$2000 to spend on a 16:9

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave Gorman, Mar 19, 2002.

  1. Dave Gorman

    Dave Gorman Supporting Actor

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    In about a month I will be moving into a larger house and would like to take the opportunity to upgrade from my 27" 4:3. I would very much appreciate 1) specific recommendations, and 2) as I am just starting to research 16:9's, I could use advice on what to look for, things to avoid, etc.

    Thanks muchly for all help!!
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Maybe a few more specifics would help. What are the room dimensions? What kind of material do you view the most?

    As it is, $2,000 provides you with plenty of tantalizing options--considering how deeply many sets are discounted. For now, your baseline should be Panasonic's 47-inch 16:9 RPTV. But don't discount direct-view sets. Nor should you opt for picture size over picture quality.
     
  3. Andy F

    Andy F Stunt Coordinator

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    i like the picture on the panasonic 47" widescreen. I can't remember the model number, but it shouldn't be hard to find. it lists for $2200, but you can definitely get it for less.
     
  4. Dave Gorman

    Dave Gorman Supporting Actor

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  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Gregg Lowen certainly likes the 47-inch Panny. But, in my experience, Panasonics tend to run at too high a color temp across the board, resulting in a blue-tinted picture. Even after a session with Video Essentials, you'd probably be best off with a professional calibration. Then the Panny's picture would be stunning.

    The Tosh, while smaller, comes equipped with a more accurate color decoder--meaning that you would be able to tame it more easily if using only the user controls.

    Either set is fine--and better than nine out of ten households will ever see. But plan on forking over an extra $200-$300 for a professional, ISF-certified calibration.
     
  6. Dave Gorman

    Dave Gorman Supporting Actor

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  7. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    The best $2k video system I've seen is a used 7" CRT projector ($1200) + HTPC + screen ($45 sheet of plastic).

    Pros:

    - Best picture

    - Largest picture

    Cons:

    - Slightly more involved setup

    - computer knowledge required (can you install a video card, drivers, Software, etc.)

    - Light control is essential (need blackout curtains over any windows)

    If this is the family TV, I'd 2nd the 42" Toshiba recommendation.
     
  8. NathanS

    NathanS Agent

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    I looked at the Panasonic 47", and a 47" Samsung. They're both nice sets, but I went with the Samsung, since I needed a screen protector.
     
  9. Dwight Amato

    Dwight Amato Stunt Coordinator

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    I have the 47" Panny and I love it. Model number is PT47WX49 (or wx51 which has the protective glare screen). Out of the box, like ANY set, it is in torch mode. Just turning down contrast, brightness and sharpness makes a huge difference. But this set really shines after some tweaking.

    I have done the 64 point convergence, red push, efocus, mfocus, and SVM (physical wires). The longest was the convergence, which was probably around 2 hours total. That is the same with any set though. The others were probably a grand total of 30 minutes. I love the set, and the picture is unbeatable in it's price range (i got mine wx51 for $1570).

    I have to say, most of the sets in this range are actually pretty good. The toshiba's might look better out of the box but they suffer from ghosting and the dreaded upconversion to 540p, but they don't lock into full mode on progressive and have better stretch modes. Check them out for yourself and decide, just remember that the showroom is often the worst place to see any of these sets...
     
  10. Kelley_B

    Kelley_B Cinematographer

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    I was just recently able to purchase a Mitsubishi 46809 for $1850 + tax. I love the set as does anyone else who comes over to view it.
     
  11. Ed Faver

    Ed Faver Second Unit

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    Ahh, another chance to rave about my Hitachi 43UWX10B. Great picture, easy to use & it comes in a nice compact package. Paired with a Panasonic RP56, I'm getting picture-quality I never thought possible at my budget for home theater.

    I use Final Fantasy to show off the system. Regardless of what one might think of the story of this film, Final Fantasy really shows off this set to the max.
     
  12. Stephen Houdek

    Stephen Houdek Second Unit

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    Yes, Hitachi's are great sets. I love my 53UWX10B.[​IMG]
     

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