1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

What did you watch this week in classic TV on DVD(or Blu)?

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by Bryan^H, Aug 28, 2015.

  1. Message #2801 of 2954 Sep 23, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2019
    BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    5,634
    Likes Received:
    6,554
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    :rolling-smiley:

    Hmmm... The day I graduated HS (1973) I started growing a beard. It's been shaved off *once* since then with that one time being a shave it off that morning start growing it back that afternoon. I wonder if a younger me had that episode in the back of my mind when I made the decision I wanted a beard?

    RE: the mirage bit... I remember thinking it, and most of the show, was predictable when it originally aired. But I remember thinking that about *lots* of comedies. I watched 'em anyway because I love comedy and would usually get at least a chuckle off the "worst" comedy show. Most of my friends probably thought it was hilarious.

    The 10 year old me was all about watching a scantily clad hottie on TV. I could never understand why Tony kept Jeannie at arms length. Especially when she was literally throwing herself at him! I also never understood how Dr. Bellows was constantly fooled and if truly fooled why he allowed Tony to keep flying.

    I don't recall any stop motion effects in the show. I'd always thought effects were done with wires and other practical effect methods. I do recall the bottle rolling bits to be a bit wonky early on but don't recall them looking like stop motion. I need to pull my set (at least the BW S1 set isn't in storage as I've not yet finished it) and give it a look.

    Hagman is absolutely at his comedic best in this series. That was part of why it took me years to accept him as the "heavy" in Dallas. I saw Tony Nelson, *not* J.R. Ewing.
     
    Ron1973, Jeff Flugel and Rustifer like this.
  2. JohnHopper

    JohnHopper Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    2,452
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    John Hopper

    Yes, I do.
    She appeared once on The Wild Wild West as Belladonna, the assistant of Dr. Loveless, in “The Night of the Bogus Bandits".
    She also played in Clint Eastwood's 1973 western film High Plains Drifter.

     
    Jeff Flugel and Flashgear like this.
  3. VaporTrail

    VaporTrail Extra

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2019
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Real Name:
    Bill
    Thanks Jeff, glad to be here. There's some very entertaining posts in this thread!

    If memory serves, this appearance came up in the Neil Young biography Shakey as one of the reasons Neil left the band. He was in an anti-establishment phase at the time and loathed mainstream media. I think Stephen craved the limelight while Neil recoiled from it, hence why his appearance with CSN at Woodstock wasn't filmed.
     
    Jeff Flugel and Flashgear like this.
  4. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    5,634
    Likes Received:
    6,554
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    I don't think anything's changed in that avenue since those days.
     
    Jeff Flugel likes this.
  5. VaporTrail

    VaporTrail Extra

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2019
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Real Name:
    Bill
    He's now appeared in a few documentaries about his life, done some mainstream interviews and starred in a few concert films. I think he's softened to the media over the years and just wants to get his music and message out there. Just my opinion though...
     
    Jeff Flugel likes this.
  6. Message #2806 of 2954 Sep 25, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2019
    Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 1999
    Messages:
    1,475
    Likes Received:
    3,988
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Osaka, Japan
    Real Name:
    Jeff Flugel
    The Wild Wild West
    4.15 "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 1"
    4.16 "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 2"
    Randall's photo essay a while back inspired me to check out this, The Wild Wild West's only two-parter...and it's a good 'un. The extra length allows for a slightly more relaxed pace, with more breathing room for character bits and weird intrigue. This is one of those S4 eps where Ross Martin was recovering from his first heart attack, so Artemus is "on assignment" in Washington, and supporting actor extraordinaire William Schallert steps in as agent Frank Harper. Various public figures are committing acts of sabotage across the country, triggered by the appearance of a raven and the donning of red spectacles. West and Harper investigate, and uncover a cabal of villainous masterminds called Raven, led by a dome-headed genius called Tycho (Christopher Cary).

    This is a typically enjoyable romp, a double dose of double-crosses, captures and escapes, fisticuffs and horse chases through scenic terrain, sprinkled with some surreal touches, such as a trippy aerial attack of explosive pinatas and a psychedelic kinetoscope that hypnotizes both of our heroes at different points, Michele Carey provides the eye candy as a femme fatale who falls for West; the eclectic supporting cast also includes Jackie Coogan, Robert Ellenstein, Bernard Fox, Vic Perrin and Valentin de Vargas (who I remember chiefly as Luis from one of my all-time favorite movies, Hatari!) Schallert - who racked up an astonishing 386 acting credits in his 67 year career, including appearing twice before as different characters on TWWW - has a ball as the Artie replacement, getting to play a more heroic character than usual, and (in true Artemus fashion) dons several disguises, including a phlegmatic mayor, a Mexican ambassador targeted for assassination, and, most amusingly, a cantankerous German scientist.

