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Kent K H

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The return of 3D was the one silver lining of the whole mediocre affair that was Avatar. Would certainly not mind seeing it make another comeback. Really hoping to go out and catch Dr. Strange 2 in stereo before I lose the opportunity, given how much I thought it enhanced the first.
 

MartinP.

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No one has mentioned that they charge more to watch movies in 3-D as a problem.

I won't get into why, but because of a defect, I cannot see films in 3D. In the days with the red and blue lenses to see 3D films that was a no go at all. The current 3D technology allows me to at least view films that are 3D. However, it's really annoying to have to pay more for films in 3D when I get nothing out of it. And also, I wear glasses and have to wear 3D glasses over glasses. So, just not for me.

I read this once from a movie reviewer, and have quoted it before... He wrote, "Since movies began, audiences do not think of movies as not being in 3D." In my opinion, from my perspective, I would think that is true, otherwise more people would be interested in them.
 

Stephen_J_H

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just the initial shooting cost is too high to handle. not to mention post shooting implementation...

I watched an interview with Jason Goodman from 21st Century 3D who mentioned that the technological advancements for native 3D cinematography has become surprising more cost efficient in the past few years with some of the rigs capable of ultra high def, wide pan, and extremely portable for location shooting. Even with another push for 3D, more than likely the directors will nix all negative parallax (pop-out) because it's a "gimmick". When 3D became all about depth is when I quit going to theaters for 3D.
If we were talking about shooting IMAX 3D on film, costs would be ridiculous. However, with a digital workflow, the real cost is human capital: people who know how to shoot and edit 3D to minimise eyestrain and retain the stereoscopic illusion as much as possible. Frankly, it used to be storage that was the significant cost with digital 3D; these days, it's the microchips needed in the shooting and editing gear because of the supply chain issues. Even then, the cost vs. large format photochemical 3D is significantly less. The article linked in this thread indicates that Disney wants to make this as accessible as possible by releasing multiple 3D formats: 4K HFR 3D [and IMAX] all the way down to RealD and Dolby 3D. Most cinemas haven't gotten rid of their Z-Screens; they just stopped using them. While IMAX 3D with HFR may be the pinnacle experience, it needn't be the only one.
 

John Dirk

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Yes, I think 3D is going to have a significant bump upon the release of the Avatar films based on public curiosity and given the fact that Cameron is pushing for theaters to show it in the format, and that the film was lensed for it. However, after those films are long gone, it's the same old routine for everything else which follows which is simply upscaled fare.
I personally doubt the current generation knows or cares about Cameron or the Avatar franchise. I suspect both this film and the Spinal Tap reboot will be commercial flops but maybe not. Concerning 3D, I still have my collection which will suffice if need be.
 

Alan Tully

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I personally doubt the current generation knows or cares about Cameron or the Avatar franchise. I suspect both this film and the Spinal Tap reboot will be commercial flops but maybe not. Concerning 3D, I still have my collection which will suffice if need be.
Yup, Cameron has spent all this century so far on the various Avatar's, did he even notice that 3D has died the death (again!) while he's been at it. It's been 13 years since Avatar. If the sequel underperforms, then the release of 3 & 4 are going to be awkward.
 

Kent K H

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Yup, Cameron has spent all this century so far on the various Avatar's, did he even notice that 3D has died the death (again!) while he's been at it. It's been 13 years since Avatar. If the sequel underperforms, then the release of 3 & 4 are going to be awkward.
I can't see it flopping. I've learned never to bet against Cameron. But I could definitely see them have more muted box office than the original. I get why they would all get bankrolled. I mean, what sounds more like a sure thing than sequels to the biggest money-maker of all time? But personally, I have no interest and don't know anyone who does.
 

RolandL

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They did. Unsurprisingly it completely flopped, as did 3DTV and blu-ray in general.

and 4K

14k.jpg
 

Dick

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i think most of the new TVs will likely be “3D-less”, leaving the “3D generating job” to playback devices and softwares... after all, making specific presentation hardware(TV or Monitor or Projector) with specific “3D Processor” embedded will be too costly to draw buyers attention.

Gee, ya know, I've never seen a quote regarding just how much manufacturers had to pay for the chip and circuitry to produce 3D, but I'm guessing it wasn't all that friggin' much. The higher cost of the displays ought to have easily covered it, and could again. Let's just do it right this time:

One fuckin' system, preferably active. No more bullshit promotional tie-ins that hold a title like AVATAR hostage for a year by one t.v. manufacturer. Advertise the hell out of any new system and its subsequent software. Get Hollywood to make decent, thoughtful and appropriate 3D movies, not crap thrillers and hyperactive sci-fi. Get movie studios and rights holders to begin working with Blu-ray movie companies to get out the remaining, unreleased classic titles.

Get Di$ney to start offering 3D again, not only in theaters, but on Blu-ray, including ones that have been shown in 3D in theaters, but were skipped over on disc, such as PETE'S DRAGON, RAYA AND THE LAST DRAGON, ENCANTO and MULAN, and more recent Pixar films, such as SOUL, TURNING RED and LUCA, plus a few released in 3D only in Europe, like ONWARD and STAR WARS: THE RISE OF SKYWALKER (although these can be had easily and cheaply on the American market).

