Another Router Question: How easy is it to switch brands?

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Ronald Epstein, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Founder
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    I'll repeat what I said in a previous thread....

    Verizon gave me a wireless-G D-Link router
    with my FIOS service. I am not happy with
    the router as it provides a very short range
    of bandwidth across my house.

    I attempted to add a D-LINK range extender,
    but it failed to work despite the fact the
    company said it's compatable.

    Now....

    I want to go back to using Linksys products.
    I want to buy a Wireless-G router and a speed
    booster. I think that will cover what I need.

    The problem?

    I am not sure how easy it will be to configure
    the router to Verizon's Fios settings.

    My first question...

    Is it a simple matter of unplugging my current
    D-LINK router and replacing it with a Linksys
    and expecting it to work?

    If not, how easy is it going to be to figure
    out how to set up the Linksys router to Verizon's
    specs? I know that Verizon will probably not
    even assist me unless I pay for tech support.

    Just wondering how hard or easy it may be
    to switch brands of routers. Would appreciate
    any help you can provide.

    Thanks
     
  2. Paul McElligott

    Paul McElligott Cinematographer

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    Theoretically, it should be, considering that most laptops these days come with 802.11g cards built in that probably not the same brand as your router. The main hitch I've heard of is the WEP key generator being incompatible between brands, meaning that you had to hand enter the hex values rather than rely on the keyword generator.
     
  3. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Founder
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    Paul,

    Thanks.

    Actually, the wireless laptop (802.11b) is
    the easy part. Yes, it picks up any signal
    with no hitch.

    The problem (and I should have been more
    specific in my question) is the two computers
    that are HARDWIRED to the wireless router.

    How difficult is it going to be to switch out
    one brand for another and hope that my Internet
    connection will pass through it?
     
  4. Paul McElligott

    Paul McElligott Cinematographer

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    I don't see why you'd have any problem at all. Wired ethernet is about as standardized as you can get. There may be some information you had to enter into your old router to get it to connect to your ISP. Just make sure you transfer that information to your new router.
     
  5. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    Also make sure you release the IP address from each of your PC's before trying to connect them to the new router -- assuming you are using DHCP to assign addresses. Before connecting to the new router, go to the command prompt and enter "ipconfig /release", then shutdown the PC.
     
  6. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    I'm never voluntarily buying D-Link again. Have had nothing but bad experiences with their stuff.

    That said...

    Assuming the router has an ethernet connection both in and out it should be simple. You'll just have to copy down the settings that your current router uses, in that case, and see that the new router has those settings added (IP number, gateway, DNS-servers...)

    The simplest case would be if your ISP was using DHCP to issue the network settings automatically. In that case it truly would be a case of unplugging the current router, plugging in another one and making what minor firewall changes you need and adjusting your wireless settings in the router to what you want them to be (WPA encryption etc.)

    If, however, you have some other incoming connection to the router than ethernet (like a router with DSL in directly, ie where the router is both modem and router - unlikely in your case) it becomes slightly trickier as you need to make sure what you get is compatible with what your ISP provides.

    You do have another option than just switching routers - you can switch antennas.

    http://www.radiolabs.com/products/an...ibberduck5.php

    That will increase signal strength considerably, and there are many more advanced options to really boost wifi performance.

    For instance, you can DIY a directional antenna from a tin can for lots of performance for peanuts.
     
  7. Mike Fassler

    Mike Fassler Supporting Actor

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    yeah make sure you get the upgraded antenna for your router, they usually help quite a bit with deadspots.
     
  8. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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