Sony KV32FS16 Pixelation

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by StuG, May 25, 2002.

  1. StuG

    StuG Auditioning

    Joined:
    May 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just got a store credit at Circuit City to replace my Sony Wega KV32FS16. Good thing I purchased the extended warranty, because this TV was near unwatchable at times with the heavy pixelation that was occurring. Examples: Watching a dvd via my Sony DVP-S7700:

    American Beauty- the scene where Kevin Spacey and the kid are smoking outside the party. Big wave of gray pixelations in this dark scene.

    Unbreakable - the scene where the hero follows the guy in orange 'home', in the rain, major pixelation.

    Basically, pixelation easier to spot in scenes that are dark or with much contrast in shades. Also occurred via digital cable, not just DVD. I've seen several reviews of Sony TV's that they are apt to have thiss issue. Am I wrong in thinking that a Sony Wega was among the best non HDTV units available?

    With my store credit, should I go with an new Sony KV32FV27?

    How about a Panasonic CT32SX31 or JVC AV32F802. All have the features I need and are withing the same price range.

    Thanks for you help.
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Do you have so-called "digital" cable?

    What you're describing sounds more like a software- or player-related problem, not a display issue. Why would the WEGA itself, an NTSC-only set, pixelate?

    Never noticed anything like that on mine.

    And, yes, they're good if pricey sets. Given that ATSC-based sets are plummeting in price, I can't see spending more than a grand on NTSC-only technology now.
     
  3. StuG

    StuG Auditioning

    Joined:
    May 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I do have 'digital' cable. When you say software, do you mean in my cable box and dvd player. DVD is a Sony DVP-s7700. Is there an upgrade available?

    The fact that the pixelation happens coming in from cable or with the DVD player as the source led me and several tv technicians to think it was a problem with the tv, they surmised it was the tube.

    In bright scenes or ballgames the picture is stunning! Perfect. In darker scenes it can have this weird jagged haze, which I'm calling pixelation for lack of a better understanding of the problem.

    So when I read user reviews of Sony WEGA products and several of them stated they had to return their products because of huge problems it got me thinking that perhaps Sony quality control was lacking. Am I off base?
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    Lots of causes, some of them have nothing to do with the TV.
    1. Overly compressed source material, common on digital cable. (Do you see the problem on antenna received TV broadcasts?)
    2. Poor comb filter in the digital cable box, try using the composite connection to the TV.
    3. TV's own comb filter is poor (if you are using the composite connection or built in tuner).
    4. TV is so sharp that deficiencies in the source material show up more obtrusively. If you compare results with a different TV, connect both TV sets up the same way, even if you are using the antenna in jack (RF/channel 3/channel 4 method).
    5. DVD player (or cable box on true digital channels) can't keep up with the amount of motion, and also minor shading changes if lots of them.
    Also, line doublers in progressive scan TV sets can introduce this kind of problem.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    "...weird jagged haze..."--

    Are you referring to straight edges taking on a serrated, "stairstep"-like appearance? If so, the slang term for that is "jaggies." And it's a result of interlacing errors--a challenge for the best of comb filters.
     

Share This Page