    David Nixon's Magic Box
    - 1.1
    A real slice of British Sunday night variety show telly, circa 1970, hosted by the avuncular Mr. Nixon, a very talented man who's not only a smooth host, but also sings, cracks jokes and, of course, performs some quite impressive magic. This first episode features some good guests, including a very skillful ventriloquist, a decent impressionist / comedian (who does various impressions of the main cast of The High Chaparral, of all things), and a German magician doing a number of mystifying illusions...alas, the 40-minute episode is padded out by a couple of forgettable songs performed by regular Anita Harris. She's an attractive lady with a decent voice, and is a good sport when she's roped into the climactic big magic set piece...but personally, I'd rather have fewer ersatz pop renditions and...well, more David Nixon! In the main, though, I enjoyed viewing this old-fashioned light entertainment show, a charming relic of a bygone age.

    [​IMG]


    Poirot - 1.4 "Four and Twenty Blackbirds"
    This is not one of Dame Agatha's more complex mysteries; the suspect pool is pretty small (Poirot himself even comments on this at one point), and any veteran TV watcher worth his or her salt will figure out the killer straight away. But it's still a very enjoyable hour, with all the lush period detail, sets, costumes, props and atmosphere on display...not to mention the fine acting by all involved. There's a fun running gag of Hastings being constantly distracted by the Test Match results, with a nice payoff at the denouement, as Poirot shows that there is very little, even cricket, in which he doesn't have expert knowledge. David Suchet's take on Poirot is a decidedly comedic one compared to the literary version, but these earlier episodes are in many other ways the definitive versions of Christie's short stories.

    Sea Hunt - 4.14 "Expedition"
    Been quite a while since I've last dug into my 64-episode "Best of..." set. This was a good little noir-tinged episode, as Mike Nelson (rugged Lloyd Bridges) is asked by his old college professor (Robert L. Simon) to verify whether his team has actually found Blackbeard's treasure in an underwater cave off the Carolina coast. Mike soon smells a rat when he meets his old prof's minx of a research assistant (Lizabeth Hush), who's definitely up to no good. These S4 episodes look sharp; sure wish TGG Direct would release more classic shows on DVD, but I can't fault the stuff they did put out, like this, Bat Masterson, Highway Patrol and the like.

    Danger Man - 1.20 "The Vacation"
    Fabulous, fast-paced episode of this early ITC spy series, nicely directed by star Patrick McGoohan. John Drake boards an airplane to Nice with plans to take a well-deserved vacation. But when he recognizes the man sitting next to him as a hit man with an international reputation, he can't help getting involved, knocking out the man in his hotel room and taking his place at the villa of a rich industrialist (Esmond Knight) and his trust-fund niece (Jacqueline Ellis). It's a gas watching the ever-resourceful Drake try to puzzle out what's going on, who his cover is supposed to be, and ultimately, who the target is...and McGoohan is always an electric screen presence.

    Magnum P.I.
    - 1.16 "The Black Orchid"
    The bored fruit loop of a wife (Judith Chapman) of one of the islands' richest men (John Ireland) hires Magnum to take part in her elaborate Philip Marlowe-esque fantasy games. Things soon take a deadly serious turn when the woman's life becomes threatened for real. A fairly unique plot makes this one a good 45 minutes spent on the sofa. Kathryn Leigh Scott (of Dark Shadows fame) co-stars, as the woman's seemingly protective sister. While I would love to get my hands on the Region B Complete Series Blu-Ray set, it's just too damn expensive. Luckily, the DVDs look just fine.

    vlcsnap-2019-09-25-17h13m57s210.

    vlcsnap-2019-09-25-17h14m15s149.

    vlcsnap-2019-09-25-17h16m37s35.
     
