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The Great HTF Music Challenge (1 Viewer)

JohnRice

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(Thinking about this more).

In a genre like heavy metal, it seems like a lot of the "lighter" stuff sounds like generic pop music with the guitars really cranked up and sounding really distorted + layered in the studio, along with the overall low end bass cranked up very unnaturally. For example, stuff like Def Leppard, Whitesnake, and especially "power ballads" type songs.



Whitesnake - Bad Boys





Def Leppard - Billys Got A Gun





For some "heavier" stuff, this style of production just makes everything sound like a "muddy" slickness. For example, a lot of metallica records sound like that. An annoying "heaviness" which seems excessive at times.

Fundamentally, that's just what makes Metal a lot of the time. Either a really fast tempo, like the Whitesnake, or a really heavy, slow beat with power chords and lots of distortion, like the Def Leppard.
 

John Dirk

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Jonzen Crew - Space Is The Place

I've mentioned anxiety before, and for most of my life it truly has often been destructive. So I think the type of stimulation the ones who enjoy this music get from it is something I really don't need or enjoy. I don't like roller coasters either and there is actual research that the people who do tend to have underactive neurological systems, so they are thrill seekers in order to compensate. Those who have overactive neurological systems can't stand those thrill seeking things, because they're already on neurological overload. That would be me.

Was this thread about music?
I have this for thrills.
FJR.JPG
 

jcroy

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I've mentioned anxiety before, and for most of my life it truly has often been destructive. So I think the type of stimulation the ones who enjoy this music get from it is something I really don't need or enjoy. I don't like roller coasters either and there is actual research that the people who do tend to have underactive neurological systems, so they are thrill seekers in order to compensate. Those who have overactive neurological systems can't stand those thrill seeking things, because they're already on neurological overload. That would be me.

Was this thread about music?

(At the risk of going offtopic).

I was somewhat of a thrill seeker when I was younger. As I got older, I feel more "burned out" that thrill seeking activities no longer does much for me anymore. Too many activities feel "flat" to me now. Neither disgust nor enjoyement.

For example music, movies, tv, video games, etc ... no longer invokes much of anything for me.
 

John Dirk

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For example music, movies, tv, video games, etc ... no longer invokes much of anything for me.
In the case of movies (and probably music too) might it be that the stuff we most often see today is either entirely derivative, superficial fluff or both? This is my general observation anyway, which is why I prefer the classics of my generation. Don't get me wrong, I like big explosions and such at least as much as the next guy but they cannot make up for lack of substance.
 

jcroy

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In the case of movies (and probably music too) might it be that the stuff we most often see today is either entirely derivative, superficial fluff or both? This is my general observation anyway, which is why I prefer the classics of my generation. Don't get me wrong, I like big explosions and such at least as much as the next guy but they cannot make up for lack of substance.

In a general sense, no.

I don't know if there is an easy way of describing it. It is more like something which doesn't generate any "adrenaline rush" type of feeling. Independent of whether it is the original or a derivative/clone.
 

JohnRice

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In the case of movies (and probably music too) might it be that the stuff we most often see today is either entirely derivative, superficial fluff or both? This is my general observation anyway, which is why I prefer the classics of my generation. Don't get me wrong, I like big explosions and such at least as much as the next guy but they cannot make up for lack of substance.
I’m picturing you sitting on your front porch yelling at kids to get off your lawn. :D
 

jcroy

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I’m picturing you sitting on your front porch yelling at kids to get off your lawn. :D

In the recent past, I would have used the "original vs derivative/clone" argument as an explanation for my disinterest.

Over the past year or so, I have come to the realization that this particular explanation is patently false for me.
 

Walter Kittel

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In the case of movies (and probably music too) might it be that the stuff we most often see today is either entirely derivative, superficial fluff or both?

I was prepared to argue, and I do believe, that original works in the arts continue to be created, but the qualifier of most is probably an accurate assessment. There is a lot of derivative and/or inconsequential entertainment, but I would argue that due to human nature it is not limited to contemporary times (if the use of today was meant to convey that sentiment) and has been with us since man began artistic endeavors. No doubt this does vary, but even in the 'golden' periods of various art forms there was plenty of derivative content.


This is my general observation anyway, which is why I prefer the classics of my generation. Don't get me wrong, I like big explosions and such at least as much as the next guy but they cannot make up for lack of substance.

I tend to agree that this is generally my preference as well, partly because one can be selective in their choice of entertainment. When we look to the past, there are vast catalogs of music, films, television series, and other art forms that we can enjoy; selectively ignoring much of the dross (from our viewpoints) in the process. Of course, nostalgia and the idea of revisiting content from our formative years offers up a powerful attraction (at least for me.)

- Walter.
 

jcroy

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Eilish is an interesting listen. She seems to defy any easy categorizations, and figured out how to write catchy tunes at a young age. Quite rare, even back in the day.

Gershwin is always a memorable listen for me. Even though I don't know the name of many of the pieces.
 

John Dirk

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A beautiful collaboration. I found this in season 13 of Grey's Anatomy. The music makes the show [almost] bearable.

Sebastian Kole - Remember Home ft. Alessia Cara​

 

BobO'Link

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Sebastian Kole, "Remember Home" ft. Alessia Cara - I really like this one, except for Alessia Cara. I just don't care for her voice or style.
 

