Do you haggle over price?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matt Gordon, Jul 17, 2002.

  1. Matt Gordon

    Matt Gordon Supporting Actor

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    In some situations (like buying a car), a certain amount of negotiation of price is expected. In others, like at Wal-Mart, it seems that it never happens. I consider any store wherein the salesperson earns a commission to be open to negotiation.

    At a major electronics retailer like Best Buy, for instance, I wouldn't haggle over the price of a DVD, but have had success bargaining the price of a DVD player.

    Do you attempt to get a lower price when you shop, and if so, are you any good at it? Do you have any rules or techniques?

    What items is it acceptable to bargain for? If you went shopping for a nice watch or jewelry would you try to get a lower price?
     
  2. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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    Most major retail chains will not bargain at all unless a competitor is selling the same item for less money. If you want to haggle go to a mom-pop store and look at packages (speakers + receiver, etc).

    KyleS
     
  3. Colin-H

    Colin-H Second Unit

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    It doesn't hurt to try. If they have no control over the price they're going to tell you that. Now I go in saying to myself, "I'm not walking out with this product for any more than $x." If the salesman won't give me that price, I don't buy it. Simple as that. I never tried bargaining at Best Buy on anything except an open box item, and I had a little success getting that price lowered.
    In electronics stores in NYC, you're pretty much getting screwed if you don't bargain. Example: A CF card was marked at $85, I walked out with it for $60.
    At 6th Ave., a NJ-based electronics chain, you can bargain pretty freely. They're an authorized dealer for everything, so they're required to list the MSRPs.
    Basically, set a price and stick to it. Most guys would rather lower the price more than usual than lose the sale. Be stubborn.
    My techniques:
    • Never imply need, even if it's urgent. If the salesman knows you need it today, he's got one up on you. Salesmen are always looking for ways to make you "walk out with it today". This gives you an advantage.
    • Hint that you have more business to bring. I like the, "my dad is setting up a home theater soon, we're looking for a reliable place to buy the gear" line.
    • Be friendly. It's always worked better for me than being a hardass. If you try to be hard, the salesman is going to be hard right back and you're going to stalemate.
    • Don't budge too easily. Be stubborn.
    • Know what you're talking about, but don't act superior. Act superior and you might get the salesman pissed off.
    • ALWAYS SHOOT LOWER. This is probably most important. You want something for $550? Ask for $500. Basic rule of bargaining: ask for more than you expect to get.
    • Finally, remember YOU ARE THE CONSUMER. You are the one with the money. It is YOUR decision whether or not you are going to buy. Don't let anyone pressure you. Money = power, and you've got the cash.
     
  4. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    Good advice Colin. I've bargined on most of the electronics I've bought...esp open box units. It also helps to say hi to the staff when ever you're in the store...esp if you're with someone as it looks like you're bringing in new clients etc. I've bought a few items from a local HT store and always try to use the same guy or at least let him know I'm in the store...I might have paid a little more for "X" last week then their competitor but I know that tomorrow when I go in for "Y" I've got a good chance of getting an even better deal so over all its to my advantage. Case in point the price I got me Rotel 1066 for was near cost that didn't happen my accident[​IMG]
     
  5. Bill Eberhardt

    Bill Eberhardt Stunt Coordinator

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    When I'm ready to buy, I'll take printouts of the prices the online retailers are offering. I ask the salesman how close he can come to those prices. I let the salesman know I'd prefer to buy locally, but...
    When I bought my Denon 4802, I wrote a price on the printout I had and told him if he could meet it I would walk out of here today with it. I got it. [​IMG]
     
  6. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    hehe I like watching my dad haggle on cars just to watch the salesmen get frustrated. Colin hit it on the head. With gear or cars, anything really.. if you let the salesman know you want it bad and need it soon they've got you. I like to show interest in lots of stuff, like a car, if they ask "do you prefer an automatic or manual" the answer is always a shrug and a "doesn't matter". drives them crazy, same goes for color, options, everything. The more they think you could walk next door and buy something similar and not really care the better your chances IMO.
     
  7. John Gates

    John Gates Second Unit

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    I haggle often. A good, casual opener if you are shy is to simply ask: "Is this price firm?" If you ask, you must appear bored and indifferent. Then, you can lapse into other tactics already mentioned.
    Very often, the answer is "yes, our prices are firm." But occasionally, even standard B&M stores will respond with "well, what did you have in mind?" or "we'll match a competitor's offer," etc. This is ESPECIALLY true with closeout items, scratch and dent, "open box buys," furniture, appliances, and some stuff that is very surprising.
    For cars, I highly recommend a visit to http://www.carbuyingtips.com. This site is FULL of awesome info on bargaining for a car purchase. Exposes typical scams and car sales tactics.
    Best advice is to arm yourself with the facts and competitive prices before you attempt to negotiate (as previously and wisely suggested above).
    G'luck!
    John G
     

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