OARs of Disney Animated Movies

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by ChrisLee, Oct 25, 2001.

  1. ChrisLee

    ChrisLee Stunt Coordinator

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    Anybody know the OARs of the Disney animated movies? I'm talking about the 41 that started with Snow White and ends most recently with Atlantis. I know the bulk of them are academy thus the shape of a 4:3 television. Which movies were made in 2:35:1 and 1:85:1?
     
  2. Bjorn Olav Nyberg

    Bjorn Olav Nyberg Supporting Actor

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    2.35:1 movies except Atlantis include Lady and the tramp, Sleeping beauty and The black cauldron (Possibly 2.20:1)
    The majority of movies, if I have understood correctly were produced at something like 1.66:1, intended for theatrical projection at 1.85:1 and 1.33:1 for home video. (Super35 for animated features [​IMG] )
    There are plenty of Disney aficionados on the forum. Now that I have opened my mouth, every one of them will start crawling out of the woodwork and interpret the Super35 remark seriously [​IMG]
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  3. Hendrik

    Hendrik Supporting Actor

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    ...ahh... well... I think I can safely say that all of Disney's animated features up to Lady And The Tramp were filmed with the standard 'Academy aperture' (1.37:1)...
    . . . [​IMG] . . .
     
  4. Lars Vermundsberget

    Lars Vermundsberget Supporting Actor

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    I agree to what Hendrik said and to the first paragraph of what Bjørn Olav said (hei til deg, forresten).
    Thus we have covered all titles through the 1950's and The Black Cauldron (1985).
    This is what I think about what's left:
    101 Dalmatians (NOT DalmatiOns) (1961) up to somewhere about Robin Hood (1973) had, as far as I understand, theatrical aspect ratios of 1.66-1.85:1 (or 1.75:1 as the imdb used to list). The 4:3 video versions are not P&S, but rather "open matte" presentations.
    The Many Adventures Of Winnie The Pooh is 1.33:1.
    The Rescuers (1977) and up (not including TBC and Atlantis) have OAR of 1.66-1.85:1. 4:3 video versions are cropped.
    I would of course like to be corrected if I'm wrong.
     
  5. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

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    Hi everybody,

    I'd like to resurrect this thread because I saw THE FOX & THE HOUND in one of the shops and it is 1.33:1. If this film is truly open matte then I can accept it but if it is pan & scan I will wait. Does anyone have any information other than what has been mentioned by the helpful folks above? Thanks.
     
  6. Jeffrey Gray

    Jeffrey Gray Second Unit

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    I think all the flat Disney animated movies were produced at 1.33:1 (but with intended theatrical aspect ratios of 1.66:1-1.85:1) up until, oh, The Fox and the Hound. So that one is open-matte on DVD.
     
  7. LukeB

    LukeB Cinematographer

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    Yes, Fox and the Hound is the last of the "classics" animated for 1.33:1 and matted for theaters. Disney has been good about giving us animated films in original aspect ratio (as opposed to the disaster that is their live-action films). Even though there is some uncertainty as to what is the proper ratio for the animated films from 1961 - 1981 that are Fullscreen on DVD, I have no reason to believe that the DVD presentations are compromising anything and that Disney decided only to release those ones in Pan & Scan. Seems like a matter of either IMDb having erroneous info, or just having the ratios compromised for theatrical matting.
    Buy without worry before they put it back in the vaults!!! [​IMG]
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  8. Patrick McCart

    Patrick McCart Lead Actor

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    The films made in non-widescreen processes like Panavision or Technirama were filmed at 1.33:1 (CAPS films made after Little Mermaid are hard-matted 1.66:1) and meant to be seen from 1.33:1 to 1.85:1.
     
  9. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

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    Thanks everybody!
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Marty Christion

    Marty Christion Stunt Coordinator

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    Just FYI, Lady and the Tramp was animated for academy ratio (1.37:1), and then reformatted for Cinemascope. Not the other way around, as is the common misconception.
     
  11. Daniel L

    Daniel L Stunt Coordinator

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    So the fact the the eye line between Lady & Tramp during the dinner sequence is off in the full-frame version, while the 2.35 presentation is dead on is a fluke?

    Daniel L
     
  12. Kim Donald

    Kim Donald Stunt Coordinator

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    Lady & Tramp was composed and shot twice Cinemascope and Academy
     
  13. Bryan Tuck

    Bryan Tuck Screenwriter

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    The only one I can speak for is 101 Dalmatians. I saw this during it's last theatrical release several years ago. It was shown windowboxed at 1.37:1 on a flat print, the same as the recent re-release of Wizard of Oz.
     
  14. Joseph Bolus

    Joseph Bolus Cinematographer

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  15. Steve Phillips

    Steve Phillips Screenwriter

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    Yes, LADY AND THE TRAMP was created in two versions. The CinemaScope version does not simply matte the top and the bottom. SLEEPING BEAUTY was also 2:35 to 1.
     
  16. JJR512

    JJR512 Supporting Actor

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    Umm...Why would Disney produce (animate) a movie at 1.33 with an intended theater ratio of 1.85? I mean, why would they go through the trouble and time of drawing and coloring the top and bottom of the frame if they knew it was going to be matted anyway?

    Normally I would agree that the widescreen version of a movie that was shot in full frame but intended to be matted, and was in fact matted for theatrical showing, is the correct OAR. I agree because the matted, or widescreen, version, is the intended version. But I'm not so sure what to think in this case, because as I said, I can't understand why a full frame would be animated if only part of it was intended to be seen. It sounds like a big waste of time, effort, and money.
     
  17. Michael St. Clair

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    Justin,
    Well, I'm pretty sure that these days they aren't doing 1.33:1. I thought the current films, all animated using the CAPS system, were animated at 1.66:1 for that same projection in Europe and 1.85:1 in the USA.
    I'm sure somebody will correct me if I am wrong. [​IMG]
     
  18. BenjaminG

    BenjaminG Stunt Coordinator

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    Excellent. I had read that Robin Hood was panscan rubbish, and then I refused to buy it. Now I will buy it!
     
  19. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

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    I think a possible reason for this is because Mr. Disney was well aware of the importance of television, and he knew that most of the films would end up on TV someday. Does anyone have any hard info to support this?
     

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