What did you watch this week in classic TV on DVD(or Blu)?

Jeff Flugel

Premium
Joined
Jan 7, 1999
Messages
2,235
Location
Osaka, Japan
Real Name
Jeff Flugel
Steve Canyon episode 9, Operation B-52 (Nov.15, 1958) W: Charles Beaumont, D: Arthur Hiller. Guest starring Richard Anderson, Sylvia Lewis, John Compton...

Colonel Steve Canyon is having a SH*T day on what should be an enjoyable assignment flying a B-52 on an around-the-world flight in a record-setting bid to prove the huge Boeing jet's global reach to drop an H-Bomb anywhere, anytime...the B-52 is a gas guzzler to beat them all, and thus will require at least 3 in-flight re-fuelings to accomplish the 25,000 mile flight...problem is, his B-52's re-fueling port is frozen over and he can't take on any fuel from the KC-97 tanker jet at the first rendevous point...Canyon also has a nagging efficiency expert from the Pentagon hovering over his shoulder, played to conceited and imperious perfection by Richard Anderson...this is the kind of guy that would make up defense secretary Robert McNamara's cadre of the "best and brightest" at the JFK/LBJ era Pentagon during the coming disastrous Vietnam war debacle...Canyon and his crew find themselves in a no-win position, too far from any suitable landing airfield, and left with the option of abandoning the big bomber via ejection...an embarrassing last resort, as Canyon notes it is "an 8 million dollar aircraft"...Canyon definitely wants to make General someday, and as his current boss at SAC (Strategic Air Command) is four-star general and WW2 legend Curtis Lemay, affectionally known as "Ironass" and said to be the real-life model for Dr. Strangelove's General Buck Turgidson, or even General Jack D. Ripper (ha, ha), Canyon will do anything to avoid losing the expensive jet bomber...and even in successful ejections from a B-52, serious injuries and even death can result, as explosive charges and a fuselage cutter are deployed to punch a man right through the aluminum fuselage at 500 mph...
This is the one Steve Canyon episode I've seen, Randall - excellent write-up! You remind me that I really need to get on the stick and pick up those lovingly-restored three volume DVD sets that John Ellis pretty much single-handedly produced (at much personal cost to his health and finances). A Herculean task that definitely bore fruit for fans of this somewhat forgotten series.

 

Purple Wig

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Jan 21, 2019
Messages
147
Real Name
Alan
She's fine in the Pertwee "The Time Monster" serial, Howie (as some sort of Atlantean queen, if I recall correctly), but stinks up the room with her cringeworthy performance in Davison's "Warriors of the Deep." She was obviously an actress more suited to period roles.



Read several of her columns for denofgeek. She illuminates how she came to be cast in Warriors of the Deep, as well as some other Doctor Who related experiences and opinions. Like a lot of actresses perhaps best remembered for their physical attributes, she proves to be quite witty.
 

Rustifer

Premium
Joined
Oct 20, 2017
Messages
2,089
Location
Carmel, Indiana
Real Name
Russ J.
Episode Commentary
Three's Company
"Jack The Giant Killer" (S1E5)

Oh, sweet divinity of lust. Chrissy Snow. The crotch palpitation of the 1970's and most likely the only reason for this series' existence. Did I think John Ritter was a funny guy? Sure. Was Joyce DeWitt as cute as a button? You bet (disclosure--her brother and I are long time buddies). But the show truly belonged to bubbly vixen Suzanne Somers--her sweet 'n tart character being a fantasy for male viewers of all ages. ABC truly found a gem in her--despite nearly overshadowing their star pupil John Ritter. Anyway, throw them all into the burnt orange cheesy decor of a 70's SoCal apartment, dust it with a persimmon-sour landlord (Normal Fell) and his near nymphomaniac wife (Audra Lindley), and Poof!--You have a hit show.

Jack, Chrissy and Janet take a break from their weekend fix-up of the apartment to visit the Regal Beagle pub down the street. In no time flat, Chrissy is hit on by a barfly brute. Jack, who seemingly suffers from a dual personality of straightforward normality and Don Knotts puerility, hasn't the gonads to brush the brute back. Although Chrissy and Janet sympathetically praise his civil restraint, it's obvious he has all the machismo of a chicken salad sandwich.

1600866744768.png
1600866921032.png
1600866974497.png

Jack suddenly desires something pear-shaped; Can't imagine who would hit on this; Mr. Roper consults his Acme Landlord Guide

Back at the apartment, Jack complains bitterly of his cowardice. Coincidentally in the bathroom while Chrissy is taking a shower--which should arouse the crap out of any red-blooded male, Jack merely laments "Don't worry--I'm so down I couldn't even raise a smile." One of the episode's better lines.

