subflooring

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Austin R, Jan 16, 2005.

  1. Austin R

    Austin R Auditioning

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    Hello again! I am planning my subfloor and looking for any comments suggestions. My room is 14x20 in the basement(concrete floor) and I plan on having the first 12 feet(length) be raised off the concrete by having 2x4's layed on their side(glued down with liquid nail to prevent squeaking and masonry nails fired) 24" on center and put rigid insulation inbetween the 2x4's. I then plan on putting 2 3/4 inch plywood on top.

    For the next 8 feet I plan on building a riser with 2x12's for a header and footer with 2x6 joists on hangers(basically built like a deck). I would then use the blow in insulation for this portion and then put 2 3/4" plywood on top.

    This would give me about a 10" rise from the first to the second level.

    I read somewhere that some people recommend putting down a pad below the 2x4 sleepers described above. My basement doesn't have a dampness problem - is this still recommended for acoustics? If so, what could I buy that is reasonable in price?

    Any advice would be appreciated!

    thanks,
    Austin
     
  2. Andrew Stoakley

    Andrew Stoakley Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey Austin,

    There are some good threads on this subject that you might want to take a look at. In the search menu of this discussion group type in DRIcore and see what pops up. Also, check out this thread:

    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=223079

    That might help as well.

    Cheers,
    Andrew Stoakley
     
  3. Matthew Cook

    Matthew Cook Stunt Coordinator

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    I would use the rubber 2"x2" squares made for HVAC systems below your 2x4's. Helps with vibration
     
  4. Adam Gregorich

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    I wouldn't lay 2x4s flat as a floor. They are bound to warp eventually. The 2x2 rubber squares could work, and the DRIcore would be your best bet. If there is a vapor barrier beneath your concrete floor you shouldn't have a dampness problem, if there isn't you may someday. Code in most places requires any wood that is in contact with concrete be either pressure treated, or have a layer of roofing felt between the wood and concrete. When I finish mine, I will build the riser above the concrete, but for the main level I intend to use a thick rubber carpet pad (not foam)beneath the carpet.
     
  5. Andrew Stoakley

    Andrew Stoakley Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey guys,

    I placed the DRIcore right on top of my concrete floor and I haven't had any issues with warping, moisture or creaking. Once the floor is full in, it doesn't shift at all. Just make sure it's fairly level and you don't have any 'dips' on the seams. My riser I have sits right on top of the DRIcore and provided an even level surface for constructions. In fact, the DRIcore worked so well, I didn't have to fasten the riser to the sub-floor at all [​IMG] It works great and I would highly recommend it.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
     
  6. Austin R

    Austin R Auditioning

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    Hmmm....So how does DRIcore respond in terms of acoustics? Does it allow bass to still travel within the room? If 2x4's warp laying flat, would it be better if they were layed the other way? Which would be better, Dricore or 2x4's layed the normal way?

    If I would use DRIcore, should I still put 2 3/4 inch plywood panels?

    thanks,
    Austin
     
  7. Adam Gregorich

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    Over time 2x4s will bow naturally. With DRI core you shouldn't need the plywood for your general floor area. You will need plywood sheeting for your stage and riser areas (over the 2x structure.
     
  8. Andrew Stoakley

    Andrew Stoakley Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey Austin,

    Acoustics are outstanding! Increased bass response is one of the main reasons for using the product. As well, I have 65oz broadloom on top with a 10oz underpad, which helps in the absorption of sound. I wouldn't use the DRIcore without any type of top covering. You can even lay laminate flooring on top if you so desire. I wouldn't even try the 2x4 method - you're dealing with pressure treated wood (as stated above) on top of 4 x 8 sheets of plywood.

    The DRIcore product does not require anymore plywood on top. The 1/4" ply it has provides a good base for whatever you would like to do with it. Just make sure if you do plan to attach anything to the DRIcore to not puncture the poly membrane or you will defeat it's properties.

    I highly recommend the product... nothing but [​IMG] for my theatre.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
     
  9. Austin R

    Austin R Auditioning

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    Sounds like DRIcore is my best approach. I am a newbie, so could you expand on what 65oz broadloom and 10oz underpad are, the thought behind them, and where to purchase?

    thanks for your assistance!

    Austin
     
  10. Andrew Stoakley

    Andrew Stoakley Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey austin,

    Just terms for carpet and carpet underpad [​IMG] You can get carpet just about anywhere... heh.

    No problems, let me know if you have any other questions.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
     
  11. Ron W

    Ron W Auditioning

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    So if I understand correctly its dricore, pad, carpet?

    Thanks

    Ron
     
  12. Andrew Stoakley

    Andrew Stoakley Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Ron,

    Yes, if carpet is what you want for your theatre floor. You can also lay down wood laminate if you so desire. It all depends on what you want. I chose carpet for it's sound absorption and warmth, however, if I was using my basement for other purposes I think I would have layed down the laminate.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
     

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