Cord-Cutting Millennials 'Causing Studios To Take Bigger Risks' Says Lego Film Creator

Discussion in 'Streaming and Digital Media' started by Scott Hart, Feb 25, 2017.

  1. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    For my wife and I, this would mostly be restaurant commercials (Olive Garden does food porn really, really well!) and any commercial with a dog in it! :D
     
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  2. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    I was thinking more in the context of cord cutters - I figure someone using a hacked firestick or whatever is using that in place of legitimate streaming services. So maybe you're a big Game Of Thrones fan, but instead of using HBO Go or HBO Now, you use the illegal box, and then HBO is down a viewer. (OK, one viewer isn't gonna make a difference on that show, but for a bubble show, it could be a different story.) Maybe you used to have Hulu, and you streamed all of your network programming there, but with a jailbroken device, they can't tell that you're watching anymore.

    I was under the impression that DVRs were collecting data and sending that back to the cable companies. So even if it doesn't directly translate to ratings, I've seen plenty of press releases and such about "most TIVO'd moment ever!" and DVR numbers giving boosts to ratings, etc. So it might not be 100% data collection, but I think there is some information they get out of it.

    And I do wonder about DVRs and commercial skipping, long term. I use one too. I'm actually really amazed that the cable company hasn't yet built in some control that won't allow certain commercials to be skipped. Speaking purely hypothetically, I wouldn't be shocked if that's a future innovation - maybe companies will be able to pay an extra fee to lock their commercials so they can't be skipped. If I was advertising a product or service, I'm not sure I'd want to spend my dollars on TV advertising on anything other than a live event.
     
  3. Edwin-S

    Edwin-S Producer
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    This was a big thing in Canada awhile ago. People were border jumping and accessing the US Netflix and HBO streams to keep current on shows like "Game of Thrones". Netflix has put in blocking software to stop this kind of thing. It is just typical of a company to resort to treating the symptom rather than the cause of such behavior which is solely due to the fact that Netflix Canada is inferior to the US version in terms of availability of new shows or current content.

    They supply an inferior quality service in Canada and then complain that people are using VPNs to border jump. The border jumpers also include paying subscribers of Netflix Canada, who figure that they should have equal access to content as US subscribers.

    In short, Netflix fucks over their Canadian subscribers and then bitches when those same subscribers use VPNs to access content that they think they should have access to.

    As for HBO, people were/are pirating "Game of Thrones" because the US airings are ahead of Canadian airings. People watching the series in Canada want to keep current, so they pirate the content because HBO does not provide streaming in Canada. If HBO streaming were available, the pirating of the show would drop substantially, since many of the people doing so have said they are only doing it because the content isn't being provided day and date with the US airings.
     
  4. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    In the defense of Netflix, licensing agreements are very complex. I used to work for a small home video label back at the dawn of Netflix, and we provided them with streaming content when they began offering that service. The thing was, because our content was produced with a variety of partners, we had different rights available for different titles. For some titles, we could only offer them to streaming services like Netflix for domestic (U.S.) use only; for other titles, they were North America only. Some were international. Some were weird combos of some of those options. So I just don't think it's a case of Netflix thinking Canadians are inferior as people and deserve less options; it's probably more of a matter that a lot of content today has varying rights restrictions behind the scenes and different breakdowns over who controls what rights in which territory. From the little experience I had dealing with Netflix, I think they would really like it if licensing was simpler and everything could be made available everywhere equally. For a lot of U.S. titles on Netflix, they're bundled together as a package deal. It may be that some of the titles within those deals don't include Canadian rights. Netflix may have tried to go to the Canadian rights holder to arrange another deal (as they would do with my former company when we could only provide certain rights and not others) and been rebuffed. As far as the VPNs go, I bet that Netflix wishes they could just offer one service everywhere and not have to care about that - but contractually, if they're only allowed to distribute a title in one territory and not another, they have to enforce that otherwise they could be sued by the rights holder for violating the contract.

    I have far more sympathy for HBO subscribers and less sympathy for HBO itself in these circumstances - HBO controls the worldwide rights to Game Of Thrones and they own the show. There's absolutely no reason for the show not to be day and date everywhere, given its popularity and the ease of distribution. This isn't a case of Netflix trying to license something else and facing limitations in what they can procure to offer you, this is HBO doing some kind of weird staggered release thing which doesn't benefit anyone in an internet age.
     
  5. TJPC

    TJPC Second Unit

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    Every month on TCM there are several movies that play on the US network but not in Canada. We get a substitute due to copyright differences. This includes all Laurel and Hardy movies and at least one of the Topper films.
    This is also the reason Warner Archive will not mail MOD discs to Canada, although for some reason out public library has many of them.
     

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