The three return to the bar the following night--an establishment that never seems to be more populated than 5 or 6 patrons. Of course, the bully shows up as well. Jack has a sudden spurt of courage and faces the guy down, thus re-establishing his fractured manhood. And so ends the entire premise of this episode. Divine comedy it ain't.
 
Last edited:

mark-edk

Second Unit
Joined
Jun 28, 2002
Messages
369
For anyone who remembers those 'juvenile fiction' books with fondness, this is an excellent look back at the various series, some well remembered, others almost forgotten, and the writers who imbued them with qualities still worth appreciating in the 21st Century.

Man, oh man...you've hit on one of my favorite subjects from my youth---The Hardy Boys....]
 

Rustifer

Premium
Joined
Oct 20, 2017
Messages
2,089
Location
Carmel, Indiana
Real Name
Russ J.
For anyone who remembers those 'juvenile fiction' books with fondness, this is an excellent look back at the various series, some well remembered, others almost forgotten, and the writers who imbued them with qualities still worth appreciating in the 21st Century.
Great essay by Mr. Baumann! He so aptly captures the same sense of enjoyment as I felt in reading The Hardy Boys novels. Love his description of the books as Americana. Most of that was lost in the rewrites to modernize the series.
Good post, Mark!
 

ScottRE

Screenwriter
Joined
Feb 6, 2005
Messages
1,064
Location
New York, Planet Earth
Real Name
Scott
This is the one Steve Canyon episode I've seen, Randall - excellent write-up! You remind me that I really need to get on the stick and pick up those lovingly-restored three volume DVD sets that John Ellis pretty much single-handedly produced (at much personal cost to his health and finances). A Herculean task that definitely bore fruit for fans of this somewhat forgotten series.

This is exactly the reason I bought them and waiting forever after the pre-order for the third and final DVD, as I had no connection to the series. Simply a love of old TV shows. One lone guy did an amazing job and the personal and financial hits he and his missus took to preserve this series. So many others would harass him for their DVDs as time went by. It was an amazing result. Made by the ultimate fan for fans. I’m glad his efforts resulted in at least a minor run of these prints over the air.

It’s a pretty good show to boot.
 

BobO'Link

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 3, 2008
Messages
7,171
Location
Mid-South
Real Name
Howie
Episode Commentary
Three's Company
"Jack The Giant Killer" (S1E5)

Oh, sweet divinity of lust. Chrissy Snow. The crotch palpitation of the 1970's and most likely the only reason for this series' existence.
I couldn't agree more. She was the *only* reason I watched the series. My interest waned with each passing replacement although Priscilla Barnes was no slouch. She's the only reason I managed to make it through the last 3 seasons - most of the time.
Did I think John Ritter was a funny guy? Sure.
Lots of people feel that way. I'm not among them. He's OK but *everything* was telegraphed so much you could see it coming in a heavy fog. And he'd punctuate that with overblown vaudeville reactions. I liked him far better in his more sedate roles - like what he did in Hearts Afire with Markie Post and Billy Bob Thornton.
Was Joyce DeWitt as cute as a button? You bet (disclosure--her brother and I are long time buddies).
As the show went on I came to appreciate the cuteness of Ms. DeWitt far more than the T&A of the various replacements for Chrissy.

So... just how much time did you spend with her while hanging out with her brother?
 

Rustifer

Premium
Joined
Oct 20, 2017
Messages
2,089
Location
Carmel, Indiana
Real Name
Russ J.
So... just how much time did you spend with her while hanging out with her brother?
Joyce's brother and I were biz associates for more than 30 years. When Joyce made it big in Three's Company, she never came back to her home town Indianapolis. Her family's only connection to her was through the lavish Christmas presents she would send home every year. Not surprisingly, after the series closed she did not find steady work and the presents dwindled. I met her only once about 20 years ago while doing an advertising campaign called the Colorful People of Indiana--a tribute to famous folks that hailed from our state. At that time she was living in New Mexico, and I and our photo shoot team flew out there to do a pictorial spread. At this point, she was into some weird American Indian religion and I got to spend a day shooting her posing in the sun-bleached hills around her house. Never once did she mention the series that made her famous--she only talked about upcoming big projects that never came to fruition other than a few bit parts and stage plays. Sad.

I would dig up a copy of our ad campaign featuring her, but if I still had it I'm afraid it lies moldering in a dark spidery corner of my basement where no man or rat should go.

