Progressive Scan DVD Player and Analog TVs

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Justin Bats, Jun 25, 2003.

  1. Justin Bats

    Justin Bats Auditioning

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    Hello All,

    I tried to search for this answer, but I did not find anything relating to my question. If ya'll do not mind helping me out on this one, I would very much appreciate it.

    So, here goes: Do analog televisions with component video inputs benefit at all from progressive scanning? I thought that the component video signaling inside an analog set is actually digital. Thus, would the television know the difference between progressive scanning and interlaced scanning if the DVD player was doing all of the work? I know that most progressive players allow the user to choose between interlaced or progressive, but is the progressive scanning going to work on analog set that allows connection to component video inputs?

    Thanks in advance for all of your help.[​IMG]

    Regards,

    Justin
     
  2. JamesHl

    JamesHl Supporting Actor

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    No, it won't make a difference.
     
  3. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    You need a set capable of displaying the HD signal, not just component inputs. Standard analog, non-HD capable TV, you will see no image using progressive.
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    For your ordinary "analog" TV you must manually set the progressive scan DVD player's component output to "interlaced".

    The component video that we use red, green, and blue colored RCA plug cables for is actually analog. Generally no digital processing takes place unless there is a scaler or progressive scan converter in the TV, or PIP is in use, or if the TV uses something other than CRT's to generate the picture.

    An ordinary TV does not check to be sure the input is the proper kind (scan rate), if the input is incorrect, the results are unpredictable. One possible result of feeding progressive video into a non-progressive TV is two squished side by side jittery duplicate pictures. Don't deliberately try that because some TV sets can be damaged.

    A progressive scan TV or HDTV which allows all the kinds of inputs (for the consumer's convenience) to be fed through the same set of component video jacks will usually automatically select progressive, interlaced, or HDTV as the case may be.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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