What do "Lo/Ro" and "Lt/Rt" stand for?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Marc Rochkind, Dec 19, 2001.

  1. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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    I understand that "Lo/Ro" is un-matrixed and "Lt/Rt" is Dolby Surround matrixed. (My DVD player can downmix Dolby Digital to them.)

    Assuming "L" stands for left and "R" stands for right, what do "o" and "t" stand for?

    I could guess nOn-matrixed and maTrixed, but I'd rather know for sure. ;-)
     
  2. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    Marc: what are you talking about... more information is needed to help you.
     
  3. gregstaten

    gregstaten Supporting Actor

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    LT/RT stands for Left Total / Right Total. As you surmised, this is the term for a two channel mix that contains a matrixed multichannel mix.

    Though I see LT/RT all the time in post production, I haven't heard the term LO/RO before, though.

    -greg
     
  4. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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  5. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    Marc: where are you seeing this nomenclature? Edit: Err... I wonder where you are seeing this in consumer gear? Is this a setting on some Receiver or Preamp/Processor?
     
  6. Jeff Adams

    Jeff Adams Screenwriter

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    I know what Marc is talking about but I have no idea what it is. This is a setting on my dvd player for audio. I have never messed with it and just leave it in "off" mode.
     
  7. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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    It's on the DVD setup menu, under "Downmix." It refers to how I want a Dolby Digital source (e.g., a DVD with no other soundtrack) downmixed to the analog stereo outputs. (I'm using coaxial for the digital output.) My choices, as noted are OFF, meaning I get very screwed up sound, Lo/Ro, meaning plain sterero, or Lt/Rt, meaning Dolby Surround matrix.

    It's important if you're sending the DVD sound to an analog device. I could tell you more, but it would violate the forum rules...

    The terminology I think comes straight from Dolby, as I saw references to this notation in some of their technical papers.

    Incidentally, I thought all DVDs had a Dolby Surround track until I got The Nightmare Before Christmas. Dolby Digital only! Maybe this is common, but I never noticed before.
     
  8. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    Ah Haaaa! Now I get you! And in fact, I wonder if my DVD player has the same settings that I overlooked. I primarily use my DVD player audio via the digital output also. However, sometimes, I also like to alter the color compositions of my DVD output and process it through my Sima SCC for fun. In that situation, I do usually use only my analog stereo outputs of my DVD player at the same time to avoid audio mis-syncing. Maybe I need to look and see if in fact my RP91 has those same settings for its' stereo analog outputs???
     
  9. Ron Reda

    Ron Reda Cinematographer

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    I saw the same thing when setting up my new JVC XV-S62SL DVD player last night...

    BTW, I was thoroughly impressed by it's performance. I was considering this player before I purchased the RP91. Just yesterday, I was offered a deal that I couldn't refuse ($100)...I couldn't pass it up, so I bought it for the bedroom. I pretty much just "eyed" the settings on my TV (it's used primarily to view sat TV) and it put out a great looking picture. Not bad, JVC!
     

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