Signal loss over extended ethernet cable?

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Ronald Epstein, May 9, 2006.

  1. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Founder
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    Quick question....

    I may be buying a media device that needs to be hooked
    directly to a wireless router in order to stream video content
    across my home.

    Problem is, the device is in the adjoining room and cannot
    easily be hooked directly to the router.

    I can, however, run 50' of ethernet cable from one room to
    another (I already have a small hole in the wall between the
    two rooms).

    If I run 50' of ethernet cable, will there be a measurable loss
    in signal strength between the two devices?

    I'm sort of comparing this to the way you lose signal
    strength when using using long extensions of coax cable.

    Also, do I need a CAT5 or CAT6 cord? I have no idea the
    difference.
     
  2. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    IIRC, you should be fine up to at least 100 meters.

    For cabling I would go with Cat5e which is an "extended" standard of Cat5. Cat5 will allow performance up to 100Mbps, but Cat5e can be used in gigabit networks which is appealing for future upgrades.
     
  3. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Founder
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    Seth,

    Thanks for the response.

    Further question....

    Shopping for CAT5E cables there are so many variations
    at different price levels.

    There are standard cables, patch cables, crossover cables, etc.

    I can get a 50' cable for under $10 and one at $25-40.

    Any recommendations? Are there really any variances in
    quality?
     
  4. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    As long as the cable is cat5e certified, it should be fine, Ron. Also, you do not want a crossover cable -- that reverses the transmit and receive cable pairs. Seth is correct about the length -- 10BaseT and 100BaseT ethernet cable limit specifications are 100 meters.
     
  5. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    I've got my media device connected to a 50' Cat5 cable and there's no issue at all...in fact my notebook, printer and soundbridge are all on 50' cables.
     

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