    Rustifer, Montytc, JohnHopper and 5 others like this.
  7. mark-edk

    mark-edk Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2002
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    337
    Trophy Points:
    110
    I'm just wrapping up Season 3 of Perry Mason from my Walmart Season 1-3 box (I have yet to find the other two boxes in US format though I've heard they do exist). What I noticed was a familiar name in the end credits: George E Stone. He's known to me for playing 'The Runt' opposite Chester Morris as Boston Blackie. On Perry Mason he's the Court Clerk. In looking for more info on how he came to get this role, I found all sorts of misinformation. A site devoted to the Perry Mason TV Show Book claims he never spoke a word (clearly he did in some episodes, to read the text of an exhibit or swear someone in). Several sources claim he was the Bailiff (not the same as the clerk). Interestingly he is listed in the closing credits even in episodes where he didn't have any lines and just sat way off in the background. One source said that when Raymond Burr heard Stone had fallen ill (failing eyesight) and could use some work, he arranged to get him the role of court clerk. A classy move worthy of Perry Mason himself.
     
    Jeff Flugel, Flashgear, Mysto and 2 others like this.
  8. bmasters9

    bmasters9 Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    3,561
    Likes Received:
    3,359
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Real Name:
    Ben Masters
    Why is George E. Stone (as the court clerk) mentioned in the credits, even when he had no lines?
     
    Jeff Flugel likes this.
  9. Message #2809 of 2954 Sep 26, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2019
    Mysto

    Mysto Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2018
    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    2,121
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    marv long
    We had a piece on this in the Mystery Series of the 30's and 40's thread. Mr. Stone, in fact, was legally blind toward the end of his life and the Perry Mason show "took care" of him. It has been reported that they had to escort him around the set. Classy indeed for Raymond Burr and the staff of the Perry Mason show.
     
  10. Message #2810 of 2954 Sep 26, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2019
    JohnHopper

    JohnHopper Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    2,452
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    John Hopper

    I'm glad you finally watched it. It's amongst the best episodes of all seasons and a very ambitious one.
    It's very dark and gloomy. It has a strong Jules Verne-esque leaning with mad subversives dreaming of
    the perfect society dominated by science: see the delusion of grandeur speech of Professor Thaddeus Toombs.

    "Raven, Mr. West, is an organization composed of scientists like myself, men possessed of learning and talents undreamed of by … lesser mortals, shall we say? Men dedicated to freeing the world from the ignorant masses and their vain and smalll-minded leaders. We shall, when we come to power, rule the earth and its inhabitants scientifically."

    As in another master of the world episode entitled "The Night of the Brain", leader Tycho triggers the burning of
    the map of the US territory to explain his Armaggedon master plan to Jim.
    Tycho is the equivalent of Gwyllm Griffith from The Outer Limits episode "The Sixth Finger".
    It's the arch conspiracy entry. As in most Dr. Loveless' episodes, the foe escapes from our heroes.

    I like the love interaction between Jim and Laurette who compares herself to Carlota, the wife of Emperor Maximilian.
    Jim plays the part of the turncoat as in the season 2 “The Night of the Skulls", another conspiracy one.
    Frank Harper-wise, I like his calling card: the ace of spade.
    One scene I find odd is Frank Harper disguised as the duplicate of ambassador Ramirez facing the real ambassador Ramirez: very Mission: Impossible-esque.

    The emblematic animal of the raven is a veiled reference to Edgar Allan Poe's work per se.
    Do you enjoy the charade of the Lazslo Spectrum done on Jim's hand?
    Notice the distorted and psychedelic and atmospheric music score written by composer Robert Prince that highlights the strangeness of the plot, especially the organ use.


    The-raven.
     
  11. Message #2811 of 2954 Sep 27, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2019
    JohnHopper

    JohnHopper Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    2,452
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    John Hopper
    The delusion of grandeur speech of Professor Thaddeus Toombs
    "Raven, Mr. West, is an organization composed of scientists like myself, men possessed of learning and talents undreamed of by … lesser mortals, shall we say? Men dedicated to freeing the world from the ignorant masses and their vain and smalll-minded leaders. We shall, when we come to power, rule the earth and its inhabitants scientifically."


    The Agents of The Raven.

    Colonel Chaveros • Laurette
    Dr. Occularis I • Dr. Occularis II
    Thaddeus Toombs • Tycho

    winged-terror.
     
  12. Ron1973

    Ron1973 Beverly Hillbilles nut extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2012
    Messages:
    2,410
    Likes Received:
    2,429
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    Real Name:
    Ron Reagan (not that one!)
    Nah, I haven't disappeared! I've been running crazy like a chicken with its head cut off-appointment with a neurosurgeon yesterday, my mother goes in for a heart cath next week, car at the shop, a busted water pipe underneath the house-you get the idea!