I liked him far better in his more sedate roles - like what he did in Hearts Afire with Markie Post and Billy Bob Thornton.
Yep, that was a good but short-lived John Ritter series. The hotness of Markie Post didn't hurt, and it was a bit before Billy Bob Thorton--some 50 pounds heavier at the time-- became a big star.

1600889154141.png
 
Last edited:

BobO'Link

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 3, 2008
Messages
7,171
Location
Mid-South
Real Name
Howie
In all fairness I should admit that I initially watched Hearts Afire *solely* because of Markie Post. With that series I discovered Ritter had something going besides slapstick. Thornton has always reminded me of a couple of guys I hung with in my HS and college years - "rednecks" who liked to party with us "hippies".
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jeff Flugel

Flashgear

Screenwriter
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
1,895
Location
Alberta Canada
Real Name
Randall
This is the one Steve Canyon episode I've seen, Randall - excellent write-up! You remind me that I really need to get on the stick and pick up those lovingly-restored three volume DVD sets that John Ellis pretty much single-handedly produced (at much personal cost to his health and finances). A Herculean task that definitely bore fruit for fans of this somewhat forgotten series.

Jeff, I love these Steve Canyon sets! Thanks to the hard work and sacrifice of John Ellis and the Milton Caniff Estate, I have all three volumes. I haven't checked their availability or pricing lately, but I hope that fans can still get them. Their attributes are totally unique among my extensive classic TV collection. Sourced from new HD scans of original 35mm elements. Commentaries on nearly every episode. Although originally aired in prime time for NBC in 1958-59, these transfers are from when ABC ran them in summer 1960, and thus they include commercials for ABC's first run prime time 1959-60 shows like The Donna Reed Show, The Real McCoys, The Untouchables, 77 Sunset Strip and Man From Blackhawk...and contemporary daytime shows and strip syndicated re-runs like the game show Face to Face also Love That Bob, Restless Gun and Shotgun Slade...they have interesting vintage artifacts such as the original Liggett and Meyers tobacco commercials for L&M menthols, including Dean Fredericks himself hawking the cigs, ha, ha...ironically, unlike so many in those days, he was a non-smoker...all in all, these are a marvelously nostalgic time capsule for me...and the music by Nathan Scott and Walter Schumann throughout this series is stirring!

SAM_0782.JPG

SAM_0784.JPG


A few selected menu screens...
Canyon 1.JPG

Canyon 51.JPG

Canyon 75.JPG


Terrific animation in an L&M cigarette ad...I took a few screen caps...
Canyon 66.JPG

Canyon 67.JPG

Canyon 68.JPG

Canyon 69.JPG

Canyon 70.JPG


A few screen caps of the other show promos...
Canyon 77.JPG

Canyon 98.JPG

Canyon 97.JPG

Canyon 99.JPG

Canyon 96.JPG

Canyon 123.JPG

Canyon 124.JPG

Canyon 125.JPG

Canyon 126.JPG

Canyon 80.JPG


I have a few more episode reviews with screen caps coming...I hope they are enjoyable...
 

BobO'Link

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 3, 2008
Messages
7,171
Location
Mid-South
Real Name
Howie
Joyce's brother and I were biz associates for more than 30 years. When Joyce made it big in Three's Company, she never came back to her home town Indianapolis. Her family's only connection to her was through the lavish Christmas presents she would send home every year. Not surprisingly, after the series closed she did not find steady work and the presents dwindled. I met her only once about 20 years ago while doing an advertising campaign called the Colorful People of Indiana--a tribute to famous folks that hailed from our state. At that time she was living in New Mexico, and I and our photo shoot team flew out there to do a pictorial spread. At this point, she was into some weird American Indian religion and I got to spend a day shooting her posing in the sun-bleached hills around her house. Never once did she mention the series that made her famous--she only talked about upcoming big projects that never came to fruition other than a few bit parts and stage plays. Sad.

I would dig up a copy of our ad campaign featuring her, but if I still had it I'm afraid it lies moldering in a dark spidery corner of my basement where no man or rat should go.


Yep, that was a good but short-lived John Ritter series. The hotness of Markie Post didn't hurt, and it was a bit before Billy Bob Thorton--some 50 pounds heavier at the time-- became a big star.

View attachment 79043
Yes, that is sad about DeWitt. Three's Company did nothing to help her cause other than a good paycheck for a few years. The writers didn't give her much to prove or hone her acting abilities. I have vague memories after that series ended of her appearing in a few variety show things doing some singing/dancing bits but nothing solid.
 