Yes, I believe, and always have, that the slow demise of the relatively long-lasting wave of 3D during the 2000's was due to poor marketing and a disinterest on the part of display manufacturers. A really clever and effective advertising campaign and a return of hardware support can get this format back to viability, but it must reflect all the learning that has gone on during the past two decades. TV manufacturers sold us out first, then Disney, then everything fell like dominos. C'mon back, boys...the water's fine!
 

Josh Steinberg

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I adore 3D more than most but it has not ever been nor is it likely ever to be a popular mainstream format for a majority of the public a majority of the time. Convincing people that they should like something they don’t is never a winning argument.

There will likely continue to be exceptions to the rule, like Avatar, that will encourage a larger portion than normal of the general public to see a film that way, but there is no widespread appetite for it to become the dominant format.

TV manufacturers didn’t sell us out. They included the feature for a good five years or so, and the people that were interested in it bought in, and the people that weren’t didn’t. It cost money to implement, and eventually, the implementation interfered with the implementation of a different consumer format that proved more popular. If it sold enough in context of the numbers mass consumer electronics companies require for success, they’d still make it.

For perspective, Apple just discontinued the iPod because it was selling “only” three million units a year. Consumers were buying 3D TVs specifically for 3D functionality at a rate of maybe a thousand units a year. You’re not going to convince companies that consider millions of units a failure to somehow see thousands of units as a success.

The better option would probably to convince a niche manufacturer to do a small yearly run, where their expectations of success better matched the public appetite. Look at some of the high end audio companies that are making subwoofers or separates components that are selling in the hundreds of units per year. That’s the kind of company you’d need to convince to dip their toe into that water. That’s why projectors still offer it - those companies might only move hundreds or thousands of units a year, not millions, but if 500 people out of two thousand want 3D, that’s a market they can cater to because that’s at a scale they operate at.

The larger issue will be that we’re entering a period where the content is drying up because the vast majority of audience members aren’t interested in it the vast majority of the time, and it’s not worth it to the studio to add a ten or twenty million expense to the budget they can’t recoup. There is no pathway towards convincing large studios to spend money on something their audience doesn’t want to pay for, and in many cases, will actively avoid.

Treat niches like niches and they can survive. Expect blockbuster numbers out of niches and you’ll just doom them to failure.
 

Lord Dalek

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Expect blockbuster numbers out of niches and you’ll just doom them to failure.

Well its too late for that. Software has all but completely dried up and Disney's likely not going to do it again even if Cameron begs them to release a 3D disc that all of five people with accounts here will buy,
 

Artanis

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Clearly, Dr Strange is testing ground for 3D again. Naturally dropping the Avatar 2 3D trailer before the movie is perfect. I hear Disney will re-release the original Avatar 3D back into the theaters before 2 and build the hype, like they did with Star Wars. Then release Avatar 2 at Christmas time, and the 3D experience will be mind blowing, reflecting a whole new approach to 3D. Like Kent K H said earlier, I wouldn't bet against Cameron. If 2022 closes with 3 blockbuster 3D releases, it could be a game changer.
 

YANG

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Gee, ya know, I've never seen a quote regarding just how much manufacturers had to pay for the chip and circuitry to produce 3D, but I'm guessing it wasn't all that friggin' much. The higher cost of the displays ought to have easily covered it, and could again. Let's just do it right this time...
yes, panels and other components may cost more than the 3D generating chips or circuitry... however, to make people buy a specific feature of a TV, spreading across different sizes and to different crowds across different regions... the kind of cost, will be far more obvious than mass produce single design system.
 

YANG

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It's polarizing undeniably.
some eyes can take 3D effects like tasty chocolate, some eyes cant... in cinematic view.
some willing to pay more for that experience, some would rather pay for hearing sensory experience rather than eyes... cinematically again of course.

eventually, after the theatrical screening ends, movies ends up in home video market. be it streaming or in physical media form, what are the chances that the response or demand will be equal to box office sales or more?
 

Lord Dalek

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eventually, after the theatrical screening ends, movies ends up in home video market. be it streaming or in physical media form, what are the chances that the response or demand will be equal to box office sales or more?

The trickle down effect from theaters to home media never happened ten years ago. You'd be crazy to think it'll happen now.
 

Johnny Angell

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Already have tickets for IMAX 3D "Jurassic World".
I was going to comment on how lucky you are since I didn’t expect our imax in Little Rock to show the 3D version. But before putting my foot in my mouth I checked and it looks like we’ll get one showing a day in imax 3D.
directors didn't want it incorporated into their films given the gimmickry it introduced.
I would have worded that as “perceived gimmickry”. Then I’d take the proverbial 2x4 and tell the directors to get over it. JK.
I don't know why it gives such pleasure to some people that others cannot watch movies in a theater in the format that they want.

Some people appear gleeful that some theaters will not project 3D films.
That’s called schadenfreude. Jeez, I spelled it rite the first time!
implementation interfered with the implementation of a different consumer format that proved more popular.
Was that 4K? If so, I didn’t know the two had problems.
 

YANG

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