Be honest....Since most of my dvds are 2:35:1 is burn in that much of a threat???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeff Rogers, Jul 26, 2002.

  1. Jeff Rogers

    Jeff Rogers Second Unit

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    Ok. Only about 20 % of my collection is 1:85:1, the rest are 2:35:1....it seems the majority of dvd's are.
    Being that I am a worrying nut...and Lord of The Rings will not be filling up my entire screen then....is it going to be a big problem if I watch it a shitload of times?
    Will burn in be a big problem?
    Do I really need to rotate enhanced and non enhanced ratios to avoid burn in? Am I worrying for nothing?[​IMG]
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    What kind of display do you have? And how reasonable are the picture settings? (You know the drill: White and Black levels reduced to accurate settings, usually well below fifty percent.)

    Though it's a good idea to mix the type of programming you are watching, burn-in should not be an issue for you if the contrast is set low enough.
     
  3. Jeff Rogers

    Jeff Rogers Second Unit

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    Tv is a Mitusbishi 46809. Contrast levels have been lowered to the (hopefully) safe levels. SO you're saying no problem with black bars on top & bottom with with anamorphic 2:35:1 transfers.
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Oh, it's always a potential problem. Mike Wood of Home Theater magazine likens it to uneven wear on a carpet; if you walk over the same area of carpet all the time, that section of the carpet wears more easily. Same with phosphors in a CRT-based display: If you watch widescreen films exclusively, the active picture area will wear out more quickly.

    So, lowering the contrast and brightness to less than a fifty-percent setting reduces the chances for this--but doesn't eliminate it. Hence, it's a good idea to watch 4:3-originated material as well.
     
  5. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    Too bad you couldn't shift the image up or down for each 2.35:1 movie you watch, almost like a screen saver [​IMG]
     
  6. Bruce Hedtke

    Bruce Hedtke Cinematographer

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    It is a "threat" in the pure sense that it's technically possible to happen. If you calibrate the set with Avia or VE, that threat diminishes considerably. I watch alot of 2.35 films and I don't worry about it. I have seen burn-in on sets on showroom floors and although it is noticable, it isn't the most distracting thing in the world. Not that you shouldn't try to avoid it, of course.

    Bruce
     
  7. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    Well IMHO if you watch movies exclusively, and 80% of those are 2.35... well then even if you do get burn in it should only be noticable on a small portion of your viewing right? just somethign else to consider..... but i second the vote that tv's should be able to shift the images up down or keep it int he middle, what a way to avoid burn in.
     
  8. Ken Garrison

    Ken Garrison Supporting Actor

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    Seems like BURN IN is more of a problem on big screen HDTV sets than they are on regular direct view SDTVs. Hell, maybe I'll save up for an LCD or Plasma display and won't have to worry about BURN IN.
     
  9. Allan Mack

    Allan Mack Supporting Actor

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  10. Ken Garrison

    Ken Garrison Supporting Actor

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    *cartman voice* AWWW...Son of A BITCH!! Well, how come I have NO PROBLEM with BURN IN on my direct view SDTVs, but everybody else has a problem with burn in on their BIG SCREEN HDTVs? The taskbar never causes any burn in on our computer monitors. WTF?
     
  11. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    Burn in is the biggest risk on RPTV's and i believe extra precautions are taken on computer monitors to prevent it as there are by nature so many static images on computers. as well teh better the tv i figure the more likely you will notice a little bit of burn in, if you paid 5000$ for a tv you will just be more critical.
     
  12. Michael Brunet

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    Chris,

    Some DVD players *can* move the 2.35 image around the screen, like the malata n996 - not as nice as the popular panny progressive models, but still a nice player (region free as well), and *very* helpful for avoiding screen burn-in. Having this player was one of the reasons that I bought an RPTV...

    Mike
     

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