plasma vs LCD

Discussion in 'Displays' started by stewart borland, Jan 2, 2005.

  1. stewart borland

    stewart borland Stunt Coordinator

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    Title says it all really... I'd like to move up to a 42" tv and think it's time to move away from the old traditional style tv.
    Which would have the better picture plasma or LCD + of course experts feel free to throw in any other relevant points this newbie won't know about:b
     
  2. Ryan Wishton

    Ryan Wishton Screenwriter

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    Well, Plasma to me has a better pic, better black levels, and is more CRT picture like.

    But, LCD can do well too. It more depends on the tv you buy than the technology. Both have the ability of giving great picures. It's more personal opinion.

    For instance, a quality LCD will give you much better quality than a cheap no name clunker Plasma and Vice Versa.

    Each technology has pros and cons. Both have excellent viewing angles which sadden DLP, CRT, etc. Lets face it. For excellent viewing angles, they stink. If you need good viewing angles, both will be well performers.

    Plasma will give you more depth to the picture as well IMO. I just bought one (floating glass sony) and I can see what people mean now. A variety of DVD's and HDTV has a depth to them. Almost like looking through a real life window. Something I never experienced of a CRT ever.

    Plasma Bad Points. They need care. Lcd's need less care. Plasmas can burn in. So, you have to make sure to keep good settings, not watch too many tv channels with static logos (Spike TV), not use it as a complete video game moniter, etc.

    I love the Plasma, but if going back, I might not have bought one due to the burn in issue. The ghosting freaks me out and burn in scares me. I also used to tend to fall asleep with the tv on. Not wise. I woke up the next morning and the whole DVD menu from a movie was ghosted into the screen. Luckily, it wasnt burn in as it went away (I thought it was at first). I never even experienced such things on CRT. It's scary. So, I now have a timer set every night where the tv shuts itself off.

    Plasma has excellent pic quality and sound quality (depending on model).

    LCD's dont have a true black level yet, but they are more friendly suited to video game use and those things which use static images.

    The closest black level I have seen is the SonyXBR950 Floating Glass LCD. This was a tv I wanted. But, it was too small and way too expensive IMO. $5499 for a 32 inch. But, it is the Sony reference quality LCD. I absolutely loved the look of it. My favorite look of any flat panel tv at this time period.

    The Plasma I bought (also floating glass) but a different design comes in second.

    I wanted a very good sound system and pic. So, I bought the Sony37XS955. Has the subwoofer, etc built in. I didnt want to spend money on home theater audio and dont have the room. This line of tv's has the best sound of any Plasma TV speakers I have heard.

    I liked the pic of other Plasmas too, but the very good sound and design is really why I went with the Sony. Many Plasmas have really crappy sound. Not this one. Plus I only paid $3000. Still very expensive. But, it sells for $4400 at stores like Best Buy and Circuit City so I got a good deal.
     
  3. stewart borland

    stewart borland Stunt Coordinator

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    Wow, thanks Ryan - that's what I love about this forum, people give so much info, willingly and free [​IMG]

    Thanks for all that, but one other question... I was reading from another link about LCD having a lag with fast moving objects which resulted almost in a kind of trail?

    True or false? Noticeable or not?
     
  4. Elinor

    Elinor Supporting Actor

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    I have a RP-LCD and have only seen "trails" once ... when swimmer Michael Phelps was flapping his arms warming up in the Olympics. I have watched some football, hockey, basketball, baseball, lots of DVDs, and plenty of HD (OTA and satellite) and just have not seen this problem. It is my understanding that the RP LCDs are less prone to motion trails than direct view LCDs.

    I think Ryan gave a good analysis.

    The only weaknesses I have seen in RP-LCD is black levels and some vertical banding in some content (rare). They have not made me disappointed in my tv though. No type of tv sold is perfect.
     
  5. stewart borland

    stewart borland Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for that Elinor... just one question for the ignorant :b what is RP-LCD?
     
  6. Elinor

    Elinor Supporting Actor

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    Stewart, RP-LCD is Rear Projection LCD. Direct view LCDs are the thin flat panels, like computer monitors. They also make them bigger for tv use.

    RP-LCD takes a very small LCD panel (mine has
     
  7. Allen Hirsch

    Allen Hirsch Supporting Actor

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    That's a function of the response time of the LCD's video circuitry - the best/better LCDs have a response time of 16 ms or less - if it's slower than that, you'll see the "trails".

    The plasma screen has a more finite life than an LCD - the gasses eventually lose its "exciteability": the half-life of these gasses is approximately 25,000 to 30,000 thousand hours. At this point, the phosphors will glow half as brightly as they did when the set was new. There is no way to replace these gases; the display simply continues to grow dimmer with use.

    An LCD uses less power and is usually less "noisy" than a plasma. A plasma won't work well at higher elevations (above 6000 ft). Plasmas, OTOH, have an edge in color saturation, viewing angle, and contrast. Here's a good link with more complete comparisons of features, strengths and weaknesses:

    http://www.plasmatvbuyingguide.com/p...ma-vs-lcd.html
     
  8. Mort Corey

    Mort Corey Supporting Actor

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    Not trying to be persnickity, but many newer plasma displays are rated at 40-60,000 hours to half life. Even at 30,000 hours, that's a looooooong time [​IMG]

    In the 42" realm I think you'll find a quality plasma display for less money than a comparable LCD (not RP/LCD)....quite a bit less money if you opt for an ED unit.

    Mort
     
  9. stewart borland

    stewart borland Stunt Coordinator

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    Sorry... terminology again :b ED unit??
     
  10. Mort Corey

    Mort Corey Supporting Actor

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    ED=Enhanced Definition vs HD=High Definition. Either will display a true HD picture and give stunning results wih DVD input...the HD unit has more pixels making up the picture. The ED units generally display 480p (480 lines progressive whereas standard TV's are 480i...interlaced) and HD units display 720p (or 768/770..depending on the display) as their native rate. (Referring to plasma TV's here)

    Mort
     
  11. Allen Hirsch

    Allen Hirsch Supporting Actor

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    ED is certainly better than SD, I'll grant you - especially if the monitor is being fed an HD signal.
    But ED (480p) is NOT HD (720p or 1080i). That difference is noticeable up close in larger screen sizes (40"+).

    With current economics, at least, LCDs prevail below 40"; plasmas prevail over 40" in screen size.
     

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