
    Click on the DIY link.
     
  8. Brian_C

    Brian_C Stunt Coordinator

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    RG6 uses an 18 gauge center conductor with a braided shield. RG6 also comes in a quad shield form to add additional shielding. DSS requires RG6 cable.

    RG59 is cheaper, thinner, and generally more flexible. But because RG6 carries a better signal, it's also probably worth the small extra cost for all around usage.
     
  9. Brian OK

    Brian OK Supporting Actor

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    Good Point Brian about mentioning the quad shield.

    During my HT room install, my contractor sliced my MIT quad shielded CATV cable (a rather expensive RF cable I bought on closeout from Audio Advisor). Oh well.

    Off to Radio Shack for a replacement --- got the "top of the line" RS RG6 quad shield and, ........ I'll be damned ... an excellently constructed cable which was better, IMO, than the MIT cable.

    Take a look at the best RG6 quad cable from RS. Does the job.

    BOK
     
  10. Peter Loan

    Peter Loan Second Unit

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    My friend just got his direct tv system installed. The installer just used his existing cable lines, which is RG59, rather than rerunning a new RG6 line. Is this a common occurence and should he demand a reinstall?
     
  11. Jeff Mills

    Jeff Mills Stunt Coordinator

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    I would assume that the quad shield would offer no benefit unless exposed to/run close to other cable and wires that would/could cause interference?????? So is it worth the extra couple of bucks for the quad shield?

    I generally am not a fan of RS wire products, but you guys are saying that their RG-6 is good stuff?
     
  12. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Peter: You should tell your friend to call the installation guy back and make him re-run RG6. (He is paid to do this by the company)

    (We are talking about the long run from the dish on the roof to the receiver. A short jumper of RG59 should be OK, but the bulk of the wire should be RG6 to handle the higher-frequencies used by satelite systems).
     
  13. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Peter: Another thing: Have the guy run 2 runs of RG6 into the house for a second receiver. He does not pay for the cable, it is given to him.

    Without this, if your friend tries to add a second receiver, he must pay for the additional cable & installation. The "Free" installation is only for new customers.
     
  14. Brian Schucher

    Brian Schucher Supporting Actor

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    You can make perfect termintaions on the Canare connectors wihtout using the Canare tools. You can spend less than 70 bucks for tools. Ideal Ind. stripper/crimper/dies
     
  15. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    Subject line:

     
  16. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Brian: you are correct that an experienced tech CAN put Canare connectors on with a sharp knife & a pair of pliers.

    But there IS some technical skill/craftsmanship to putting on connectors, and then there is the whole "experience" part.

    The specalized tools make it possible for inexperienced people (like me) to do a nearly perfect job.

    For example: The Canare coax-stripper is about $105. It creates a special 3-layer cut in the coax that you can do with ordinary hand tools. But you need to know the lengths involved. (Not on their web site last time I looked).

    The center-pin crimp and retaining ring crimp can also be done with pliers or a "hex" crimp tool, but I would strongly recommend buying the matched dies ($60) and the ratching crimp frame ($20). This way you cannot over or under crimp.

    I have that heavy "hex" crimp tool from Radio Shack for putting on "F" connectors. It works fine for some connectors, but I got a bunch of connectors with the attached crimp-ring from a electronics supply house, and the tool crushes/cracks the ring every time.

    So unless you are an experienced electronic tech, it's much safer to buy coax, connectors, and tools all from the same company so you are sure they are built to work together.
     
  17. Brian Schucher

    Brian Schucher Supporting Actor

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    IM sorry i wasnt more clear.. The Ideal Industries stripper will cut the exact amount of layers off the cable. You will need to adjust it though to be perfect. Its not difficult at all. Ideal also sells a crimp die that works perfectly on the Canare center pins. That die is sold seperatly ( i had to special order it at Lowes). That being said, The Ideal crimper which comes with the die for the crimp ring is about 30-40 bucks, the extra die is 20 and the stripper is around 10-20 i think.. It can be done perfectly with no experience. I for one had none and have made excellent cables.. Good luck folks. BTW, the Crimper is of the ratcheting type as well.
     

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