The Cranes are Flying

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jim Rankin, Jul 28, 2002.

  1. Jim Rankin

    Jim Rankin Stunt Coordinator

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    Just saw this on Sundance, what an amazing film! I have been holding off on renting/purchasing this disc because I wasn't familiar with it - I am definitely adding this one to my collection! Excellent performances from the cast, and a very engaging story to boot. This is one of those rare films that transcends any cultural boundaries, telling a timeless story about love during war. Two of the scenes that really stood out for me were:
    When Veronica and Mark were in the apartment during the air raid - and the montage where Boris got shot - just beautiful cinematography!

    Can't wait to get this one - [​IMG] Regards, Jim
     
  2. Adam Lenhardt

    Adam Lenhardt Executive Producer

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    My high school global studies department imposes a sophmore thesis paper on a historical topic of our choosing. I did mine on Russian cinema through the Czarist, Soviet, and Democratic eras. The Cranes are Flying is one of the pinnacles of fifties Russian cinema. Glad to hear you enjoyed it. Mikhail Kalatozov's comeback picture, it was IIRC the most realistic Soviet portrayal of war up to that point.
     
  3. Brook K

    Brook K Lead Actor

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    Technically outstanding, and a moving story well-told. I hope that we see more of Kalatozov's work become available.
    I'd also recommend Ballad of a Soldier and a later Kalatozov film with even more impressive cinematography, but a more propagandized story I Am Cuba
     
  4. Deepak Shenoy

    Deepak Shenoy Supporting Actor

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    I was intrigued by The Cranes Are Flying ever since I read Gary Tooze's review of the Ruscico version, but I decided to wait for the Criterion version (since it was mentioned in a chat a while back). I ended up liking this movie so much that I picked up many of the other relatively obscure releases (compared to the Kurosawa, Fellini and Hitchcock titles) from Criterion including Ballad of a Soldier and the 4 Czech films Closely Watched Trains, The Shop on Main Street, The Loves of a Blonde and Firemen's Ball. I would highly recommend each and every one of these.
     

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