    I have gotten in some classic TV viewing. I finished up with Jed and all his kin on DVD and am impatiently awaiting CBS to do their thing with S6. I have some unedited episodes of S6 and was watching some of the England episodes. Paul Lynde as a passport office official who thinks he's on Candid Camera is beyond hilarious! "Tell me, Sir Jethro, is this a rib?" (he's tapping his nose with a pencil as he asks) "No, sir, that's a nose!" We also get an appearance from Batman's butler, Alan Napier, as a British drug store owner. Granny gets her moonshine impounded by customs. "Madam, you should have emptied this jug before you boarded the plane." "If I'd've emptied that jug, I wouldn't have needed no plane!" :laugh::laugh::laugh:

    I've generally been watching one DVD of The Phil Silvers Show nightly. I wish one of the retro channels would pick it up or CBS would do with it what they do with Andy and Lucy-colorize an episode or two and air them at Christmas time. I know people will disagree, but I find Phil funnier than I Love Lucy, a show that has had better staying power. Don't get me wrong, ILL is cute, but Lucy is a one trick pony. She gets into trouble and has to be rescued from her hair brained schemes. Phil had more popularity in England than America for some reason. I'm friends on Facebook with a couple of guys who started an appreciation society and one of them now has a souvenir shop in England dedicated to Phil. I'm also friends on Facebook with Phil's daughter, Cathy, who herself has a comedic legacy from Happy Days. Very sweet and down to earth lady.

    When I'm done with my DVD viewing for the night, I jump on YouTube and watch Dragnet. I'm having trouble deciding which incarnation I like better-the 50's or the 60's. Both have their merits, but I think the 50's version was a bit grittier. I guess it's like trying to choose between chocolate cake and chocolate ice cream-you have to appreciate both of them! I stumbled across a Jack Benny clip yesterday where Jack Webb and Harry Morgan "interrogate" him after a guy runs across the stage, stealing a ladies purse. At the end of the clip, Morgan asks Benny for his autograph. Jack Benny gladly obliges. Harry Morgan gets the autograph and then tells Jack Benny that he's despicable!:rolling-smiley::rolling-smiley::rolling-smiley::rolling-smiley::rolling-smiley:
     
    Bryan^H, Purple Wig, Mysto and 5 others like this.
  13. Montytc

    Montytc Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    267
    Likes Received:
    258
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Real Name:
    Tim Montavon
    Bob Newhart Show - Season 2
    Episode 1: Last TV Show
    Episode 2: Motel
    Episode 3: Backlash
    Episode 4: Somebody Down Here Likes Me

    Solid episodes with the first one being my favorite. In that one Bob, against his better judgement (which he seems to ignore a lot) allows a session with his therapy group to be shown on local access TV. There is usually plenty of give and take during the sessions but when the cameras roll Bob is unable to draw a single word out of anybody and of course the results are a complete disaster.

    High Chaparral -Season 1
    Episode 26: The Hair Hunter

    This one tackles some social issues involving treatment of Indians back in the day. A business man in town is offering a bounty for Indian scalps and people are out hunting them like wild dogs. Some of that hunting is taking place on High Chaparral land and Big John is not pleased. James Gregory, who is another one of those actors who seems to have appeared in almost every show ever made, plays the heavy in this one. He redeems himself in the end after having a falling out with his son who is not on board with hunting Indians like animals.

    Ben Casey - Season 1
    Episode 1: To the Pure

    This is a series that I was not really familiar with, but I recently picked up that twenty episode set that floats around just out of curiosity. This first episode mostly just establishes the characters, with Casey being the anti - establishment doctor fighting the system. It feels mostly like formula stuff, but I have to consider the fact that it was the first show set in the hospital world and so all the others copied this one. Sam Jaffe plays the older wiser doctor who tries to keep Casey from getting thrown out of the hospital before he even gets started, and he lightens things up a little. I don't think this will become a favorite of mine, but it will make its way into the rotation now and then
     
  14. mark-edk

    mark-edk Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2002
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    337
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Follow-up to previous comments about Perry Mason. I'm always interested in the music scoring, and PM used a lot of great Bernard Herrmann cues, most written for other shows, radio productions, etc (he was affiliated with CBS for many years). Few of the Mason episodes I've seen had original scores, but one with an Oriental subject matter did: music was by Jerry Goldsmith and was very effective; parts of it would be re-used in subsequent PM episodes.

