Feedback problem

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jereme D, Mar 2, 2002.

  1. Jereme D

    Jereme D Stunt Coordinator

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    I have my computer hooked up to my receiver and I am getting some feedback when I select the input (the one that my computer is one) from the receiver. The noise is a loud, constant hum. Here is how everything is hooked up:

    I have a minijack out on my soundcard. I have a short cord going from that to a 25 foot extension cable. The extension cable terminates in standard red/white RCA plugs.

    My receiver is a Pioneer VSX-D850s. I had this hooked up before at our old apartment and it worked fine. I have not changed anything this time. I'm assuming that it has something to do with the powere here, although I haven't had any problems with any of my other equipment.
     
  2. Jagan Seshadri

    Jagan Seshadri Supporting Actor

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    Sounds like a ground loop problem (the ground potential at the computer and the ground potential at the receiver are different, and you're hearing that difference as a 60-Hz hum).

    Try running the computer and the receiver off of the same power bar, as long as you don't exceed the power load limit for the outlet you're powering the power bar from.

    -JNS
     
  3. Jereme D

    Jereme D Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm not an electrician, but that makes sense. :)

    Unfortunately, I cannot put my computer on the same outlet as my receiver. They are on opposite sides of the room. Is there some sort of filter or unit that I can buy to "equalize" the difference?
     
  4. Jagan Seshadri

    Jagan Seshadri Supporting Actor

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    Well, if you could connect your computer audio through an optical link, that would bypass the ground loop problem, otherwise get an extension cord and run both systems off of the same power bar.

    Were the two systems across the room from each other at your previous place, or were they on the same electrical circuit? In other words, if a breaker went, did both the computer and the receiver lose power?

    Bigger still, did you use the 25-foot signal-carrying cord in your previous setup? That is getting long for a minijack output.

    -JNS
     
  5. MattSherlock

    MattSherlock Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey Jereme, I had almost the same set up as you when I had the Pioneer VSXD 710S model. Heres what I had used and still use with my Denon receiver I have now. I use the 25ft sub woofer cable made by Acoustic research and the connection at my computer, I have the rca to mini jack converter from radio shack going into my sound card. My sound card has a digital jack so I plug it into there. Now on the receiver end, I plug the sub cable to the coax digital connection on the receiver. I had no problems and all the sound comming from my computer can be fed into my receiver.
     
  6. Jereme D

    Jereme D Stunt Coordinator

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    "Were the two systems across the room from each other at your previous place, or were they on the same electrical circuit? In other words, if a breaker went, did both the computer and the receiver lose power?"

    I never actually had to trip a breaker. When there was a problem with the power, everything in the house went. Everything came back on at once.

    "Bigger still, did you use the 25-foot signal-carrying cord in your previous setup? That is getting long for a minijack output. "

    I'm not sure what you mean by "signal-carrying cord". The cord that I used was Radioshack's standard minijack to RCA and a 25 foot extension for that cord. I'm not too much concerned with the quality from the computer being perfect.

    My soundcard has neither an optical or coax out, so I will probably have to buy a new one. I already have 8 things plugged into my outlet near my reciever, so I'm guessing I probably shouldn't plug anymore over there.

    Thanks to all who replied!
     
  7. Jagan Seshadri

    Jagan Seshadri Supporting Actor

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  8. MattSherlock

    MattSherlock Stunt Coordinator

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    "My soundcard has neither an optical or coax out"

    I have the 'sound blaster live' card which has neither an optical or coax output but it does have a minijack digital output connection. Its usually used for digital speakers ,minidisc, etc. Then I use the rca to minijack converter. Now if you happen to get one of these cards which are pretty cheap now, you must connect the digital connection from the sound card to you cdrom or dvdrom drive, the connection is on the back of the drive and the connection cord is usually included with the sound card.
     

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