My other dumb question about recievers...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brad_W, Nov 26, 2001.

  1. Brad_W

    Brad_W Screenwriter

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    I'm dumb:

    Why does a reciever have video output/input? Since a reciever is for audio, what purpose does the video out or in serve?
     
  2. Sean Conklin

    Sean Conklin Screenwriter

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    Brad, the Video input/output is used for switching multiple video sources.

    Lets see....lets say you have a TV with only one S- video connection and you have a DVD player and a DSS both with S-video connections, and you have a receiver with 3 or 4 S-Video inputs and 1 S-video output, well you plug both s- video outputs from the DVD player and DSS into the corresponding S-video inputs on receiver and use the 1 s-video out from the receiver to the TV.

    Also this is nice so you don't have to switch sources on your TV.

    Hope that explanation helps.

    And hey Brad, there are no dumb questions here.
     
  3. Brad_W

    Brad_W Screenwriter

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    Sean,

    So when you switch to (using your example) DVD or DSS on your reciever, the picture will be piped through the S-Video on the TV and display a picture? I never thought of that. That reminds me of the video game selectors that you hook up to your vcr.

    Thank you.
     
  4. Vietor

    Vietor Stunt Coordinator

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    Also it makes changing sources much easier for the electronicaly challanged that may want to use your system. It only takes one button to switch everything over from one source to another.
     
  5. Sean Conklin

    Sean Conklin Screenwriter

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  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Brad: There is 1 problem that confounds people the first time they try running video through their receiver: The receiver WILL NOT convert one type of video to another!
    There are 3 kinds of video signals common in HT equipment:
    • Composite: This takes a single cable with RCA connectors on each end, usually colored yellow. It is the lowest/most-common type of signal.
    • SVideo: This is a funny connector that looks like the keyboard plug on a computer. With a DVD player and a 50" or larger TV, it will give you a 20% better picture than Composite.
    • Component: This is 3 video cables in a bundle with RCA plugs. (The 3 cables are all identical except for color bands, and they are actually just 3 Composite video cables bundled together). With a DVD player and a 50" or larger TV, this cable will give you a 25% better picture than Composite.
    If you run Composite from a VCR & CATV box to your receiver, you must run a Composite cable from the receiver to the TV so you can "see" these devices.
    If you add a SVideo cable from a DVD player to the reciever, you will NOT see the signal on the TV until you add a SVideo cable from the receiver to the TV. And then you have to grab the TV remote and switch inputs to see the SVideo signal.
    The same goes for Component.
    Hope this helps.
     
  7. Brad_W

    Brad_W Screenwriter

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    Bob,

    Thanks for the info. I do know about the different types of connections and since I prefer componant cable, are there any recievers that do this via componant or just composite and S?
     
  8. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

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    Bob,

    Your statement is 99% true. Kenwoods top three receivers have what is called "universal video" which does automatically upconvert or downconvert all incoming video signals to the highest available connection on your tv monitor. And the newest line (models VR-5090, VR-5700, and VR-5900) claim to do this at HD quality too! I have not seen it in person though so I cannot attest to how well these units accomplish this.

    Also, starting at $1500 these aren't for the everyday consumer. Oh well....

    Dan Hine
     

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