Methods for storing big screen TV. is cold ok??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Tomas_S, Oct 30, 2002.

  1. Tomas_S

    Tomas_S Agent

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    Hi folks..looking at buying a new TV to replace my 61" sony RPTV. I'm thinking about holding on to it and using it for a basement TV when we move next year but wanted to know to do's and donts for storing a TV like this.

    I'm considering a storage unit, these are generally humidity controlled but not temperature controlled. Are there any problems with keeping it in below-freezing conditions?

    Thanks in advance.

    Tomas
     
  2. Jeff Schnebelen

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    I would recommend a Climate controlled unit. It is about $10 to $15 more a month but with electronics like that, I would pay the extra. Don't forget to get renters insurance on that shed. If it or one close to it burns down, you will be s.o.l. without insurance. I stored my 47" rp Sony for about a year this way. When I got moved into a house again, it fired up just perfectly. Thats just my 2 cents.
     
  3. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm no TV tech nor do I know much of anything about electronics per se, but I suspect storing something such as a reciever or a CD player in sub-zero cold wouldn't be too much of a problem. But concerning TV, with vacuum tube CRTs, complex lenses, mirrors, and lenticular screens, I'd also recommend keeping that storage area above freezing. You never know where something will condense, cause corrosion or mold, etc.
     
  4. Scott_AH

    Scott_AH Stunt Coordinator

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    And for the love of God, make sure you let it get back to room temp a couple hours before you turn it on. I used to deliver big screens and, on the cold days, everyone would want to turn it on the moment we entered their house. We'd warn them but you wouldn't believe how many people would call and say they heard a "loud pop" or worse right after we left and they'd ask for a new one.

    Scott
     
  5. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    It all depends on how cold it gets. persoanlly my main concers would be two things, first of all thermal shock. that is exactly what scott was describing, when some items particularly metal or glass go from a warm or hot temperature to a cold or vice versa the parts may heat up very quickly. what happens is the outside of a part will heat or cool faster than the inside because of the high temperature gradient. when this happens the contraction or expansion as the case may be can be occuring at a high enough rate that the size of the part may vary greatly throughout the thickness of it. this size difference induces stresses and strains throighout the internals of the part, and in the case of tubes and such could cause them to explode or implode. thats why you have to let the tv heat up to room temperature before you turn it on, going from subzero to operating temperature can definitely cause thermal shock. but this should not be an issue for storing, just let it warm up before you turn it back on

    the second issue is dealing mostly with the soldering, by storing it in a cold environment the metal used for solders will probably contract more than the board it si attacked to which "could" cause some of these connections to loosen or break..... it realyl all depends on how cold it gets and how well it was put together. if you are talking temperatures around 0C then you are "probably" ok but it all depends on what piece fo mind is worth to you. much lower than 0C and i would definitely be wary, but hey its your call.
     
  6. DerekF

    DerekF Stunt Coordinator

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    When all else fails, consult the owner's manual! [​IMG](from a 50HDX)
    It says to leave it for 7 hours after coming in from the cold, and do not store or use below 5° Celsius (41°F).
     
  7. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Also, reduce the tire pressure, drain the gas tank completely, remove the cylinder heads and coat them liberally with motor oil and then replace them, and change the oil as well. When you're ready take the unit out of storage, change the oil again. This worked best with my Honda CBR900RR, and ... oops, I'm not posting at motorcycle.com! [​IMG]
     

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