S-Video or Component for DVD?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Allen Longcor, Dec 5, 2001.

  1. Allen Longcor

    Allen Longcor Supporting Actor

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    Which one is generally considered better and is there really a difference? Also isnt there a rule that you have to use the same type of connection for two things in your home theater? Can you refresh my memory as to what those are?
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    Component is better than S-Video. How much so depends on your equipment and your individual taste. Assuming proper calibration, colors will generally be stronger and cleaner with component.

     
  3. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Composite(RCA) - good

    S-vid - better

    Component - BEST

    The difference between composite and s-vid is VERY noticable, but the difference between component is a little more difficult to discern. As mentioned, results will vary based on your equipment and proper calibration is the only way to make the best of that improvement. I feel it's worth it to use component video, as video is much more sensitive than audio when it comes to cabling.

    I have no idea what you mean by the other quesion either??
     
  4. Allen Longcor

    Allen Longcor Supporting Actor

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    Ok well I was reading the tara labs guide to connections off their website and it says in the Video processor to Amp section to use the same connection that you used in source to processor. I'm not exactly sure what that means and don't have time to check it out right now. Anyone else know anythign about it?
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Using the same kind of connection ...
    That means, if you have a DVD player connected to the video processor (or A/V receiver) using component video, there must also be a component video cable set going to the TV. If you have a dish receiver connected to the vid-pro via S-video, there must also be an S-video cable going to the TV.
    Few if any vid-pro's cross feed their S-video input to their component output, etc.
    Many videophiles shortchange their picture quality by using S-video (or even composite) for DVD just so all sources can go to the TV the same way, eliminating the need to select Video 1 on the TV remote for VCR, Video 2 for DVD, etc. as well as make the selection on the vid-pro remote.
    Other video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  6. Jeremy Little

    Jeremy Little Supporting Actor

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    Let's say that you are using your amp for Audio and Video switching. If your source, let's say a DVD player, is ran into the amp using S-video. You should also make the Monitor output back to the tv an S-video as well. That is all it is saying. Whatever you use to the amp from the source should also be the same connection from the amp to the display.

    Component is best, and when I first bought a pair of components I was NOT impressed. Later, I learned of Video Essentials and Avia: Guide to Home Theater. I decided to adjust the television I owned at the time. It was a Toshiba 32H60 and boy what a difference it makes when the tv is adjusted. I have since moved on to a bigger and better television and component is the only way to go.
     
  7. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    i'm not a 100% on this, but i believe that many of the new generation receivers also allow you to switch between s-video and composite. i do not know of any that switch between all three.
     
  8. Jason Au

    Jason Au Extra

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    Onkyo has at least one receiver that will actually convert a composite signal to s-video. Barring component signals, you can then connect the reciever to your TV with s-video and connect any source to the reciever.
     
  9. Jason Handy

    Jason Handy Second Unit

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    One last point...on this year's Toshiba models, there are a few reports that the component cables can cause some "ringing" in the image, while the corresponding S-video is slightly cleaner. There are a number of threads under the Toshiba section of hometheaterspot.com - have a look.

    Your mileage may vary

    Jason
     
  10. Len Cheong

    Len Cheong Second Unit

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    I've found this to be tv dependent. On my direct view tv toshiba 36x81 , the difference is noticeable in the skin tones - less pink, more reddish tones show up in component. On my pioneer 700hd 16:9, the difference is less noticeable. I still have a sony 7000 dvd player patched through the iscan pro.

    Your best bet is to view scenes with a lot of colour - flowers, etc. You may notice the colour separation better in these scenes.
     
  11. Allen Longcor

    Allen Longcor Supporting Actor

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    Ok so if I connect my DVD player to my TV using a component connection then I have to connect my DVD player to my receiver using a component connection? If so then what would be the use of an optical connection on the DVD player? I was going to use that to connect my DVD player to my receiver. My receiver has on optical in for audio (cd player) and one for video.
     
  12. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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  13. Allen Longcor

    Allen Longcor Supporting Actor

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    Then I can connect my DVD player to my receiver via optical cable and my DVD player to my TV via component with no problems???
     
  14. DonRoeber

    DonRoeber Screenwriter

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    Allen,

    The Optical output on the DVD player is for audio only. Run that to the receiver, and then component (or svideo) cables to the tv. On the tv, choose the input that the tv is hooked up to (probably with the Input button on the remote), and on the receiver, choose DVD. Sit back, and enjoy the show.
     
  15. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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  16. Allen Longcor

    Allen Longcor Supporting Actor

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    Thanks for all the help. I was confused as to why I would have to use the same connection when one was for video and the other was for audio. I basically still don't get it, but as long as I don't have to worry about it then I'm cool.
     
  17. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    The "same cable" thing was only for the receiver. Sounds like you have the right idea for the DVD, and it should work just fine. [​IMG]
     
  18. Christian Dolan

    Christian Dolan Stunt Coordinator

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    As I understand it, when you generate a Y/C signal from a component source, you have to modulate two color-difference signals onto a single color sub-carrier called chroma or chrominance (the C in Y/C). This is later demodulated by the display device, similar to the way that stereo audio is demodulated from a single FM carrier in your radio. As I said, this is as I understand it. Feel free to correct it.

    -Christian
     

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