Smilebox finally - How soon for 3-D?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Bob Furmanek, Jan 26, 2006.

  1. Bob Furmanek

    Bob Furmanek Insider
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    Kudos to WB for the new transfer of HOW THE WEST IS WON, preserving the intended cinematic ratio, inclusive of Cinerama join lines. After all, this is how it was photographed, and this is how the filmmakers intended it to be seen.

    How soon before WB (and others) start respecting the filmmakers intent and release field-sequential transfers of their vintage 3-D titles, such as House of Wax, Kiss Me Kate, Dial M for Murder, etc?
     
  2. Richard--W

    Richard--W Banned

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    Perhaps they don't think there's much interest in 3-D DVD.

    That may change next year when Lucas and Cameron release their tentpole films in 3-D.

    Also, WB etc. are probably aware that the field-sequential system only works with standard CRT televisions. People who watch on high-end technologies won't be able to play a field-sequential 3-D DVD.

    Or am I missing something?

    eidted to add another thought: I think it would take a new, or a series of new, star-driven, tentpole 3-D blockbusters to persuade the studios to even consider it. New contemporary films in 3-D that they can make a lot of money on. While it's true that old movies sell on home video, they don't sell anywhere near the quantity of a Speilberg or a Lucas or a Cameron blockbuster. I think it will take more than one 3-D blockbuster to put a home-viewing 3-D technology across in the mass marketplace, and then distributors will demand the same thing they've been demanding for theatrical 3-D exhibition: a quantity of product to justify the expense.
     
  3. dana martin

    dana martin Cinematographer

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    Oddly enough , i have wondered about this with the advances in technology, most theme parks have some form of it, i remember a great 3D Hichcock seen from dial M and the birds that universal Orlando had for some time.

    There already have been films released that were released in 3D Creature From the Black Lagoon, House of wax, (Price) not the crap that just came out.
    i also remember the resurgence of this on tv in the early 80's you had to go to like a Quick/Stop to get your free glasses, and it was fun, made an old movie that the station cut the network feed, had a local sponsor for it and showed Gorilla at Large

    This was an ABC affiliate in Columbus OH, channel 6 i think, early 80's on a Thursday night, couple of local radio guys hosted it, and i had a house full of people watching this.

    Times have changed but i think limited items could work for this, it doesn't have to be new, the two titles i mentioned are welcome in my house, flat or 3D, i just wish i had the opportunity to see them both ways.
     
  4. Richard--W

    Richard--W Banned

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    Dana Martin

    The broadcasts you remember from the early 1980s were done in the anaglyph 3-D system. It requires the wearing of red and blue, or red and green, glasses. This system delivers an extremely poor quality 3-D experience, a kind of pseudo or fraudulent 3-D. After awhile the retina begins to correct for the colored gels and it becomes annoying, if not headache inducing. This system is nothing more than a cheap gimmick, although Robert Rodriguez got a lot of mileage out of it recently.

    Mr. Furmanek is referring to the field-sequential 3-D system for electronic and video viewing. This is a high-quality system that's just perfect for people who take their movies, and entertainment, seriously. It requires the use of polarized shutter glasses that inter-cut the right eye view with the left eye view so fast you can't see the difference, only the depth. This system mimics the optical 3-D that was projected theatrically in the 1950s and again in the mid-1980s. The optical system breaks down into two other systems -- a single camera / proejctor system, and a two-camera / projector system. Both required polarized glasses -- cool shades -- and both deliver a stunning 3-D experience, when properly shot.

    People who are impressed by anaglyph have generally never seen an authentic 3-D film.

    Quick, get yourself to an Imax theater. Watch their 3-D films and movies will never be the same for you again.
     
  5. dana martin

    dana martin Cinematographer

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    this is what i was describing that most theme parks use also, please understand i include Universal Orlando in this, this is the same set up used for there Hitchcock presentation, and i have enjoyed IMAX as well, as stated before i only hope to see this expand to the home market sometime.
     
  6. Steve Phillips

    Steve Phillips Screenwriter

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    Is this new transfer of HTWWW available on DVD now, or has it been shown on TCM?
     
  7. Richard--W

    Richard--W Banned

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    Is there some other viable home-viewing 3-D system besides the field-sequential system for CRT televisions? I would like to hear Mr. Furmanek's thoughts on the matter.
     
  8. GregK

    GregK Screenwriter

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    With the proper processing, most DLP displays can handle field-sequential 3-D quite well, and can outperform standard CRTs in terms of L/R cancellation. LCOS displays should also fare well.



    Some component based B&W 3-D anaglyph presentations have worked "OK", but a field-sequential version always looks better, with it's superior L/R cancellation, lack of color artifacts, and sharper presentation.
     

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