Behringer Products?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike Kao, Jan 10, 2002.

  1. Mike Kao

    Mike Kao Second Unit

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    Right now I'm looking at some of Behringer's sound enhancement products for my current buttkicker setup and future SVS sub; namely the Feedback Destroyer Pro (link) and UltraBass Pro (link). Which what are the differences between these products and which would be most appropriate for my use? Also, would it be possible to have one of these feed my LFE signal to BOTH an SVS and a buttkicker (of course routed to each separate amp) with individual controls for each output? Anyone have any experiences with either one of these products who can offer their input?
     
  2. Sebastien David

    Sebastien David Second Unit

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    well ,after taking a quick look at the first one, i'm not sure what you could use it for...

    from what i understand, this stuff is intended for recording studios or performing artist setups...

    the first device prevents feedback from happening. not a problem in a reproduction setup like yours or mine, feedback is a big problem when you have both a recording and playback part to your system (such as a mic and monitor speakers) in a recording studio or live performance setup.

    i haven't looked at the second one, but i expect it to be of the same type, designed for recording studios or live performance setups, and therefore pretty much useless for any practical purpose in an HT/music setup.

    please, correct me if i'm wrong!
     
  3. BruceD

    BruceD Screenwriter

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    The BFD 1100 and 1124 (which now replaces the 1100) is a popular Parametric EQ for the sub channel. This is used to cut the room's bass peaks caused by standing waves. It has 12 parametric filters per channel and is a stereo unit.

    It is a very popular device here at the forum for use in cutting bass peaks that cause boomy bass in most of our HT rooms.

    I don't have any experience with the second device.
     
  4. Sebastien David

    Sebastien David Second Unit

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    i stand corrected.

    didn't realize, after my first quick look, that this was a parametric equalizer.
     
  5. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    The BFD's main commercial purpose is for feedback elimination. However, it happens to have 12 channels of parametric EQ over the entire audio range (making it great for sub calibration).

    Both products have XLR and 1/4" output plugs (so you can directly output to two items simultaneously). Another solution would be to feed multiple subs/buttkickers using a Y-cable as a splitter.
     
  6. Brian L

    Brian L Cinematographer

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    The UBP add's bass frequencies 1 or 2 octaves below what is on the recording. It is a stereo device, and includes a crossover.

    They are widely used in pro-sound applications (Disco's, Theatres, etc.) but it does work well in a home audio rig, if properly set-up.

    Audio Control made a similar unit (Phase Coupled Activator, I think) that is no longer in production. It was widely praised by Howard Ferstler in the Sensible Sound, and in his book.

    I have a UBP in a tape loop on my reciever, and find that it is great for older pop/rock recordings that really lack low bass, or anything else that seems thin. I could also have added it to the sub-out of my reciever, but I find that I am generally happy with the bass in most of the movies I tend to watch.

    Now, before anyone jumps in to tell you that these things are junk, all I would say is, don't knock it until you try it.

    Yes, it does add something that was not there in the original recording, but I personally feel that the reason some recordings lack bass has more to do with the technology of the day or the skill (or lack thereof) of the engineer, then anything else.

    And besides, when you see most pop/rock bands live, you can actually feel the bass and kick-drums thump you in the chest. The UBP can help get closer to what you hear live, if you so desire.

    If used improperly, it does have the ability to make your stereo sound like a boom car, but used properly, and with restraint, it can add some really nice bottom to recordings that sorely lack it. Be aware that there are a half dozen or so knobs that you have to fiddle with to get the best out of it. And also, it is very program dependent; settings that sound great with one recording may not sound so great on another.

    Funny thing, the better my system got, and the more finely tweaked, the more I notice the lack of bass on some of my favorite recordings (the 1st Van Halen, AC/DC, or early Black Sabbath are good examples).

    One last point. If your tastes run to well recorded music of any genre, that already have proper amounts of bass, the UBP will not really buy you anything.

    And of course, unless you have truely full range speakers (response to 20Hz or so), you will need a sub to really enjoy this.

    Best Regards,

    Brian Leduc
     

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