RG6 and RG59... What's the Difference?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Larry C, Jun 18, 2001.

  1. Larry C

    Larry C Stunt Coordinator

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    Could someone explain what is the difference between the two? Will it make a BIG difference in piture.
    Also does RG6 only have to be run from dish or does the inside connections have to be RG6 Ex. from VCR and TV Thanx
     
  2. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    RG6 has a larger center conductor. It has to carry up to 18 volts back to the LNB.
    RG6 is only required from the dish to the receiver. After that, use whatever you want.
    -Robert
     
  3. Tom Herman

    Tom Herman Auditioning

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    the primary functional difference between RG6 and RG59 is in frequency bandwidth.
    Satellite signals from a dish's LNB are up to approx 2 GHz, whereas ordinary cable and UHF/VHF broadcast is around 0.8 GHz maximum (UHF channel 69).
    RG59 will attenuate a satellite signal too much, and you might get too weak a signal at the satellite receiver, especially for longer cable lengths.
    For this reason, it is easier to use the higher frequency RG6 for everything. Belden's online catalog has a lot of info (probably more than you'll ever want !).
    Coax is also typically available with copper coated steel conductor (more common), or pure copper. Because the currents involved are so low, and because RF signals travel on the outer "skin" of the conductor, there is not much benefit to paying extra for 100% copper conductor. Copper coated Steel conductor will resist pulling better (installation)... if cable is stretched it will affect its frequency response.
    "Quad shielding" doesn't gain you much for these applications, the more common dual shielded already has 100% shield coverage for low interference.
    Two common, high quality cable types are:
    - Belden 1829A, 10dB loss per 100 feet @ 2GHz.
    - Belden 1694A, 8.6dB loss per 100 feet @ 2GHz, 10.7dB loss @ 3GHz.
    I was able to buy a 1000 ft roll of 1829A from Radio Shack mail order for 10c per foot. The 1694A is susbtantially more expensive.
     
  4. Craig Woodhall

    Craig Woodhall Supporting Actor

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    FYI, my brother was using rg59 connectors on rg6 cable and was intermittenly getting "searching for satellite, move dish 3 degrees". Once he changed over to rg6 connectors, the problem went away.
    Craig
     
  5. Tom Herman

    Tom Herman Auditioning

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    re the problem Craig posted about-
    the crimp connectors are definitely different sizes, because RG & RG59 are different dimensions.
    Another reason why it's easier to standardize on the RG6 -- fewer different connector types to mess with.
     

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