GMBurns

Supporting Actor
Joined
Oct 14, 2011
Messages
530
Location
Plainville, CT
Real Name
Glenn
This summer I've been able to purchase a bunch of Network/U.K. shows I've been wanting for a while. I haven't had a chance to start watching all of them yet, but tonight I dove into Adam Adamant Lives! 1.1 A Vintage Year for Scoundrels. What a groovy show about a swashbuckling gentleman who wakes up in 1966 after being frozen alive in 1902. He discovers that the world still needs his help to fight crime and uphold honor. Add one part James Bond, two parts Avengers and sprinkle with a little Laugh-In "sock it to me" and presto - Adam Adamant. Too bad someone "wiped" some of the tapes, as there are only 17 remaining episodes. But the first one was a delight to watch. Gerald Harper and Juliet Harmer don't have the panache of Patrick Macnee and Diana Rigg but they are quite fun together and I'll look forward to more episodes. Pure 60's schlock, which I can never get enough of!
 

Jeff Flugel

Premium
Joined
Jan 7, 1999
Messages
2,235
Location
Osaka, Japan
Real Name
Jeff Flugel
This summer I've been able to purchase a bunch of Network/U.K. shows I've been wanting for a while. I haven't had a chance to start watching all of them yet, but tonight I dove into Adam Adamant Lives! 1.1 A Vintage Year for Scoundrels. What a groovy show about a swashbuckling gentleman who wakes up in 1966 after being frozen alive in 1902. He discovers that the world still needs his help to fight crime and uphold honor. Add one part James Bond, two parts Avengers and sprinkle with a little Laugh-In "sock it to me" and presto - Adam Adamant. Too bad someone "wiped" some of the tapes, as there are only 17 remaining episodes. But the first one was a delight to watch. Gerald Harper and Juliet Harmer don't have the panache of Patrick Macnee and Diana Rigg but they are quite fun together and I'll look forward to more episodes. Pure 60's schlock, which I can never get enough of!
Adam Adamant Lives! is a really fun show. Gerald Harper is spot on as Adamant, the proper Edwardian gentleman at all times, especially with the ladies. Love how he has no compunction in dispatching the baddies, either (though he always gives them plenty of chances to save their skin before running them through with his sword cane or throwing them off high buildings, etc.) Juliet Harmer adds to the fun, and is one nice lookin' gal, too!

Glad you managed to track down a copy of the OOP DVD set, Glenn!

 
Last edited:

Rustifer

Premium
Joined
Oct 20, 2017
Messages
2,089
Location
Carmel, Indiana
Real Name
Russ J.
Episode Commentary
The Flintstones
"Boss For A Day" (S6E21)

So, way back in 1960, Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera are sitting in their MGM office working on a few stiff bourbons.
"It's time we move past Tom & Jerry", says Joe, finishing off his third cocktail of the afternoon.
"Yeah, I was thinking about something more modern--maybe a cartoon take-off of the Honeymooners?" offers Bill.
"Hey, you may have something there. We can make it modern, but set it in the Stone Age..." slurs Joe. "And...are you sitting down...get ABC to show it--a cartoon-- in prime time!"
Their secretary, quietly sitting in the corner, shakes her head in disbelief and makes a note to hide the bourbon in the future.
Thus is born The Flintstones--an anachronistic comedy set in Stone Age suburban Bedrock--a peaceful community occasionally shattered by an ear-splitting scream of "WILMAAAAA!!!"

Fred (voice of Alan Reed) is goldbricking on the job, daydreaming on what a good deal his boss has in comparison to his menial existence of operating a brontosaurus excavator at the Bedrock Rock Quarry. Fred's one wish is to be boss for a day. To accomplish this, he calls upon the Great Gazoo--a shark jumping element of the series' last season featuring a small green alien sent to earth to do good deeds. For some reason, only Fred and Barney Rubble can see and hear the little guy. Fred's wish is granted by Gazoo. But he quickly learns, as we would expect, that all the trappings of executive privilege is way offset by the headaches that accompany the job.

1600952500240.png
1600952642069.png
1600952723871.png

Cocktail party in Bedrock; A Buick Sedan circa 30,000 B.C.; Wilma checks Fred's gin-infused breath (note the eco-friendly window)

In comparison to the high quality animation of Disney Studios, the Hanna-Barbera style stubbornly retained its simplistic caliber generally found in Saturday morning cartoons--repetitive monochromatic backgrounds, static human movement and non shadow-casting shapes. Yet the show was labeled as "adult" due to it's similarity to live-action 1960's sitcom content--situational predicaments that easily telegraph their solutions before conclusion. Gazoo should have upgraded the scripts and graphics.

Have a yabba-dabba-do time.
 
Last edited:

Forum Sponsors

Forum statistics

Threads
345,480
Messages
4,743,050
Members
141,460
Latest member
Niloc