Malcolm R

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I've been a lifelong fan of Dead or Alive since first hearing "You Spin Me Round (Like a Record)" in 1985 (the song actually hit the UK Top 5 twice, first at #1 in 1985 then again at #5 in 2006). The album "Youthquake" was one of the first albums I ever bought and I think I wore out my first cassette. "You Spin Me Round" and "Brand New Lover" were their two Top 15 hits in the US, though they had several other Top 40 hits in the UK and on the US Dance charts.

Sadly, I've always thought that one of their more interesting songs was overlooked, "Son of a Gun", which I'd always wished was the follow up single to "Brand New Lover" in 1986. I love the arrangement on this, which made an effort to be something just a little bit different than the standard shiny Britpop of the time coming out of PWL with Rick Astley, Kylie Minogue, and Bananarama among many others. I love Pete Burns' voice and the drums/percussion.

 

John Dirk

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I've been a lifelong fan of Dead or Alive since first hearing "You Spin Me Round (Like a Record)" in 1985 (the song actually hit the UK Top 5 twice, first at #1 in 1985 then again at #5 in 2006). The album "Youthquake" was one of the first albums I ever bought and I think I wore out my first cassette. "You Spin Me Round" and "Brand New Lover" were their two Top 15 hits in the US, though they had several other Top 40 hits in the UK and on the US Dance charts.

Sadly, I've always thought that one of their more interesting songs was overlooked, "Son of a Gun", which I'd always wished was the follow up single to "Brand New Lover" in 1986. I love the arrangement on this, which made an effort to be something just a little bit different than the standard shiny Britpop of the time coming out of PWL with Rick Astley, Kylie Minogue, and Bananarama among many others. I love Pete Burns' voice and the drums/percussion.


Interesting! Can't wait to hear what others think. For me, I find the beat a bit overpowering but I like the underlying rhythm. When I listen to vocal selections I like to concentrate on lyrics and it's a bit difficult here because of the strong and repetitive drum track and some of the background effects.
 

John Dirk

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Here is a great example of a Rap track where the beat is secondary to the lyrics. When I originally heard this back in the 80's I wasn't a fan because it just wasn't catchy enough for my young ears. I wasn't able to appreciate the wordplay and lyrical prowess on display at that time.

Rakim [an artist I've mentioned here before] was known for simple beats accompanied by complex, thought-provoking lyrics. That's why several of his compositions were later remixed using an instrumental track from another [usually Pop] artist, like the MJ remix I shared back in post #2389 I think. Rakim was 20 years old when this was released.

Rakim - Microphone Fiend
 
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JohnRice

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A beautiful collaboration. I found this in season 13 of Grey's Anatomy. The music makes the show [almost] bearable.

Sebastian Kole - Remember Home ft. Alessia Cara​


Love it.

The really like modern gospel aspect of it.

Thanks John.
 

JohnRice

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I've been a lifelong fan of Dead or Alive since first hearing "You Spin Me Round (Like a Record)" in 1985 (the song actually hit the UK Top 5 twice, first at #1 in 1985 then again at #5 in 2006). The album "Youthquake" was one of the first albums I ever bought and I think I wore out my first cassette. "You Spin Me Round" and "Brand New Lover" were their two Top 15 hits in the US, though they had several other Top 40 hits in the UK and on the US Dance charts.

Sadly, I've always thought that one of their more interesting songs was overlooked, "Son of a Gun", which I'd always wished was the follow up single to "Brand New Lover" in 1986. I love the arrangement on this, which made an effort to be something just a little bit different than the standard shiny Britpop of the time coming out of PWL with Rick Astley, Kylie Minogue, and Bananarama among many others. I love Pete Burns' voice and the drums/percussion.


Just… not my cup of tea. I think I heard more than enough of this in my teens to set me for life. About every ten years I listen to the sole Frankie album I have… and I’m set for the next ten years.
 

JohnRice

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Here is a great example of a Rap track where the beat is secondary to the lyrics. When I originally heard this back in the 80's I wasn't a fan because it just wasn't catchy enough for my young ears. I wasn't able to appreciate the wordplay and lyrical prowess on display at that time.

Rakim [an artist I've mentioned here before] was known for simple beats accompanied by complex, thought-provoking lyrics. That's why several of his compositions were later remixed using an instrumental track from another [usually Pop] artist, like the MJ remix I shared back in post #2389 I think. Rakim was 20 years old when this was released.

Rakim - Microphone Fiend

This started off well. A little infusion of Rick James, which is a good thing. Unfortunately, it still has the common problem. It’s the same measure repeated over and over for five minutes. After a while, I’m ready to movie on.
 

BobO'Link

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Dead or Alive, "Son of a Gun" - What I hear is just another generic 80s electronica style dance/pop tune. Absolutlely not a style I care for.

Rakim, "Microphone Fiend" - Nope, still just don't get it...

I feel somewhat compelled to continue commenting on the tracks from these styles in spite of feeling like a broken record with my comments. That's as much as anything so it won't be taken that I'm ignoring them. I *do* listen as there's always a chance one of them will strike my fancy...
 

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