how to fix whites and daylight in projected movies

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by lissie, Nov 5, 2001.

  1. lissie

    lissie Agent

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 1999
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Can anyone help me??????This may be a case of an old (almost antique) projector. Last night I projected Saving Private Ryan from an 1985 Zenith projector.(Yes, it's huge) Really the quality was great in darker shots ...very clear. But, if there was a bright scene the whites would be fuzzy and clouldy and everything washed out in white... then when there was less daylight the picture would be great again . So, I'm thinking there might be an adjustment that I can make. I know I need to get out of the 80's but ,I'm still working on paying for my Home Theater. I'm not going to always want to project on a large screen very often. Thanks for ANY help! Lissie
     
  2. lissie

    lissie Agent

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 1999
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Can anyone help? Does anyone have any idea what I'm talking about ???? Thanks for any help!
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You will have to play with brightness and contrast, try first decreasing the contrast. If bright objects are fuzzy in the sense they are slightly too big and blur together, your contrast is definitely too high. There is a big tradeoff in high contrast for a bright picture versus life of a projection TV set, notably the three small picture tubes inside it.
    If you have Video Essentials or Avia, view a gray scale step pattern. You may find that the TV is maxing out, treating several of the lightest shades of gray as full white.
    You (perhaps with the help of a serviceman) may also want to explore the screwdriver adjustments (pots) in the back if the brightness and contrast controls don't adjust far enough. For example you might have wanted a contrast of 3 but the contrast control only goes from 5 to 14, while by adjusting something out back you shift the range of the contrast control to 1 to 10 and then are able to adjust the front contrast control to the way you want.
    With an older TV I cannot promise being able to get both a true black and all steps distinguishable on the gray scale.
    Other video hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
    [Edited last by Allan Jayne on November 09, 2001 at 07:55 AM]
    [Edited last by Allan Jayne on November 09, 2001 at 08:01 AM]
     
  4. lissie

    lissie Agent

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 1999
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for your help. I'm not using a tv. I'm projecting it on a screen. Any suggestions??????
     
  5. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 1998
    Messages:
    8,332
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
    How old is the bulb (how many hours are left on it) as it may be approaching end of life?
    ------------------
    http://webhome.idirect.com/~orange1
    ------------------
    My Favourite DVD's
     
  6. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A video projector has (or should have) brightness, contrast, and the other controls that a direct view TV has. For industrial or production equipment the controls may be labeled differently, such as "black level" instead of "brightness", and "white level" or "gray scale" instead of "contrast".
    All of the tests in AVIA or Video Essentials apply to video projectors with CRT's inside. (Most apply to projectors with LCD or DLP also).
    [Edited last by Allan Jayne on November 11, 2001 at 09:14 AM]
     
  7. Chris Derby

    Chris Derby Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2000
    Messages:
    371
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Make sure you're really seeing what you think your seeing. Watching "Saving Private Ryan" has led to some pretty "interesting" threads regarding peoples' display devices. First, before you go off making adhustments, see if you experience the same thing while viewing another movie.
    ------------------
    -derby
     

Share This Page