What's new

Why a cross-over when there is as SMAL/LARGE speaker setting? (1 Viewer)

Andre Barros

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Messages
72
Ok, I might be getting this all wrong but I'll ask the question anyway. My receiver allows me to set the size of the speakers and it also has a adjustable (100, 150 and 200) cross-over. I know that seting the speakers to small sends the lower frequencies to the sub not distorting the sound of the speakers, but isn't that the same function of the cross-over? How do these two settings (cross-over and speaker size) work together? Do they complement each other? Are they totaly different things? Thaks for any responses.

Best regards,

André
 

ColinM

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2001
Messages
2,050
It should really be called an adjustable low-pass, meaning that the low frequencies are passed to the sub, while the speakers get high passed info.

Crossovers deal with 2 or more drivers in the same enclosure, generally speaking.

"Crossover" works as a description, though.
 

brentl

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 7, 1999
Messages
2,921
You also need to remember that most "built in" crossovers don't work low enough.

Most people prefer a crossover in the 40-50Hz range and not the 80-100 that is common. You'll notice it pretty easy too.

Smaller bookshelf speakers can go with a mild(6Db per octave) cutoff for low frequencies starting around the 80-100Hz range.

Don't forget that male voices can be heard quite easily in a sub when crossed over at 80-100Hz

Brent
I wish I could write as well as I speak:)
 

Greg*go

Supporting Actor
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Messages
941
If your receiver is like mine, then the crossover only works when the speakers set to small. So you are right, then do work together. When the speakers are set to small, the crossover frequency tells the receiver how low the signal to the speakers should go down to, and how high of a signal the sub receives. Makes sense?
 

RobWil

Supporting Actor
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Messages
733
I know that setting the speakers to small sends the lower frequencies to the sub not distorting the sound of the speakers, but isn't that the same function of the cross-over?
But instead of the reciever having a fixed crossover setting YOU get to choose the crossover based on the frequency response of your speakers. Some people may have mid to larger sized speakers which can easily handle the
100 Hz. If you have small sattelites you may want to choose the higher crossover settings. It's just giving you a choice instead of forcing you to use a preset crossover frequency.
 

John Garcia

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jun 24, 1999
Messages
11,571
Location
NorCal
Real Name
John
The large/small speaker setting essentially IS the crossover in your receiver. By setting the speakers to large, you disable the crossover. Your receiver simply happens to have an adjustable x-over point.

The crossovers in your speakers are to appropriately separate frequencies for each driver, and do not typically control where the roll off is at the bottom end - this is normally just a function of the mid/bass driver's physical capabilities. Meaning, in almost all speakers, the crossover does not determine what the low frequency extension of a speaker is.

A properly positioned and calibrated system will not draw attention to the sub. I have a fixed 100Hz x-over with no complaints.
 

Andre Barros

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Messages
72
Thanks guys! I think I got mixed up since I was under the impression that the adjustable cross-over was still active even when the speakers were set to large but now I'm not sure. I'll check it as soon as I get home. Thanks again.

Best regards,

André
 

ColinM

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2001
Messages
2,050
When large, it's not active as far as those "large" speakers are concerned. They will get the full signal.

However, your sub can still be in the mix or not, and you may be able to adjust it's cut-off frequency, while running large speakers at the same time.

This is dependent on each manufacturer's programming.
 

Andre Barros

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Messages
72
I just checked my receiver and now it all makes sense. The x-over is deactivated as soon as I set the speakers to large. Thanks for the help everyone!
 

Vince Maskeeper

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 18, 1999
Messages
6,500


Not true- any conjunction of filters seperating the signal into multiple bands is a cross over. The crossover inside the receiver is the same concept as one in speakers- one is just passive (post amp) and one is active (preamp).

As andres discovered- the crossover and large/small setting are the same thing- or moreso the large/small is a subset of the corssover. The large/small setting activates, deactives the x-over, and it splits at the point you tell it.

-vince
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Sign up for our newsletter

and receive essential news, curated deals, and much more







You will only receive emails from us. We will never sell or distribute your email address to third party companies at any time.

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
357,544
Messages
5,140,531
Members
144,409
Latest member
LynPaulFan1961
Recent bookmarks
0
Top