    'The Case of the Slandered Submarine' is an interesting case. After the credits the first scene began by playing the main theme of an entirely different tv show. A few years earlier CBS produced 'Navy Log', with a stirring main theme by Fred Steiner. They used that theme at several points in this PM episode (which was also well stocked with some fine character actors).
     
    Mysto, Jeff Flugel, Montytc and 2 others like this.
  15. Message #2815 of 2954 Sep 27, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2019
    JohnHopper

    JohnHopper Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    2,452
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    John Hopper


    More comments about your review
    Actor William Schallert previously appears twice on the series: “The Night of the Bubbling Death” (season 3) as a two-timer and corrupted official of the State and “The Night of the Gruesome Games” (season 4) as a very old and senile eccentric billionaire.
    I adore Schallert disguised as Wolfgang Kralle fastly playing the piano in the cantina.

    Actor Ross Martin was so sick that not only there were replacement actors (Charles Aidman, William Schallert, Alan Hale from Gilligan's Island) but also two solo episodes (“The Night of the Bleak Island” and “The Night of the Tycoons”) with Jim meeting odd lame ducks.
    I associate actor Valentin de Vargas with his part on Orson Welles’ Touch of Evil. Vargas also appears many times on Mission: Impossible.


    winged.
     
  16. Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 1999
    Messages:
    1,475
    Likes Received:
    3,988
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Osaka, Japan
    Real Name:
    Jeff Flugel
    Thanks for the comments and added info about "The Night of the Winged Terror," John! I really got a kick out of the episode. Even though I love Ross Martin as Artemus Gordon, and am sorry for the health problems which caused his absence from several S4 episodes, I do enjoy getting to see Jim West interact with some other guest agents, like William Schallert. And one of those "Jim solo" episodes you mention, "TNOT Bleak Island," is one of my favorites of the entire series.
     
  17. JohnHopper

    JohnHopper Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    2,452
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    John Hopper
    The solo episodes with Jim meeting odd lame ducks.
    “The Night of the Bleak Island” with mad detective Sir Nigel Scott (actor John Williams—not the composer: pun intended)
    “The Night of the Tycoons” with wealthy and green young man Lionel Bronston (actor Steve Carlson).
    The best of the two is of course the gothic-oriented "Bleak Island" and belong to my top 15 for that strange season.
    "Tycoons" is a minor one with good moments.

    TOP 15 SEASON 4
    1. Big Blackmail
    2. Doomsday Formula
    3. Sedgewick Curse
    4. Kraken
    5. Fugitives
    6. Fire and Brimstone
    7. Camera
    8. Avaricious Actuary
    9. Miguelitoʼs Revenge
    10. Winged Terror, Part I
    11. Winged Terror, Part II
    12. Janus
    13. Pistoleros
    14. Diva
    15. Bleak Island
     
    Flashgear and Peter M Fitzgerald like this.
  18. Message #2818 of 2954 Sep 28, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2019
    Peter M Fitzgerald

    Peter M Fitzgerald Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 1999
    Messages:
    2,061
    Likes Received:
    1,070
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    Peter Fitzgerald
    You know, pretty much any '60s spy/adventure show could (and usually did) occasionally have a chrome-domed genius megalomaniac as that week's heavy (paging Theodore Marcuse)... what set The Wild Wild West apart is that it often took that additional bizarre step that the others wouldn't. Case in point: in "Night of the Winged Terror, Parts 1 & 2", when Christopher Cary as 'Tycho' casually mentions to Jim West that, "Chronologically, I'm only 14 years old". :emoji_astonished:
     
    Flashgear likes this.
  19. Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 1999
    Messages:
    1,475
    Likes Received:
    3,988
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Osaka, Japan
    Real Name:
    Jeff Flugel
    Forgot about that odd point...and would it have killed them to match the skin tone of Cary's huge dome head appliance to better match his face?

    [​IMG]

    Otherwise, a very enjoyable double-barrelled episode of The Wild Wild West.
     
    Mysto, Flashgear and JohnHopper like this.
  20. JohnHopper

    JohnHopper Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    2,452
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    John Hopper
    MORE ABOUT THE NIGHT OF THE WINGED TERROR

    Weirdness (the carrying raven, Frank Harper shooting his own image in the mirror, the breaking of Tycho’s protective glass wall)
     
    Jeff Flugel likes this.

Share This Page